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In order to get an ICC profile created by Breathing Color, you must print out our print targets and send them to Breathing Color's sales office. Click the links below for both print targets:

Print Target 1: http://www.breathingcolor.com/bc/catalog/includes/pdf/TC9_18_RGB_i1_1_2.zip

Print Target 2: http://www.breathingcolor.com/bc/catalog/includes/pdf/TC9_18_RGB_i1_2_2.zip

When printing out these targets, you DO NOT apply a color profile to these targets, we need to receive them raw, with no color adjustment by Photoshop or your print driver. In Adobe Photoshop, please make sure that your color handling option has "no color adjustment". From there, you would click "Print." Go into your print driver and make sure that your printer's color management is switched to OFF. We do not want Photoshop correcting the colors or your printer driver.

When sending in the targets, make sure to cut them out and separate the two targets with computer paper, or put them in plastic sleeves if possible. Protecting the integrity of the color targets is very important. Try to send the targets to Breathing Color's profiling department as if they were a print for one of your customers. If any scuffing occurs to just one square of the target, it may affect the entire graph making the target unable to be scanned.

Please send the print targets to:

ATTN: BC Profiling Dept.
941 N. Elm Street (Suite F)
Orange, CA 92867

Here is the proper procedure:

1. Load the canvas into the printer.
2. On the front panel, choose Roll and Fine Art Paper -> Fine Art Paper> 250 g/m2.
3. Using the HP Printer Utility, open the Color Center tab.
4. Click on Create and Install ICC Profile.
5. Enable the following: Add a new paper and Print target and create ICC profile. Click Next.
6. In Paper Name, type a suitable name for the paper.
7. In Paper Type, choose Fine Art Material -> Thick Fine Art Paper (>250 g/m2). Click Next.
8. A custom paper will be created.
9. On the next screen, you will see the profile name for the new custom paper. Click Cancel.
10. Click on Manage Papers.
11. Click on Change Printing Properties.
12. Choose the custom paper you just added.
13. UNCHECK THE CUTTER OPTION. Click Apply. Click OK.
14. Click OK then Close.
15. Click on Calibrate Your Printer and run a calibration for your new custom paper.
16. When the calibration is done, click on Create and Install ICC Profile and create a profile for your new custom paper.

If you would like to speak with a Breathing Color media specialist about printer settings, please feel free to give us a call on our toll free number: 1-866-72-COLOR. You can also speak with Breathing Color support representatives by sending an email to: support@breathingcolor.com

Adobe Photoshop automatically places the profiles in the directory:

Hard Drive(C:)\Library\Colorsync\Profiles

Adobe Photoshop automatically places the profiles in the directory:

C:\WINDOWS\system32\spool\drivers\color

Breathing Color sends out emails to all customers in our database for Promotional Sales. These item(s) will vary in discount, availability and some may have a maximum quantity allowed to order per customer.

Breathing Color Sales representatives do not know which products will be offered as a special until the day of the sale. Breathing Color has a strict policy on when we close our promotional sales. Please refer back to the promotional email which will tell you when the current sale expires. Breathing Color sales representatives do not have the power to offer promotional discounts for orders that were placed prior to the promotional email.

We understand that some customers may feel that they had bad timing" and ordered a product prior to the promotion being announced, in some cases, the day before the promotion. The fact is, hundreds of customers order Breathing Color products every day and many customers experience this. If they didn't purchase the product the day before the promo, it might have been 2 days, 3 days, or even two weeks prior to the promo. Every customer is going to react differently in regards to the amount of time elapsed since their last order of that particular product on promotion, but the reality is that no customer is at a disadvantage any more than any other customer. The only thing Breathing Color can do is treat everyone fairly and offer the same opportunities to everyone. Therefore, if you feel that our current promotion is a valuable promotion, then we encourage you to take advantage of it just like everybody else regardless of whether you just made a purchase or not.

The only way to really lose on any promotion is to not take advantage of it at all.

How to Install ICC Profiles on Windows Vista:

1. Save the .ICC profile to your desktop.
2. Right-Click the ICC profile and select: "Install Profile."
3. Right-Click the ICC profile again, and select: "Copy."

*Now you are going to paste this .ICC file into a Windows file directory. Here is where you will need to to go:

1. Click: "My Computer."
2. Open your Hard Drive (C:)
3. Open the folder labeled: "Windows."
4. Open the folder labeled: "System 32."
5. Open the folder labeled: "Spool."
6. Open the folder labeled: "Drivers."
7. Open the folder labeled: "Color."
8. Paste the .ICC profile into the "Color" folder.

[ C:\Windows\system32\spool\drivers\color ]

*If you have Adobe Photoshop running, close it and restart the application. Once Adobe Photoshop is restarted, the new profile(s) will appear in the proper dialogues. If you still do not see your .ICC profiles please contact Breathing Color at: 1-866-722-6567.

Cold conditions can cause the canvas to become more brittle, especially coupled with the low humidity levels many regions see during the winter months. However, the cold storage shouldn't do any harm to the canvas as long as the rolls remain in their original packaging and are allowed to acclimate to the printing environment for 24-48 hours before being used. Printmakers should use a first in, first out method to rotate the inventory in their print room.

An unwrapped roll will be much more susceptible to problems as fluctuation in ambient humidity can cause serious problems. Best to keep the rolls wrapped in the original packaging whenever not in use.

The best way to protect coated prints when stacking or sending out to ship would be to wrap the print in Glassine paper. You do not want to separate your prints with paper that contains acid in it. If acid comes into contact with your print it may cause the print to turn yellow. You can find many different types of Glassine papers online, or at your nearest art supply store. The main thing to keep in mind when looking for this type of paper is to make sure the paper has a neutral pH level, or acid free.

Yes, Breathing Color has a Quality Certificate for the Chromata White Canvas:

http://bit.ly/294JNUz

There are a couple different techniques that you can use to acquire a matte finish using our varnish. First off which would be to apply a thin coat of gloss varnish first. Please wait for it to become fully dry before taking the next step. After the print has dried, you can apply a heavy coat of matte over the first thin gloss base coat. This should give it a matte finish when it has completed drying.

Another method would be to mix the varnish together. Glamour II Gloss and Glamour II Matte are 100% compatible with each other. A good gloss-to-matte ratio would be 20% gloss - 80% matte.

This process may require some trial and error to find what ratio best suits your prints. However, 20% gloss and 80% matte seems to be a an average ratio for matte finishes.

Once you have found your desired ratio, it would be a good idea to invest in a graduated cylinder (the glass instrument use to measure fluids). This will make it very easy to maintain the exact same coating ratio for all of your prints.

Yes, Glamour II is 100% compatible with Acrylic gels. After you have coated your print with Glamour II, please allow the print 24 hours of dry time before applying the acrylic gel.

Since the Epson 4000 printer has the capability to print both photo or matte black inks, the instructions you see on the page are for matte black inks. We recommend using matte black ink settings for Breathing Color products. If you have any other questions regarding profile installation or setup, please send an email to support@breathingcolor.com.

Our support department will be glad to help you out with any technical support questions.

Breathing Color uses 3 different shipping methods for our customers in Hawaii. We can send your products UPS, FEDEX, or DHX. To get the cheapest shipping rate you would go with DHX which has the ability to use ocean freight. It is the cheapest but will take the most time to get to you. If you know what you want to order ahead of time, it is a good idea to place your order 3-4 weeks in advance to keep your shipping rates low as possible by going DHX ocean freight.

To receive additional information about products or shipping methods please call us on our toll free number 1-866-72-COLOR and speak with a Breathing Color Media Specialist.

The reason why you are not finding any photo paper products on the Breathing Color website is because Breathing Color has discontinued that line of media. However we do still have remaining rolls left that we offer to existing Breathing Color customers at discounted prices from 35% - 40% off normal price. To get an updated inventory count of remaining rolls, please call us on our toll free number 1-866-72-COLOR and speak with Breathing Color sales representative who will let what we have in stock.

We have listed the files profiles you will need for our products off of the Colorbyte website. We have also included all of the different lighting settings for your rip software.

Brilliance Chromata White:
ep4000mk6BrthBCWC1440_ECWF.icm
ep4000mk6BrthBCWC1440_EDAY.icm

Elegance Velvet Platinum & Optica One:
ep4000mkBrthElegn1440_ECWF.icm
ep4000mkBrthElegn1440_EDAY.icm
ep4000mkBrthElegn1440_ETUNG.icm
ep4000mkBrthElegn1440_F2.icm
ep4000mkBrthElegn1440_F3.icm

*You can use the Elegance Velvet profile for Optica One, however after running test prints with the profile applied, if the color is still not up to par, please contact Colorbyte and request a custom ICC profile to be built for your specific media. Breathing Color CANNOT produce profiles for Colorbyte's Rip Software.

ep4000mk6BrthBCWC1440_ETUNG.icm
ep4000mk6BrthBCWC1440_F2.icm
ep4000mk6BrthBCWC1440_F3.icm

At Breathing Color we normally use a standard razor blade to cut the canvas off the roll and then bring it to a cutting table that has a razor blade on a ball bearing system. We've found razor blades work far better than normal scissors.

It is possible that your ISP provider or email program has an automated spam filter activated. Here are some solutions to disable that feature for different types of email programs / ISP providers:

Many Internet Service Providers (ISP) such as AOL, Yahoo and MSN Hotmail have SPAM filters to give you greater control over what e-mails reach your inbox to help you avoid unwanted junk e-mail. Unfortunately, these filters can block e-mails you wish to receive from Breathing Color unless you add store@breathingcolor.com to your e-mail address book and/or update your e-mail program's white list or filters.

Below are instructions for the most common ISP or e-mail programs. (Different versions may have slight variations to the steps)

AOL Subscribers:
1. From your mailbox screen click on the drop down arrow to the right of the 'Mail Options' and then click on 'Address Book'.
2. Click the 'Add' button ('Add Contact' for version 8.0).
3. Type in or cut and paste store@breathingcolor.com into the 'Screen Name' block and then click 'Save'.

Juno/Netzero Subscribers:
1. From your mailbox screen click on the 'Address Book' tab.
2. Next to the 'Lists' tab click the 'Add new contact' link.
3. Type in or cut and paste store@breathingcolor.com into the 'E-mail Address' block, and then click the 'Save' button.

Earthlink Webmail Subscribers:
1. From your mailbox screen click on the 'Address Book'.
2. Click the 'Add' button.
3. Type in or cut and paste store@breathingcolor.com into the 'E-mail' block and then click the 'Save' button.

Hotmail Subscribers:
1. Select the 'Options' links in the upper right of the screen.
2. Click on 'Contacts' link on the left part of the screen.
3. Click on 'Safe List'.
4. Type in or cut and paste store@breathingcolor.com into the box and then click 'Add'.

Yahoo Subscribers:
1. From your mailbox screen click on the drop down arrow to the right of the 'Addresses' and then click on 'Add Contact'.
2. Type in or cut and paste store@breathingcolor.com into the 'E-mail' box and then click 'Save'.

G-mail Subscribers:
1. From your mailbox, select 'Filters tab.
2. Select 'Create a Filter'.
3. Type in or cut and paste store@breathingcolor.com in the 'From' field.
4. Set 'Choose Action' to be 'Star it'.

Microsoft Outlook (most versions):
1. From your 'Inbox', select 'File' 'New' and then 'Contact'.
2. Create a contact in your address book for store@breathingcolor.com (Copy email address into the 'E-mail' field and click 'Save and Close' button).
3. From your Inbox select 'Tools' then select 'Organize'.
4. In 'Ways to Organize Inbox', select 'Using Folders'.
5. Create a rule to move new messages store@breathingcolor.com to 'Inbox' and then click the 'Create' button.
6. Click the 'X' in the upper right section when done to close the dialogue box and return to Outlook.

When using any paper that is over 280 gram, you are going to want to turn up the paper suction. The "Paper Suction" control can been found in your Epson driver under "Paper Configuration." Turning up the suction will hold the paper firmly to the bottom of the printer and stop and rubbing you are getting on your Epson printer heads.

Brilliance Chromata White: CANVAS MATTE

Elegance Velvet Platinum: TEXTURED WATERCOLOR PAPER

Optica One: WATERCOLOR PAPER

The recommended water to varnish ratio is: 30% distilled water and 70% coating. It is very important that you distilled water, rather that tap or drinking water. The minerals added to drinking water will effect the integrity of the coating. Before mixing the water into the varnish, heat up the water in the microwave. Heating up the distilled water will help improve the effect of the self level agents leaving your print with no roller streaks. It is always safe to have less water than coating. A major problem with coating canvas is users over diluting the coating.

Air bubbles can be caused by a variety of things. Breathing Color has tested every single possible variable to the foam rolling process of coating. Most of the time bubbles in the print are caused by "under rolling." You want to cover your print by going in multiple directions, not just one. The canvas has to "drink" the coating in. If you see bubbles at the start of your coating process, it is the canvas sucking the coating into the print. The desired dilution ratio of water to coating is 30% water 70% coating. There has been cases of bubbles forming from over diluted coating. Please allow the canvas 24 hours of dry time as well. After 24 hours when you come back to your print, you will notice that the bubbles have disappeared.

Breathing Color is only going to be producing Optica One in the 17" and above size rolls.

We would recommend using gator board rather than Masonite. The main reason being Masonite has been known to warp, gator board is a lot more consistent, and you will not run into a problem getting the Glamour II to adhere to the gator board.

A great method is the front load, but the head isn't "focused" if you use this method. To fix this you are going to need to make the media "thicker." The canvas we carry is 21 mils thick, so we need twice than and then some. We have found that we also need something stiff to support the canvas. A great solution is to load the sheet of canvas along with the a piece of cardboard 13" wide on the bottom of the stack of sheets. Your goal is to get to 47 mils, which is more than double the thickness of a single sheet of Brilliance Chromata White. We recommend using the cardboard as a form of support on the bottom, along with 3-4 sheets.

Breathing Color has discontinued the production on Chromata White in sheet form.

The reason why you cannot purchase rolls in this size is because Breathing Color has discontiuned 13 inch roll size for Elegance Velvet Platinum.

The reason why you cannot buy 13 inch rolls of Chromata White is because we have discontinued this size roll.

If you hare having problems printing Brilliance Chromata White with either the Epson 7600 or 9600 regarding the "Reload Paper" dialog, there are settings that may need to be changed to fix this problem.

1. If you have the Platen Gap set to WIDEST change it to WIDE
2. Edit the setting on the printer to turn off "Paper Size Check" - PPR SIZE CHK = OFF
3. Within your printer driver configure the "Paper Suction" to -1

Because Chromata White Inkjet Canvas is a cotton/poly blend, when it comes in contact with our water based Glamour II Veneer liquid laminate, some shrinkage of the canvas may occur. This is due to the reaction of the cotton when introduced to the water content in water based coatings. Since our inkjet canvas is not 100% cotton, shrinkage is minimal. When shrinkage does occur, the canvas tends to shrink only in one direction and usually it will shrink the exact same amount every time coating is applied, relative to print size. To control for canvas shrinkage, try to stretch each print within a few days after the print has been coated. Also, because the shrinkage will be less than one inch and very consistent, you can also make the adjustment and account for the shrinkage in Photoshop or in your RIP software.

Here are the optimal Platen Gap settings for our media:

Brilliance Chromata White: WIDEST
Optica One: WIDER
Elegance Velvet Platinum: WIDER

In your "Printer Preferences," make sure the platen gap is set to 15. Also, you want to make sure on your printer, the controls on the printer itself, that the platen gap is set to WIDE.

Optimal drying conditions for our Glamour II would be 65 degrees or higher and 60% relative humidity or lower. Also keep in mind it is always a good idea to have a low dust drying environment. It is not a good idea to have any type of fan on while drying varnish. If you have a high ceiling or cannot control the temperature at night, when out of the studio/office, space heaters can be used to boost the average temperature and should not effect the integrity of the product.

The reason why you are not seeing these profiles on our website is because these products are being discontinued. Please send any discontinued ICC profile requests and/or targets to support@breathingcolor.com.

There are a couple different acceptable methods for switching between black inks in your Epson printer. If you haven't already, you may want to contact your Epson Dealer and speak with a representative and hear what they recommend. Another valuable resource for you will be message boards and discussion forums related to Epson wide-format printers. Here you can search for information on this topic and others to gain the tips, tricks, and advice from other Epson owners. Among these forums you may find that the Yahoo Group titled Epson Wide Format to be the most helpful and I am positive that this topic has been widely discussed.

http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/EpsonWideFormat/

Almost every problem that can occur with Glamour II, can be solved by using more of it. If you are experiencing cracking, chances are you did not use enough of it. Therefore, make sure when spraying your prints, that you always use 2 heavy coats. Though Glamour II is temperature sensitive and is mildly susceptible to environmental conditions, your prints should never crack if you have applied enough Glamour II. When applying Glamour II with a foam roller, you still should be able to get away with one coat, but make sure you apply the Glamour II generously.

It often occurs that wemight not have a profile available for a specific printer/ink/paper combo.However, we do offer a free service to all of our customers, a free Custom ICCProfile.

If you follow the link in my post,our website will direct you on the proper steps to send us a printer out set oftargets from your very own printer. Once we receive these printed targets thatyou printed, you can expect your very own person profile emailed to you withina few hours!

http://www.breathingcolor.com/bc/catalog/index.php?cPath=1001

Since all canvases are very breathable, they are prone to a number of atmospheric variables. High relative humidity in a room, combined with hot temperatures can change the structure of your canvas. However there are solutions to this problem, one of which that is very effective, would be to take an already stretched print and spray the back of the print with distilled water. Make sure when you apply the water you're not soaking it, just enough to moisten it. You also may want to go through this process possibly more than once depending on how hot the lights really are. If you have an further questions please do not hesitate to contact on our sales representatives at 866-722-6567.

Here are the steps you would take to manually track down the file and delete it from your hard drive:

By using these steps you are going to be able to track down every file on your hard drive ending with the file extension of .ICC

1. Go to your desktop
2. Click the Start button
3. Click Search -> Files or Folders -> All Files and Folders -> All of part of the filename -> Type: *.ICC

Once you have located the file on your computer, you can choose to manually delete it, by right clicking the file and selecting delete. Or you could choose to leave it on your computer and go about downloading a new profile for your media. By default Photoshop will save all profiles to your hard drive, and have the option to select which profile you want to apply each time you run a print. If you have any further questions on how to install profiles be sure to check out our instructional video on ICC profiles. It goes into great detail on exact steps you will need to take to install an ICC Profile.

Many of our customers that use a smaller width printers have cut down the width of our rolls with using a band saw to cut the whole roll down to size. Also, some of customers prefer just to cut the roll into sheets, and then print. None of these methods will alter the integrity of the media.

You may have downloaded the wrong ICC Profile. If you have downloaded profiles for an Epson printer using MATTE black ink, and the "Watercolor Paper Radiant White" setting is unavailable, then you must be using PHOTO black ink.

Depending on what type of ink you are printing with, (matte or photo black ink) will determine what media type you will choose. Make sure you know this information before you download an ICC profile.

Like the older prints by Epson such as the Epson Stylus Pro 9800 and Epson Stylus Pro 7800, these new printers - the Epson 11880, Epson 9880, and Epson 7880 printers have 8-channel printheads. However, these new inkjet printers incorporate the new MicoPiezo AMC Printhead technology. These new heads are quite remarkable in that they have a new ink repelling coating technology which reduces head clogging and by simplifying the need for cleaning these new printheads are especially useful for dusty or linty papers, such as fine art papers or canvas. The printheads also offer more advanced Active Meniscus Control (AMC). Active Meniscus Control is intended to significantly improve dot regularity and dot placement. Although Active Meniscus Control technology was used in prior printer models (this is the third generation), the performance in the Epson 11880 is reported to be stunningly more than 100 times as accurate when compared to a model such as the Epson 9800.

In this Article we will take a closer look at the Epson 11880 Vivid Magenta Inkset. These are brand new ink cartridges designed for these new Epson Stylus Pro Series printers only. It is first important to note that these vivid magenta inkset cartridges are NOT compatible with older printer models such as the Epson Stylus Pro 9800 and Epson Stylus Pro 7800 . Although they will work, they are reported to ruin the print heads within a short period of time such as 6 months. Although this information has not been confirmed by a third party Epson user as of the date of this writing, it should be noted. Also note that we are only referring to the two vivid magenta cartridges; not the other colors which can be used interchangeably with other Epson Stylus Pro Series printer models.

Epson UltraChrome Ink Technology with Vivid Magenta * High-density pigments for an extremely wide color gamut * New formulation of Magenta pigments for extreme blues and purples * Professional print permanence ratings for truly sellable quality prints * High-gloss Microcrystal Encapsulation technology for reduced gloss differential * Superior scratch resistance from improved pigment and resin chemistry * Color is stable immediately after printing - no short-term color shifting * Produces a black density up to 2.55 with an L* value of 2.9*

Word on the street is that the Epson 11880 60 inch model will differ slightly than the smaller Epson 9880 44 inch, Epson 7880 24 inch, and Epson 4880 17 inch models. Apparently it will offer a higher quality print and possibly faster printing speed, therefore offering the wide format printer user added value in paying for the more expensive Epson 11880 printer.

Since the Epson 9880, Epson 7880, and Epson 4880 model printers have not reached the marketplace yet, they have not been evaluated and compared extensively. As soon as this information is available we will update this page. Check back periodically for more information on the new Epson Stylus Pro series inkjet printers.

An issue you may run into on our website when you are searching through items to place into your shopping cart might be the absence of the "Buy" button next to the item you have interest in. This simply means that product is currently unavailable. It could be out of stock, no longer in production in that size, or not available for purchase yet (beta testing).

If you believe there is an error and perhaps we do have that item available please call any one of our sales representatives and they would be more than willing to remedy the situation.

According to Epson, the new Epson 11880 printer will be announced on Tuesday July 17th. There is a lot of information currently going around about the Epson 11880 prior to its release, and the market is highly anticipating it.

We already know quite a few things about the Epson 11880 printer. First, it will be a 64" wide format printer. The Espon 11880 will have 360 nozzles per ink, and 9 lines on 1 inch wide head for nine pigmented inks. The nine color pigmented inks are Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, Light Cyan, Light Magenta, Light Black, Ultra Light Black, Photo Black and Matte Black. The Magenta ink is supposed to be a new formulation that Epson is calling "Vivid Magenta" which is supposed to deliver a noticeable improvement in color gamut. The Epson 11880 printer, with variabled-sized droplet technology, will deliver an astounding minimum ink droplet size of 3.5 picoliters. It will have automatic nozzle check. Cleaning can be for one or two inks only. The Epson 11880 will have a switch for high tension on the roll spindle. The ink cartridges will be 700ml. There will also be a new magenta and light magenta ink, which is supposed to improve dark blues when printed on glossy inkjet papers or glossy inkjet canvas. The Epson Stylus Pro 11880 will have specially reformulated inks that deliver significantly improved color gamut. Furthermore, the Epson 11880, as well as its smaller width siblings which will be released shortly after, the Epson 9880 (44"), Epson 7880 (24"), Epson 4880 (17"), will allow for a technician fitted internal spectrophetometer installation which should cost around $1,500 USD.

Another interesting move with Epson is their plan to launch MyEpsonprinter.eu. MyEpsonprinter.eu will be an online portal that allows Epson 11880 users to retrieve up-to-the-minute technical information. Furthermore, Epson 11880 users will be able to monitor the activity and performance of each Epson wide format printer, such as print job activity, historical data of past print jobs, etc. and even track the cost of owning the Epson 11880 and the cost per print. MyEpsonprinter.eu will be a completely secure website, and will have remote access capability so that service contractors can log on to the printer and from there quickly identify the cause and scope of almost any support related issues.

One major indication that Epson is going to release the Epson 11880 very soon as a print engine replacement for the Epson 9800, Epson 7800, and Epson 4800 printers is that they have introduced a substantial rebate program for these printers. The purpose of the rebate program is to help Epson distributors move these older printer models through the distribution channels in order to make room for the Epson 11880 and its smaller models.

Epson Ultrachome K2 and the Ultrachrome K3 inks for the Epson 9800, Epson 7800, and Epson 4800 printers can be very expensive when purchased at retail prices. It's important to note that while there are hundreds of Epson printer and Epson ink distributors nationwide, its equally important to know that at any given time at least one of these distributors is running a promotion where they are selling genuine Epson ink at near cost - which can be at least 30% below the original retail price (MSRP). Such promotions typically are not advertised because Epson does not approve of them and the distributor does not want to compromise their relationship with Epson and their ability to be an authorized reseller. However, the distributors do the promotion because they know that it will enable them to locate more users of Epson printers -- users who they can in turn sell more printers, ink, media, software, etc.

As a designer and supplier of our own proprietary digital inkjet canvas and fine art papers, we routinely service thousands upon thousands of Epson printmakers directly. Our relationships with these users on the ground level allows us to gather up-to-date information as it is released to the public. Therefore, when a certain distributor runs a promotion for genuine Epson ink, we are amongst the first to know about it. We can therefore use this information to direct our clients to where they can save the most money.

In order to find out where you can obtain the best deal on genuine Epson Ultrachrome and Epson Ultrachrome K3 ink, please call us at (866)722-6567 and speak with one of our representatives today.

For borderless printing, the Epson print engine enlarges the image size slightly (about 5 percent or a bit less) to ensure that the image is not printed with any white edges due to paper misalignment. You can minimize the clipping by resizing your image to actual paper size (e.g., 13" x 19", 4" x 6"), and then setting Print with Preview to center the image and print it at 96% of actual size. The clipping dialog still comes up (it will whenever you are printing in the printer's defined margins), but tell it OK. You can try using 95% if there is still too much clipping.

The Epson 9800, Epson 7800, and Epson 4800 printers (9600, 7600 also) do allow you to choose between using Photo Black or Matte Black. However, not only does it allow you to choose -- it basically forces to you choose because changing the inks later on will cost significantly you in ink, time, and resources. With this option in front of you, should you use Matte Black or Photo Black?

This is actually a very simply answer and we will explain it as simply as possible. The answer depends on your particular business. If you are a fine art printing company that will be primarily printing onto matte inkjet canvas and matte fine art papers, then you need to use matte black. When used on matte inkjet canvas or papers, the matte black is going to give you a much higher black density (called "Dmax", or black "pop"). The difference is significant. Even today you will find some printmakers naively using photo black inks and printing onto matte canvases or papers and selling them to artists as if they are "the best you can get". It is truly unbelievable. These people need to get with the times and either swap out the photo black cartridge or only print onto glossy substrates. The fine art printmaking industry is still very fragmented rather than centralized and organized in a yellow-pages like fashion, so some businesses are going to be able to get away with this incompatibility for some time. Needless to say, this really is a losing strategy in the competitive landscape. This is common knowledge to any self-respecting fine art printmaker, who has done enough due diligence to know that matte black ink should be used on matte substrates.

This doesn't mean the every single fine art printmaker must be using matte black ink. It's important to understand that if a fine art printmaker is printing onto a glossy inkjet canvas, he will want to use Photo Black ink instead. This is because the matte black ink is not micro-encapsulated and it will therefore not adhere well to glossy, luster, or semigloss coated papers or canvas. Glossy canvas, like glossy photo paper, is a glossy substrate and therefore photo black ink will also allow for the higher Dmax. This is why you will find many photo labs across the world using the Photo black ink cartridge -- they print on glossy substrates more often than not, and therefore need to have a printer using the Matte Black ink.

If the printmaker is going to then switch to printing on a matte fine art paper and he demands the highest quality standards, he will need to either switch out the photo black ink cartridge for the matte black, or have an additional printer set up with the photo black ink cartridge. Since the Epson printers are so inexpensive, most businesses these days simply keep an additional Epson 9800, Epson 7800, or Epson 4800 on hand with the opposite black ink cartridge.

Note that its the Photo Black ink that comes with your printer when you purchase it. If you want to use matte black right from the start, you need to request this cartridge.

If you have ever made a phone call to our technical support team odds are that you have heard one of us say "90% of problems experienced with Glamour II can be solved by using more Glamour II". It's true, dull or dry spots, pitting, pinholes, or streaking are signs that you need to make an adjustment to your coating procedures.

Example (Click Here)

When diluting Glamour II the key is to use the least amount of water possible. The less water that exists in your mixture the better. The only purpose of diluting Glamour II with water is to make it easier to work with and spread over prints. Too much water and the end result (after the water evaporates) is an uneven thin coat of Glamour II. The good news is that a second coat will almost always clear up all the problems from the first.

Tip 1 - Be very liberal with the coating. The more the better.

Tip 2 - Use the least amount of water possible when diluting.

Print Permanence Ratings are longevity tests performed by companies who have the equipment required to conduct accelerated light exposure tests, dark aging tests, and humidity tests. The purpose of the testing is to determine the life expectancy of a digital inkjet canvas or inkjet paper print before "deterioration" occurs. Common examples of deterioration include yellowing, staining, or fading.

To the dismay of their users (and trusting believers in the Print Permanence Rating), various inkjet papers with high print permanence ratings failed to meet their expectation and instead began deteriorating within months and in some cases days after being printed. How could this happen? It's very simple, actually. Once you begin scrutinizing the longevity testing method that gave the high rating, multiple flaws are evident. For example, while factors such as light might be tested for, other common environmental factors are left out, such as exposure to certain chemicals in carpets, stretcher bars, wrapping paper (we hope you don't wrap your finished prints in brown Kraft paper), boxes (such as the box your roll of paper or sheets came in), etc., etc. etc. In other words, Print Permanence Ratings are created "in a bubble". Unfortunately, printmakers don't have that luxury.

While it's true that scrutiny of these testing methods discovered a series of flaws in the process of developing and publishing a Print Permanence Rating, the purpose of this article is not to scrutinize these flaws nor witch hunt the messenger of the Print Permanence Rating. That would be a waste of time. Instead, the purpose of this article is to expose Print Permanence Ratings for what they really are -- a marketing tool. Should a product not live up to its rating, users need to understand that they will receive absolutely no recourse in some cases, not even a refund for the price of the roll or box of sheets purchased. Ratings are no guarantee of longevity. So first and foremost, don't be fooled into thinking that they provide any sort of financial guarantee to you or your business.

Every Print Permanence Rating is accompanied by a liability disclaimer from the product's manufacturer. Here is a common example:

Actual print stability and longevity will vary according to image, display conditions, light intensity, humidity, atmospheric conditions, ink, and post printing treatments. (Manufacturer name removed) does not guarantee stability or longevity. For maximum print life, display all prints under glass or lamination or properly store them.

You can find these disclaimers with every manufacturer or OEM in this industry. The bottom line is that Print Permanence Ratings are a marketing tool that encourage confident use but in reality provide absolutely no meat and potatoes for the consumer. Why? Because when your prints turn yellow, fade, stain, or deteriorate in any other way, and when your customers want their money back, after you spent thousands on ink and countless hours in production -- you simply won't be getting any recourse. Read the disclaimer again -- once you buy the product, you assume your own risk. So the next time your local supplier or any other supplier of inkjet goods tells you about a Print Permanence Rating or a guarantee, try qualifying it. Ask them to tell you exactly what recourse you will receive from them, or from the manufacturer, should the product fail to live up to its rating. You might be surprised to see just how many people in this industry are still fooled into thinking that some guarantee actually exists -- even the suppliers.

So the next obvious question is: Why won't canvas, paper, or ink manufacturers give us consumers a guarantee on longevity? The problem with providing a guarantee on any inkjet print is that there are just too many uncontrollable factors involved that can contribute to the deterioration of a print. As seen in the disclaimer posted above, examples of such factors include display conditions, exposure to UV light and its intensity, humidity, atmospheric conditions (let's be honest, this could include just about anything), ink, and post printing treatments. Other examples include exposure to certain chemicals in carpets, stretcher bars, wrapping paper (we hope you don't wrap your finished prints in brown Kraft paper), boxes (such as the box your roll of paper or sheets came in), etc. A manufacturer simply cannot control such a myriad of factors a consumer could so likely and even unknowingly expose a print to.

Given such numerous factors and potential hazards, it is easy to understand how Print Permanence Ratings in reality are created in a bubble Print Permanence Ratings are created in the perfect environment, in a controlled laboratory, with only select external conditions (such as light and humidity) -- and most importantly, the end goal of achieving the highest rating possible. The bottom line is that you will never achieve this rating in the real world, so don't be surprised when you don't. A Print Permanence Rating certainly doesn't tell you what to expect should you introduce other external conditions, such as exposure and/or contact with acidic cardboard or paper (a very common occurrence, unfortunately) for unspecified periods of time, or any other potential unmentioned pitfall. They simply don't address the consequences one can expect when such factors are introduced. So just because a product has a print permanence rating of say 90 years, in reality, history has proven that such a product could deteriorate within months or even days. It has happened before, and it will happen again.

All in all, the subject on Print Permanence Ratings ultimately brings us to question what consumers can do, or what factors they can control in order to maximize the longevity potential of their own inkjet prints. We will answer that question in the next article.

Epson UltraChrome K3 ink, used on the Epson 9800, Epson 7800, Epson 4800, can produce archival prints with amazing color fidelity, gloss level, and scratch resistance, while providing consistently stable colors that significantly outperform lesser ink technologies. This breakthrough ink technology also makes it the perfect choice for professional neutral and toned black and white prints with higher density levels and virtually no metamerism. Its value is apparent each time you print. What you save in dollars with third party (or compatible) ink cartridges, you could sacrifice in quality and performance. In independent testing, Epson ink cartridges produce superior image quality, longer print life, greater reliability and unbeatable value versus third party ink cartridges. But don't take our word for it. Industry experts and independent research prove not only that you get what you pay for," but with genuine Epson ink cartridges, you get substantially more. Superior Image Quality For prints as vivid as your memories. Epson ink cartridges are engineered to deliver stable, long-lasting, photographic quality. A recent PC World magazine article said, "We encountered third-party inks that produced poor quality prints." The article showed that none of the third party ink cartridges tested were able to deliver the consistent quality of Epson ink cartridges for photo printing. Longer Print Life For brilliant prints that last and last. Permanence, or how long a displayed print will last before noticeable fading, is where third party ink cartridges really pale in comparison to Epson ink cartridges. In a recent study, Henry Wilhelm, a leading authority on photo longevity, projected Epson inks to last for up to 92 years*, while third party inks printed on the same paper were projected to last no more than a year. Greater Reliability Because we value your time as much as you do. Epson ink cartridges deliver reliable and optimal print performance because they are designed to work with Epson printers. All ink jet printers use user-initiated cleaning cycles to clear any printhead clogs that may occur. With Epson printers, third party inks can clog the printhead nozzles more frequently, leading to more cleaning cycles. According to a study conducted by Torrey Pines Research, Epson ink cartridges require up to 25 times fewer user-initiated cleaning cycles than third party ink cartridges.* That adds up to considerable savings in time. Unbeatable Value More prints per cartridge. Torrey Pines Research stated that Epson ink cartridges "consistently outperformed third party ink brands" when it comes to the number of prints per cartridge. In fact, the study showed that the Epson ink cartridges produce up to 114 more pages per black ink cartridge and 19 more pages per color cartridge.* The number of pages printed using Epson ink cartridges is up to 30% more than the third party ink cartridges. Bottom line - more prints, more value. *Torrey Pines Research, test of Epson genuine ink vs. third party ink.

In addition to cyan, magenta, yellow, light cyan and light magenta, UltraChrome K3 features a special three-level black ink system that simultaneously uses black, light black and light-light black to create professional neutral and toned black and white prints from a single ink set. Epson UltraChrome K3 inks also boast output without color crossover or color casts. In addition to professional-quality black and white output, UltraChrome K3 produces higher degrees of color fidelity and stable colors superior to other ink technologies. K3 inks are available when using the Epson 9800, Epson 7800, and Epson 4800 printers.

Epson UltraChrome K3 Ink Technology - Unbelievable Color Gamut and Dmax when used with the right inkjet canvas and fine art paper

"Epson has a legacy of providing photographers and digital artists with the tools that enable them to express their vision. The Epson Stylus Photo R2400 and the new Epson UltraChrome K3 inks produce stunning color prints in addition to black and white prints that look and feel like traditional silver halide prints," said Patrick Chen, product manager, photo imaging, Epson America. "Quite simply, this printer with its Epson UltraChrome K3 inks will redefine photographic printing in the industry with the next level of uncompromising quality, ease of use and print permanence." Epson offers an extensive array of award-winning image capture and image output products for the consumer, business, photography and graphic arts markets. The company is also a leading supplier of value-added point-of-sale (POS) printers and transactions terminals for the retail market. Founded in 1975, Epson America Inc. is the U.S. affiliate of Japan-based Seiko Epson Corporation, a global manufacturer and supplier of high-quality technology products that meet customer demands for increased functionality, compactness, systems integration and energy efficiency. Epson America Inc. is headquartered in Long Beach, Calif.

The Epson 9800 printer offers users two unique ink modes - Photo Black and Matte Black - that are designed to optimize the level of black ink density on different types of media. The Photo Black ink mode can be selected to help maximize the deepness and richness of black tones on glossy/luster media such as Epson's Premium Luster. The Matte Black mode uses a different black density to maximize the deepness and richness of black tones on fine art surfaces such as Epson's Velvet Fine Art, Enhanced Matte and UltraSmooth Fine Art.

Epson 9800 Ink Jet printer - Professional Media Handling

The Epson Stylus Pro 9800 can handle virtually any type of media, either in rolls up to 44 inches wide or cut sheets between 8" x 10" and 17" x 22". Both cut-sheet and roll media are loaded via the printers' straight-through media path. An optional automatic take-up reel system is also available exclusively on the Epson Stylus Pro 9800 for unattended production of large print runs. There are four ways to load media, which include an adjustable roll feed for 2-inch and 3-inch cores, a high-capacity cut-sheet tray for up to 50 sheets of photographic media, top manual feed, and straight-through front manual feed capable of handling up to 1.5-millimeter-thick poster board. The Epson Stylus Pro 9800 also supports printing on both sides of the media without damaging the previously printed side and has a built-in media cutter that automatically trims top and bottom edges of roll media safely and accurately to produce full-bleed images on all four sides.

Epson 9800 printer - Intelligent High-Capacity Ink technology

Each of these new printers' ink cartridge channels/slots can handle either 110 ml or 220 ml cartridges (or a combination of both sizes) that can even be replaced in the middle of a print job. Each cartridge uses Epson's Intelligent High-Capacity Ink technology, a feature that stores a variety of information on a memory chip and communicates the data to the printer whenever the power is turned on. Also, the printers use built-in memory to track key print job statistics such as ink levels, ink usage, remaining media, print times, data file names, user names and print dates.

The Epson 9800 printer Ink Jet Printer with New Epson UltraChrome K3 Inks mark defining moment in history of photography and professional graphics new professional Wide-Format printer use color and unique Three-Level Black Ink System to create highest quality archival black and white images. Epson is once again advancing its printing technology into new territory for professional photographers and graphic artists with the launch of the Epson Stylus Pro 9800, and new Epson UltraChrome K3 ink technology. The combination of this new printer and archival inks not only gives today's most demanding professionals an almost infinite degree of black and white image control.

Stylus Pro 9800 - No limitations

"By combining the high-precision of a new Epson Stylus Pro print engine with the extraordinary performance of Epson UltraChrome K3 ink technology, today's most discerning creative professionals have the tools to express their true creative visions," said Mark Radogna, group product manager, professional graphics, Epson. "Whether an artist's goal is to create the best exhibit-quality color prints possible or world-class black and white photography, their only limitations will be talent and imagination."

Epson 9800 - A Fast Inkjet Printer

Epson's new high-performance, one-inch wide print head features 180 nozzles per channel and can achieve resolution levels up to 2880 x 1440 dpi with variable-sized ink droplets as small as 3.5 picoliters. The Epson Stylus Pro 9800 offer print speeds approximately two times faster than his predecessor, the Epson Stylus Pro 9600. Photo lab-quality 44" x 60" prints can be printed in approximately 42 minutes, 30 seconds (using 1,440 x 720 dpi - HS mode). Epson has enhanced its manufacturing process to include colorimetric calibration. A technology called Epson PreciseColor evaluates each printer's output during the manufacturing process and automatically fine tunes each printer's settings to ensure consistent color output from one printer to the next. Setup time is also greatly reduced by a built-in auto head alignment feature. This technology uses a built-in white beam sensor that automatically scans printed alignment patterns created by the printer and then makes automated adjustments if necessary. The same white beam sensor is also used to detect clogged nozzles and automatically activate head cleaning cycles if necessary.

Epson Stylus Pro 9800 printer - Increased image quality

Inspired by Epson's past generations of pigmented inks, Epson UltraChrome K3 uses higher density pigments designed to increase image quality for both professional color and black and white prints. In addition to cyan, magenta, yellow, light cyan and light magenta, Epson UltraChrome K3 features a unique three-level black ink system that simultaneously uses black, light black and light-light black inks. This technology is designed to create professional neutral and toned black and white prints without color crossover or color casts. It also reduces the effects of metamerism or bronzing often associated with basic pigment chemistry. Furthermore, Epson's proprietary driver and screening technology offer users a unique method for converting color digital images into professional quality black and white prints. Epson UltraChrome K3 also produces higher degrees of color fidelity and uses a new high-gloss Microcrystal Encapsulation resin chemistry to create prints with greater scratch resistance and reduced gloss differential. These prints are rated to resist fading up to 108 years for color prints and more than 200 years for black and white prints on specific Epson papers.

Economically pre-cut sheets raise prices dramatically compared to media sold by the roll. On the manufacturing side, sheets go through many more steps and processes, inadvertently causing drastic price increases. If you have a small format printer and want to try one of Breathing Color's products at this point in time, we recommend purchasing a roll and cutting it down into sheets. This is easy to do and can be very cost effective since the costs per square foot of rolls are much cheaper than sheets.

The reason that 100% Pure Silk is not found on our website any longer is because we have fully discontinued this product line. Breathing Color Inc is still in the development stages of Inkjet Fabric printing. Please check back often for updates and news on new products coming out in the near future!

866-722-6567
Breathing Color Support
http://www.breathingcolor.com/support

We finally connected the dots on how to best print Vibrance Gloss with Matte Black Ink to avoid flat black areas. We just returned from Dan Margulis' Applied Color Theory workshop in San Diego. He taught us how to adjust an image for proper shadow detail for pre-press applications which is to work in CMYK color space and curve the inks in the shadow areas to carry no more than 300 percent ink. The formula that insures that shadows will not plug in CMYK is 80, 70, 70, 70. When we adjusted a clients shadows for 80,70,70,70 the image printed without the annoying flat black areas that occur at higher ink saturations. We're finding that several of our photography clients like to super saturate their images and their black ink levels are measuring at all the CMYK levels are measuring near or at 100.

If your prints are going magenta it could be a number of reasons:

1. It could be a clogged head, in which case you should run a head cleaning on your printer.
2. Double check that you are selecting No Color Adjustment" if not, the software will try to color correct the image.
3. The file the image is in may have a magenta cast.
4. Lastly you may have a profile that is not working for your printer. If this is the case please print the ICC targets you can download from our web site and send them to use. We can custom create a profile for you free of cost.

Canvas in general is not a very consistent product. Every manufacturer does their best to control inconsistencies, but despite their efforts, canvas is still not perfect, primarily because there are a lot of variables involved in canvas production. For example, if you were to line up every lot of Chromata White Canvas, although slight, each Lot would look slightly different in whiteness, texture, etc. The same goes for every other canvas manufacturer in this industry and with a little research you would find that Breathing Color's Chromata White Canvas, though still not perfect, is the MOST consistent canvas at this stage in the industry.

The coupons that come in Breathing Color's Sample Pack are for the first purchase of any product you have not already bought. For example, if you have purchased a trial roll of our Chromata White Canvas you will not receive the coupon discount since you have already tried the product. The coupons do not apply to trial rolls, trial kits, or pints since these products are already heavily discounted for trial purposes.

If you want to take advantage of the Sample Pack offer please feel free to call Breathing Color and ask for a Media Representative.

The shrinkage of your image on the canvas has nothing to do with the canvas. The problem you have described is mostly likely caused by your printer and driver. The simple solution to avoiding this problem is to add the extra 1/2" to your initial dimensions. For example, if your image is 38"x58" you would want to enter your dimensions as 38"x58.5". However, having that said, you should not have any problems with shrinkage using Breathing Color's Chromata White Inkjet Canvas.

The Vitality Banner does not necessary need to be coated. We do however recommend the Glamour II Coating simply for the purpose of adding additional protection from the elements. The Glamour II Coating can provide protection from UV light, moisture, and abrasion, as well as provide increased color density.

We highly recommend sending in printed ICC Targets so we can custom create ICC Profiles for you printer and Qimage software. Instructions and the ICC Targets have been attached to this response, if you are unable to download the attachments a link to our web site has been provided below. Since our technicians are unfamiliar with the Qimage software you may have to deviate from the instructions and create your own setting for us to create your custom ICC Profiles. When you do this, make sure you write down the exact settings you used to print these targets. When we send you back the ICC Profile, you are going to need to use these exact settings--without any error or oversight--every single time, in order to get the right results. This is how ICC Profiles are used. Please note that our ICC profiling service is provided free of cost to our customers.

Web link:
http://www.breathingcolor.com/bc/catalog/index.php?cPath=1001

The printable side of our Elegance Velvet Fine Art Paper is the slightly smoother, less textured side of the paper. This is the side that has the ink jet receptive coating on it.

Any of the ICC profiles listed under our Sterling 300g will be compatible with our Sterling Decor 280g Fine Art Paper. This is the same fine art paper with a lighter weight. If for some reason you are not getting the color quality with one of the ICC profiles provided on our website, please download and print the ICC targets we offer online, send them to us and we will custom create a profile for you. This is a service we provide to all our customers free of cost.

Glamour II Veneer is a practically odorless water-based coating that can be applied in a closed room. It is NOT a solvent-based coating which in contrast are extremely hazardous and emit very strong odors. If you are more sensitive to chemicals and odors, or are generally concerned with health, then we would always recommend using a mask when applying any coating from any manufacturer -- just to be on the safe side.

If an inkjet canvas cracks or tears when stretched over frames this is simply unacceptable and should serve as a huge red flag. If a canvas shows that it will crack, however slightly, when stretched over frames, you can be assured that this print will continue to crack and deteriorate over time. The bottom line is that your inkjet canvas and your liquid lamination coating are not specifically made to compliment one another. Furthermore, using them any longer than you are is only putting your prints and your business at risk. Unfortunately this young industry is flooded with inkjet suppliers who confidently sell canvas and coating combinations to fine art printmakers that, simply put, crack right in front of your eyes when minimal resistance is applied and/or when only a short period of time has elapsed.

Our Chromata White Canvas, when coated with our water-based liquid lamination product called Glamour II Veneer, will absolutely NEVER crack or tear. The combination of the two products results in the highest quality canvas and coating combination in the fine art industry. Prior to release, both products were rigorously and specifically tested to ensure maximized longevity and to address this apparent void in the industry.

Right now we are working on getting every possible ICC profile for every inkjet printer. If we do not have the ICC profile you need by the time that you get that inkjet printer, we can make a custom ICC profile for you. All you need to do is print out to color targets that are very easily downloaded from our website and mail them into us and within 48 hours we can email your ICC profile to you. This ICC profile will be made specifically for your inkjet printer so it will work the best.

Unlike all other 100% Cotton Rag Semi-Gloss Inkjet Fine Art Papers available today, Allure Rag Fine Art Paper is made to be compatible with both Matte Black and Photo Black inks from Epson, both Ultrachrome and K3. Profiles are available on our web site.

If you are printing on Allure Rag, we recommend using photo black inks to get the deepest blacks (D-max over 2.0 on this paper) and widest color gamut.

You need to make sure that 3 of the items in your cart ARE NOT trial rolls, pints, or kits. Trial rolls, kits, and pints are not considered "hot-items" because they are already heavily discounted specifically to encourage trial. They will not be discounted any further. However, if 3 of your 5 items are regular sized rolls or sheet boxes, you will receive the 3-item discount on all of those items.

For testing and evaluation, we offer short trial rolls of all of our inkjet canvas, inkjet fine art paper, inkjet decor paper, and inkjet signage products that are sold at cost. Typically, trial rolls are 17"x20 feet. The purpose for this is to allow our customers to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of our products, cost effectively. There are several steps that should be taken when testing any new digital substrate for your printing business.

1. The substrate should be tested with several different images to be sure the product performs well with everything image-type that you intend to use it for (try a portrait photograph, a vibrant fine art print, a black & white piece, etc.). Make sure you are selecting images that are fairly different from one another with respect to color and tonal gradation for a thorough evaluation.

2. Show a few of your most important customers a print of their own work on the media you are testing. Maybe provide an example of your current media to illustrate a comparison. Explain the physical and archival attributes of the new substrate and the reasons that you are considering a switch. It is the printmakers job to educate their artists about all things printing-related, especially media.

3. Trial rolls provide enough media to create custom profiles, for those who are capable. Breathing Color also offers a free custom profile service, which requires approximately two square feet of printed media.

4. It is important to have enough media to leave a margin for error in case the first attempt had not been printed correctly (print settings, profile, platen gap, etc.).

5. For inkjet canvas: coating, stretching, and hand embellishment should also be tested.

In addition to trial rolls, Breathing Color offers a complimentary sample pack, which includes printed samples of all available fine art products, with any order (limit one per customer). These sample packs can be purchased separately for $19.95.

Yes we have just added 3 brand new Cannon 8100 Profiles to our "downloads" section.

Profiles include:

Elegance Velvet Platinum
Brilliance Chromata White
Optica One

Dilute more. If you dilute less than 30% with water, the more likely this is to happen. If you are diluting with 30% already, try 40% or even 50% to reduce tackiness. Make sure the coating has completely dried and is no longer sticky before storing prints face-to-face or putting them behind a temporary frame that you ultimately intend to remove. Also try using a thinner coat. If you are using too much product, this could happen.

Glamour II Veneer giclee coating has been known to work with various artist paints for embellishment, however it is always recommended that you perform a test with a small scrap of coated canvas to avoid a negative reaction.

Glamour II Veneer giclee coating can be rolled on with a dense foam roller, sprayed on with an HVLP gun (50% dilution), or used with a roll coating machine (50% dilution).

When rolling Glamour II Veneer you are going to want to dilute it down 25%-30% with warm distilled water. You can apply the glamour directly to the print, and then immediately start to roll the Glamour II onto the canvas. Do not apply pressure to the roller, and make multiple passes in opposite directions. A good way to know if you are almost done rolling, is to listen for the "sticky" sound of the Glamour II. This means that the coating has been worked into the canvas and is starting to dry. The more time you spend working the Glamour II into the canvas, the faster it will dry and the better your print will look. Please allow at least a full 24 hours for your print to dry.

How to change the photo/matte ink in the Epson 7600 and 9600 printers without using the costly Epson draining procedure:

1 Make sure your printer is not switched on

2 - Open the ink cartridge lever in the ink cartridge bay

3 - Replace the photo black cartridge with the matte black cartridge (or vice versa)

4 - Leave the ink lever open !

5 - Using the printer control panel go into Maintenance Mode2 by switching power ON while pushing the 'Paper source', 'Cut/Eject',and 'Paper Feed down' buttons.

6 - Press the 'Paper Feed down' button until you see "SERVICECONFIG" on the display - press the 'arrow right' button. It then shows 'XXD' in the lower part of the display.

7 - Press the 'Paper Feed down' button until you see "NPD" -press 'arrow right' button. A value of '1' appears in the display.

8 - There are 3 possible value settings for NPD:

0 - No ink check

1 - Pigmented ink (there should be s star "*" at this setting)

2 - Dye inks

9 - Change NPD setting to '0' (no ink check) and press "Enter" -a star should now show next to the '0' value

10 -Switch printer off

11 - Switch printer on

12 - Close the ink lever in the ink cartridge bay

13 - Printer and driver shows the matte black ink is installed (or photo black ink)

You can use the same procedure to switch from matte black to photo black or from photo black to matte black. What happens is that once you change the ink in that way the printer re-sets the 'NPD' value back to '1' the next time you switch on the printer in the normal way (non maintenance mode).

The HP Designjet Z2100 Photo Printer (24" and 44"models) is an 8-ink wide-format printer, similar in ink technology tothe 13-inch wide HP B9180.However, where the B9180 has a built in densitometer, the HP Z2100 goesone better, with the first-ever embedded spectrophotometer -- allowingone to easily create and edit ICC profiles, saving one the time andexpense of outsourcing the ICC creation. The Z2100 24" model has a listprice of $3,395.00, and the Z2100 44" model has a list price of $5,595.

TheHP Designjet Z3100 Photo Printer (24" and 44" models) is a 12-inkwide-format printer, available with the same embedded spectrophotometertechnology as the Z2100. This 12-ink printer includes the HP 70 GlossEnhancer, producing a more uniform gloss (less gloss differential) onglossy, semi-gloss and luster surface photo papers. The inkset alsoincludes the HP Quad-Black Inks to create beautiful black and whiteprints and achieve truly neutral greys under different lightingconditions. This printer series will not be available until December2006, and no pricing has been published yet in the U.S.

Bothprinter series use the Vivera pigment inks which deliver exceptionalfade resistance, producing prints that resist fading for over 200 years(certified by Wilhelm Imaging Research), and on a range of HP creativeand specialty media.

For more information on this inkjet printer please visit the Giclee Printer Review

What makes art sell? Why are some artists making millions of dollars while others struggling to afford paint brushes? While there are many factors involved in the prosperity of one artist to another, by far the most critical is the aesthetic appeal the artwork itself. Simply put, the more visually appealing a particular work of art is, the better it will sell. Whether art is being shown as originals or prints, in a gallery or at an art show, the consumer is primarily influenced by the visual appeal of their prospective purchase and subsequently, its perceived value. Publishers, printmakers, framers, gallery owners, and of course the artists themselves all (directly or indirectly) profit from art sales. Collectively they share a common goal of selling art; while individually they strive to create a rich environment for art sales to take place, at the greatest possible rate. The artist creates the most visually appealing rendition of their art possible so consumers will be drawn to it, the publisher prints the best possible catalog to increase exposure and prestige; framer matches the art with a frame that becomes an visual extension of the painting, and the printmaker produces the most vibrant, accurate, and sellable print possible through equipment selection, experience, and talent. While each of these players is involved in the overall sell-ability of art, the purpose of this article is to focus on the printmaker and his/her influence on the visual appeal of a fine art reproduction.As a printmaker there are an overwhelming amount of variables involved in reproducing a sellable print. Aside from experience, knowledge, and raw talent, which are extremely important, a profitable printmaker learns to intelligently blend controllable variables with uncontrollable variables to reproduce the best possible prints. Controllable variables are aspects of the process that can be objectively defined in absolutes values. For example, a printmaker can determine the absolute highest black density (Dmax) or widest color gamut that a particular substrate or ink is able to achieve, thus creating the most visually appealing print. These data are measurable facts, not a matter of opinion. Uncontrollable variables are also a key contributing factor in creating the visual appeal and sale-ability of an art reproduction. Unlike the controllable variables, these rely primarily on subjective opinions such as media weight, thickness, white-point, texture, and substrate type. While many artists have preconceived preferences, the most successful printmakers are those who influence this process with personal experience and industry knowledge of market trends. Mark Leftoff, President of Gallery Street (www.gallerystreet.com) in Atlanta, GA provides some recommendation on how to add as some objectivity to this process.

First, select a media type and finish that, based upon the history of successful art pieces, will best suit a particular image. We typically recommend canvas first because with a higher perceived value to the end consumer, it can be sold at a higher price or in greater volume which in turn creates more financial reward for our customers. If a customer prefers to use matte fine art paper, we may even print some small swatches on different media in order to find a fit for their image that we all believe will result in the most success. We encourage our customers to test market these samples by getting some opinions from a handful of their own customers who will be buying the art. We believe that by including more professionals in the process we can minimize risk and more accurately assess the marketability of every print. It is in this manner that we work alongside our customers and together make educated business decisions on how to select the best media for every print job.

The most successful printmakers typically select a standard in house media based upon objective testing and industry experience. Most have chosen a smooth paper, a velvet finish paper, a heavily textured paper, and a canvas or two. A couple of different weights and finish are usually offered as well. This enables them to accurately match the proper media type, texture and weight, with a particular image to maximize sell-ability. It is also important for the artist to offer a couple of different options to their prospective art buyers/gallery owners to determine the most sellable option. When selecting which brand of media to permanently offer to their artists, these decisions are based upon controllable variables or hard facts such as determining which substrate produces the best colors, the best blacks, shows the best detail, and will last the longest.

By far the most important considerations in using any given fine art media on the market are color and longevity. This means that above all, our media must be measurably superior in achieving the widest color gamut and highest Dmax possible. In this business, color can make you or break you. This guarantees MFA Talon Graphics that the paper we are using produces the best color on our reproductions. Then we must consider how long the color will last without fading or yellowing. MFA Talon Graphics chooses fine art media from a equality in, quality out perspective. This is how we continually deliver on our promise to our customers, says Teddy Blah (Head Printmaker at MFA Talon Graphics of El Segundo, CA).

While many printmakers may wrestle with the decision of which media to stock, or learn through a process of trial and error, the most profitable and experienced printmakers understand one important fact art sells based upon how it looks. Those who offer a wide range of high-performance substrates and have the industry knowledge and market experience to suggest which substrate is most suitable or sellable with a particular image will be the most profitable. By offering substandard media or selecting the wrong substrate for a particular image, not only are you devaluing your own quality and expertise as a printmaker, but also that of the artists themselves. This will inevitably result in the loss of printing business to a competitor. With the exponential growth of the printmaking industry, every competitive advantage must be pursued to ensure the prosperity of your small business. Therefore, the key to success as a fine art printmaker is to produce the most visually appealing, archival, and sellable prints possible.

Is 100% Cotton really worth the price? After all, how much does paper composition, weight, and feel really matter when our universal objective is selling more art? 200g, 250g, 300g, 350g.We happily pay more to use a heavier weight paper, but does a paper's weight affect an art buyer's purchase or does it just senselessly raise our production costs? Would not an art buyer make the same purchase if a lighter weight paper was used to exhibit the art? In reality, art buyers are not informed of any of these subjective attributes when purchases are made in galleries. The sizable majority of fine-art printed on paper, is typically framed and behind glass, where it may only be seen by the buyer - not felt. Additionally, art buyers are rarely aware of specific media attributes, such as weight and composition, as they are not often featured or displayed along with the art in its description. So, if end consumers are not influenced by the multitude of paper attributes so heavily marketed today, then why are we? If not to sell more art, what exactly are we spending all of this money for?

Printmakers and Self-Publishing Artists and Photographers are in the business of selling art. In order for this unique group of entrepreneurs to achieve lasting success, all of their sales and marketing strategies should serve the fundamental purpose of selling more art, at the highest possible profit margin. Output/print quality, customer service, advertising, business signage, marketing materials, etc. are examples of legitimate expenditures within the digital printmakers' most advantageous art sales strategy. Recognizing and implementing a good strategy is extremely important for small businesses, as it is a fundamental tool for increasing sales and profitability. Likewise, the ability to recognize and confront a bad strategy or one that does not increase sales, is a critically important process in facilitating long-term growth and stability for any small business.

A recent debate among the digital printmaking community is whether the prevailing use of expensive, 100% cotton-rag base-material (hereinafter referred to as "R" for "Rag") is good strategy now that far less-expensive, "quality-equivalent" alternatives exist. The debatable question is this: If quality-equivalent alternatives to R exist and are implemented, will they or will they not retain the same sales numbers? The only way to answer this question objectively is to find a quality-equivalent alternative to R, and then compare the measurable product-attributes that contribute to each particular product's sale-ability.

A good example of a "quality-equivalent alternative" is an archival alpha cellulose paper. Alpha cellulose is a high grade wood pulp that is acid and lignin free (hereinafter referred to as "AC"). It can typically be purchased at half the cost of R and in some cases even less than that. Because digital printmakers are recognizing the opportunity to cut their costs in half by using a quality-equivalent alternative to R, AC is rapidly gaining popularity. A specific AC paper may be considered a quality-equivalent to R, when its inkjet receptive coating can reproduce equal or better color-gamut, detail (dot precision/gain), and longevity by comparison.

It is a measurable fact that industry-leading AC papers can reproduce color and detail as well as industry-leading R papers. The explanation for this is simple; color gamut and detail are not determined by the base material, R or AC. Rather, these properties are solely determined by the inkjet receptive coating which can be applied to any base material/substrate. In fact, a number AC papers with equal or superior color-gamut and detail to R are already widely available.

The issue of longevity is also measurable and has been documented by well-known testing facilities namely the Wilhelm Research Institute. (http://www.wilhelm-research.com/pdf/WIR_Ep9600_2003_07_26.pdf) This page on Wilhelm's website suggests that base paper materials alone, are not a clear indicator of a paper's potential lifespan. For example, Epson's alpha cellulose, which is acid free, lignin free, buffered wood-pulp fine art paper called "Epson Watercolor Paper - Radiant White (Non-R)" has permanence results of greater than 98 years under glass, where as "Epson Velvet Fine Art Paper (R)" has permanence results of only 61 years under glass, and "Epson Somerset Velvet Fine Art Paper (R)" has permanence results of 62 years under glass.

The only seemingly relevant argument made in support of R, however subjective, is that R simply feels better in your hand. As a business owner you must ask yourself, does "feel" sell more art? It is not common practice for an art buyer to sample the "feel" before making an acquisition of a favored work of art, which is usually framed behind glass and was originally created to be visually stimulating and aesthetically pleasing to the eye, not the hand. Art buyers don't care about feeling art.they care about how it looks. They care about how the art will fit into their home or office. So if the art buyer does not buy based upon "feel", why should we create art based upon this criteria?

A self-publishing fine artist/photographer who may spend $20,000/year exclusively using R could cut this in half to $10,000/year using AC. This puts an additional $10,000/year in their pocket without effecting art sales. For this reason alone, printmakers as a whole should always strive to use Non-R unless R is specifically demanded by a customer and knowledge-based persuasion is not feasible.

Remember: The artists using AC are getting the same gallery placement and dollar value for their art as the artists using the more costly R. The only difference is that one of them is making a much higher profit margin from each sale.

EXAMPLE: COST COMPARISON

Two Products with Equivalent Color Reproduction and Dmax

SterlingT 300g Bright White (Made from Acid and Lignin Free Alpha Cellulose)

17" x 40' - $40.00 ($.69 per square foot)

24" x 40' - $55.00

44" x 40' - $102.00

Hahnemuhle Photo Rag 308 (Made from 100% Cotton Rag)

17" x 39' - $99.00 ($1.65 per sq. foot)

24" x 39' - $129.00

44" x 39' - $249.00

If you are selling fine art giclee prints your quality driven customers will demand using an acid-free pH-neutral archival inkjet fine art paper. Museums and fine artists with rigid standards will require this class of fine art paper. So if you are looking for a wide format media you can trust, Breathing Color fine art papers have become the most popular solution for fine art printmakers and publishers worldwide. For example, Breathing Color's Elegance Velvet Fine Art Paper, Elegance Textured Fine Art Paper, and Sterling 280g Smooth Fine Art Paper, are available in both sheets and rolls.

There are several good reasons to use the fine art papers available from Breathing Color. First and foremost, your business requires nothing less than the best quality paper available so that your customers are guaranteed to maximize potential color gamut and Dmax. Second, by buying direct from a fine art paper manufacturer, you can eliminate middleman distributors and save money in the process.

Cheap papers are suitable for normal printing for pictures to share with friends and family, and also have their use for proofing pictures you intend to print for sale or display on more expensive materials.

Choosing a Surface of a Fine Art Inkjet Paper

You may not like the particular inkjet fine art paper surfaces that you have tried thus far, which could have been the papers you received with your Epson printer. Although the range provided by, for example Epson, is large enough to be confusing, the fine art papers included in it actually only cover a fairly small range of what is available. Using fine art papers from a "third party manufacturer" gives you a much wider choice, including many different smooth and textured inkjet papers and shinier gloss finishes as well as some unusual materials including some non-paper surfaces including fabric such as an inkjet printable silk as well as signage and inkjet banner products such as adhesive vinyl. All of these fine art inkjet papers are available at much more competitive prices and are, in many cases, superior in performance.

Choosing a Weight of a Fine Art Inkjet Paper

The traditional measurement of fine art paper thickness is given in grams per square meter (gsm). Normal typing paper is around 80 gsm, and typical inkjet fine art papers may range from 120-310 gsm. More expensive fine-art papers are usually on or over 300gsm, while the lesser expensive ones are on or below 210gsm. Heavier fine art papers can cause problems with the paper feed in some printers. Small-format models that have a significantly curved path for the paper through the machine are particularly unlikely to be able to use such heavyweight papers. However, despite what the printer manual says, usually double the maximum weight specified with some printers will print fine art without problems.

Archival Qualities of Inkjet Fine Art Paper

Three factors - paper, ink and paper coating - interact to determine print lifetimes, as well as the environmental factors including storage and display conditions. Good fine art papers are likely to lead to longer lifetimes, and as with most other media, this generally means acid-free materials.

Cheaper fine art paper generally will not last well, breaking down over time to give acidic materials that will attack the image. Acid-free papers usually perform better.

The best fine art papers are generally made from 100% cotton rag rather than wood pulp, and these tend to be expensive - at least a dollar for a sheet.

Inkjet Fine Art Paper Confusing Issues

There are actually relatively few manufacturers of high quality papers. The distributors sell many papers made by some manufacturers under different brand names, which makes for some confusion. Claims by some of these re-branders that they specify different coatings for the paper they sell often - if not always - appear to be untrue. The aim of this re-branding is to lock the user into using paper supplied by them, when the same material (but under a different name) may be available more cheaply elsewhere. Breathing Color does not participate in such a strategy and our customers appreciate the exlcusivity and uniqueness of our product line.

Glossy Inkjet Fine Art Papers

Gloss papers are generally made for non-archival use. They range from highly reflective plastic films to materials with a relatively low gloss, that are almost closer to a pearl or lustre finish.

Pigment printers seldom produce good results on gloss surfaces, often giving very slow drying and patchy results.

Here are a few tips and recommendations for hand embellish a print on inkjet canvas.

As a general rule, oil paint does not react well with inkjet receptive coatings of IRC. If oil paint is required, it is recommended to coat the canvas with a protective varnish very well, in an attempt to avoid penetration from the oil paint. Note, the oil paint may still penetrate micro-pores within the topcoat, which can cause physical deterioration of your print. Therefore, it is best to use watercolor paint when hand-embellishing your inkjet prints on canvas. HOWEVER - Oil paint can be used over our Glamour II Veneer water-based coating. One thing that you have to be sure of is that there are no open holes in the coating where the canvas is exposed and could come in contact with the oil paints. To be safe you may have to coat your print more than once to be sure that the entire surface is covered.

If you wish to achieve the same gloss look with the paint that you get from the gloss coating, mix the watercolor paint with a clear acrylic and that will help to give it a gloss finish. Once you have embellished your print with paint, do not coat it again with Glamour II Veneer.

In regards to vehicle signage, Repositionable Vinyl (which utilizes a non-permanent, strong adhesive) is widely used by our customers and is therefore highly recommended. On the contrary, Adhesive Vinyl is not recommended due to its permanent adhesive which could cause issues with paint damage, etc.

Whenever you are placing any signage outdoors where it is going to be subject to environmental conditions (i.e. humidity, UV rays, etc.) we always recommend using liquid lamination (specifically, our Glamour II Veneer Aqueous coating). Also, sheet lamination is always another option. Collectively, some form of protective lamination should always be used for any long term outdoor signage.

Without any lamination, although these products are semi-archival you would only expect to use them for short-term purposes. The exact time will depend on the environmental factors of your specific climate. But no significant deterioration/fading of color should occur within a 3-6 month period. Both Adhesive Vinyl and Vitality Banner are highly water resistant and weather resistant (Vitality Banner especially) and are without any doubt amongst the top of their class and will therefore perform equally if not better than any other competitive products in the marketplace.

Glamour II Veneer can be used as a mounting adhesive. Make sure that you are mounting the print before coating the top of the print. When you are using Glamour II Veneer as a mounting adhesive, you want to dilute it with 10% distilled water. After diluting it, apply it to the surface that you will be mounting your inkjet canvas or fine art paper print to. Make sure that you are very generous with the coating. After placing the print over the coated surface, run your hands over the print and make sure there are no air pockets underneath the print. Be sure to not apply the Glamour II Veneer directly to the back of the inkjet canvas or fine art paper. Mounting fine art paper can be easier sometimes than mounting inkjet canvas because the back of the fine art paper is more consistent.

Unfortunately as of 8/11/2006 Breathing Color does not offer a double-sided paper. If you are able to use a single-sided paper we would highly recommend any of our Elegance Fine Art Paper line or our Sterling Fine Art Paper line. Check back with us in 2-3 months and a double-sided paper may be available.

Once the print has completely dried, you should have no problem rolling it up. Keep in mind that when the print is exposed to extremely hot or humid temperatures, it may have a tendency to soften and stick to itself. For this reason it is always recommended to protect each print with a sheet of an acid-free barrier paper.

We do not recommend an air pressure setting as not all guns, air compressors, nozzles, etc. are the same. Therefore it is recommended that customers using an HVLP gun to coat with Glamour II Veneer test several different pressure settings and coating techniques to determine the best solution for each unique setup is.

Water is the only cleanup needed for Glamour II Veneer to be removed from the foam roller and other surfaces. If the coating becomes difficult to remove from any surface, including the HVLP reservoir, 409 all purpose cleaner will disintegrate Glamour II Veneer upon contact.

Heat lamps are not suggested for drying Glamour II Veneer. In fact, cold air is the best way to dry Glamour II Veneer but be careful if you are considering a fan not to blow dust or debris onto a wet print.

Because Glamour II Veneer is a water-based coating, you must be more careful when applying it to canvas that has been printed with dye-based ink than with pigment-based inks. Therefore prints should only be coated once they have had a chance to completely dry for 24 hours. When coating, use very little pressure with the roller as to not disturb the dye ink. If you allow ample drying time and do not apply pressure to the roller when coating, Glamour II should work very well without any problems.

Glamour II Veneer, like all varnishes and veneers, need to be dried before stretching or mounting. Glamour II Veneer is a water-based coating therefore drying time can vary drastically depending on where it is being used. In very dry climate, Glamour II Veneer can dry within thirty minutes. In very wet climate, Glamour II may not dry for two hours. The average drying time, however, is approximately 45 minutes to 1 hour.

The drying time for this product can also vary based upon your chosen dilution ratio. The more you dilute, the faster it will dry. If you don't dilute at all, Glamour II could take several days to dry. A minimum 20% dilution is normally required, although some of our customers have discovered their own method of applying without dilution.

We do have many customers using the Canon i9900 and the Epson R1800 and having success with 13" x 19" sheets of Brilliance Chromata White Canvas. Both printers work well but both printers have a hard time feeding inkjet canvas. If you are planning on printing a lot of canvas, we recommend the Epson 4800. Although the 4800 is significantly more expensive, it will not give you any problems with printing while the R1800 and i9900 might.

Matte Black (MK) ink is designed for Matte Papers and Photo Black (PK) ink is designed for glossy papers. The difference between these two black ink types is simple; MK prints a very dull, flat black, while PK prints a highly glossy, shiny black. Think in terms of flat black spray paint vs. glossy black spray paint. Generally speaking, the very best results and the deepest blacks for that particular substrate will be achieved by using PK with glossy substrates and MK with matte substrates. Your Epson printer manual will also provide you with a decent explanation of when they recommend using matte black ink or photo black ink.

That being said, wide-format Epson printers present a problem for those who wish to maximize their output potential by offering both matte and glossy papers as available substrate options. This is because Epson machines are built to run either the PK or the MK, rather than allowing the printmaker to switch blacks from print to print. As a result of this quandary, those who own wide-format Epson printers must make an important decision What type of prints do I want to be best at?" In other words, if 80% of your printmaking business is fine art on matte papers and matte canvases, naturally you will want to run your Epson with MK, which will render the highest black density on your primary substrate line. Likewise, if you are a photo lab for example and mostly reproduce photography on glossy papers, the PK is the more intelligent choice as it will render the glossiest black, which is most desirable on glossy substrates (to avoid a gloss differential).

Traditionally, most all inkjet printable substrates, matte or glossy, will "work" with the PK ink. Though the maximum black density (Dmax) would be significantly less, the print is otherwise unaffected. This is not true of the MK ink. When most glossy or semi-glossy papers are introduced to the MK ink, the ink will run and bleed, rendering the print completely unusable. Breathing Color is one of the only manufacturers to offer glossy inkjet papers and semi-gloss inkjet papers that work well with both inks. Our Vibrance Gloss, Vibrance Semi-Gloss, and Allure Rag, are all papers with a glossy surface that will print surprisingly well with the MK ink. The prints will dry instantly and will not bleed or run in the slightest and the gloss differential barely noticeable if at all. Therefore, we have created a solution for printmakers who predominantly use matte papers and canvases with MK ink, but still want the option of printing on glossy substrates. Sure, these papers will look best" with the PK ink but most would be pleasantly surprised by the print quality using the MK ink.

We currently do not offer Trial Rolls in a 13" size, however, we do offer 13" x 40" rolls of many products that are already heavily discounted by 26.7%, and can be purchased with this discount in any quantity. There is not much more discounting we can do than this - 13" rolls are already priced as clear industry leaders by a significant margin. The same goes for all 17" rolls that we sell of every product in our line. We permanently discount these sizes in order to encourage trial with minimal investment, and to encourage ongoing use. There is no better deal on the planet and we hope to create long-term, loyal customers by doing so.

If you cannot or prefer to not use a 13" roll, you may also try our boxes of sheets in 8.5" x 11" or 13" x19."

The reason that the Brilliance Natural Inkjet Canvas is not available is because we are discontinuing this line of inkjet canvas. The reason that it is still on our website is because we still have some available. We want to make sure that people know that we only have a limited supply so that they know not to expect this inkjet canvas to be around much longer. The reason that it has been discontinued is because we have improved our inkjet canvas and come out with Chromata White Fine Art Inkjet Canvas. This fine art inkjet canvas is a poly cotton blend canvas that is much more consistent than the Brilliance Natural Inkjet Canvas. If you would still like to order the Brilliance Natural Inkjet Canvas feel free to call in and place an order. We only have a limited supply and not all sizes are available.

If you do not see an available icc profile on our icc profiles page for the particular printer and paper you are using, need not worry. All you need to do is print out icc profile "targets" for the papers or inkjet canvas your require profiles for on you printer and send it in to us and we can create a custom icc profile for you, currently at no charge. We typically will make this icc profile and email it to you within approximately 48 hours of receiving your printed targets, but this time may vary slightly. The icc profiles page has the downloadable targets and instructions on how and where to send them. It also has an instructional video which shows the correct way to print them out if you are unsure of how to do this.

We do accept checks. However, your order will not be sent out until we have received your check and it has cleared. This will add a delay to your shipments and this is why we recommend paying with a credit card. It gives us the ability to receive payment on your order on the same that we receive your order. This allows us to ship it on that same day.

As long as you are using a water-resistant inkjet canvas or fine art paper with pigment inks you should have no problems with using Glamour II Veneer liquid lamination. Glamour II Veneer is a water based liquid lamination coating that is practically odorless and is easily applied with a foam roller. We also have instructional videos on our website which guide you through the liquid lamination (coating) process.

As of 08/10/2006 Allure Rag Fine Art Paper is not available in sheets. We exepct it to be available in sheets by October of 2006. Usually, we first launch our products in rolls, make sure we address any potential quality control issues with the product, and then introduce the product as sheets.

If you have a small format printer and want to try this product at this point in time, we recommend purchasing a roll and cutting it down into sheets. This is easy to do and can be very cost effective since the costs per square foot of rolls are much cheaper than sheets.

Right now the reason that there is no buy button for the Brilliance Titanium White Canvas is because it has not truly been released yet. It is still in the "beta testing" period right now. We will be releasing soon so once you see the buy buttons activated you can purchase it. On that same page, You can also get on our notification list so that when the product gets back in stock you will be automatically notified.

If you have forgotten your password and have requested to have your password sent to you by email and still cannnot find it, make sure to check your junk mail. Sometimes your account will mistake the email as junk mail and that is why it is difficult to find.
Breathing Color Support
http://www.breathingcolor.com/support

If you are not receiving any emails from Breathing Color regarding your password being reset it might be possible that your email program or ISP provider has an automated spam filter activated. To remove Breathing Color's email address from these types of programs here's a list of the most common email services and instructions on how to disable this feature:

Many Internet Service Providers (ISP) such as AOL, Yahoo and MSN Hotmail have SPAM filters to give you greater control over what e-mails reach your inbox to help you avoid unwanted junk e-mail. Unfortunately, these filters can block e-mails you wish to receive from Breathing Color unless you add store@breathingcolor.com to your e-mail address book and/or update your e-mail program's white list or filters.
Below are instructions for the most common ISP or e-mail programs. (Different versions may have slight variations to the steps.)

AOL Subscribers:
1. From your mailbox screen click on the drop down arrow to the right of the 'Mail Options' and then click on 'Address Book'.
2. Click the 'Add' button ('Add Contact' for version 8.0).
3. Type in or cut and paste store@breathingcolor.com into the 'Screen Name' block and then click 'Save'.

Juno/Netzero Subscribers:
1. From your mailbox screen click on the 'Address Book' tab.
2. Next to the 'Lists' tab click the 'Add new contact' link.
3. Type in or cut and paste store@breathingcolor.com into the 'E-mail Address' block, and then click the 'Save' button.

Earthlink Webmail Subscribers:
1. From your mailbox screen click on the 'Address Book'.
2. Click the 'Add' button.
3. Type in or cut and paste store@breathingcolor.com into the 'E-mail' block and then click the 'Save' button.

Hotmail Subscribers:
1. Select the 'Options' links in the upper right of the screen.
2. Click on 'Contacts' link on the left part of the screen.
3. Click on 'Safe List'.
4. Type in or cut and paste store@breathingcolor.com into the box and then click 'Add'.

Yahoo Subscribers:
1. From your mailbox screen click on the drop down arrow to the right of the 'Addresses' and then click on 'Add Contact'.
2. Type in or cut and paste store@breathingcolor.com into the 'E-mail' box and then click 'Save'.

G-mail Subscribers:
1. From your mailbox, select 'Filters tab.
2. Select 'Create a Filter'.
3. Type in or cut and paste store@breathingcolor.com in the 'From' field.
4. Set 'Choose Action' to be 'Star it'.

Microsoft Outlook (most versions):
1. From your 'Inbox', select 'File'  'New' and then 'Contact'.
2. Create a contact in your address book for store@breathingcolor.com (Copy email address into the 'E-mail' field and click 'Save and Close' button.).
3. From your Inbox select 'Tools' then select 'Organize'.
4. In 'Ways to Organize Inbox', select 'Using Folders'.
5. Create a rule to move new messages store@breathingcolor.com to 'Inbox' and then click the 'Create' button.
6. Click the 'X' in the upper right section when done to close the dialogue box and return to Outlook.

At this time we do not have the profile for the Epson 9800 PK for Allure. If you were to print out a target and send it into us, we will gladly make you your own personal profile for no charge. As soon as we recieve this target we will make the profile within 48 hours and send you an email with the profile attached.

Before referring to our knowledgebase for icc profile information, you will want to visit our icc profiles section of our web site. Here you can download icc profiles for all the various printer types, and also see the exact settings required for each of them.

Usually, the media type that we build our profiles with for the PK inks is Premium Photo Glossy Paper, and for the MK inks it's Water Color Radiant White. NONETHELESS - You should always refer to the icc profiles section of our web site because this is not always the case.

Breathing Color manufacturers award winning fine art papers and canvas. We are not a fine art publisher. Instead, we sell to publishers who do fine art printmaking, and we also sell our products to printmakers who print on behalf of publishers.

If you are interested in submitting your images so that they can be used in our marketing samples, we are always interested in seeing new art that might be able to represent our inkjet media well. You can submit your images to info@breathingcolor.com .
Intelligence Representative
The BC Digital Intelligence Library
Breathing Color Support
http://www.breathingcolor.com/support

It is definitely possible to use our Brilliance Chromata White Canvas with your Mimaki. However, the main question is what temperature you are transferring your ink at. Brilliance Chromata White is a cotton/poly blend, so you might want to check the temperature that you will be transferring at and minimize the heat if possible. 

The heat on some dye sublimations may warp the polyester raw material. Brilliance Chromata White Canvas like other Breathing Color Inkjet Media are designed specifically for pigment based inkjet printers, but we have had numerous customers use our media on other types of printers including a series of Mimakis. But to suggest the normal type of canvas used when printing with dye sublimation, you should use a 100% cotton canvas. 

Nonetheless, the best option is always to test the canvas for yourself. We make this very easy and inexpensive to do through our heavily discounted "trial rolls" which can be quickly purchased right on our website, by clicking here http://www.breathingcolor.com/bc/catalog/index.php?cPath=303. A 17"x20' trial roll of this canvas is only $23.99 and its precisely how all of our customers evaluate this canvas.

As of July 12th, 2006, we do not have a HP 130 in house nor have we tested it ourselves, but we do plan to have one in the near future. However, we do have many customers that have this printer and who have been very successful in using our inkjet canvas, fine art paper and signage.

All of the fine art paper and inkjet canvas made by Breathing Color is specifically designed for Epson's Ultrachrome and K3 Inks. Every Epson printer size is also supported with compatible product sizes such as 13", 17", 24", 36" and 44" width rolls. In addition, each product has a custom profile for all Epson printers to ensure color accuracy and ease of use.

In addition to industry-leading inkjet canvas and inkjet papers, Breathing Color also manufactures high-end graphics and signage material known as the Picturesque Collection. Among this collection is our Repositionable Adhesive Vinyl which is well suited for stickers, posters, and decals, due to its easily removable adhesive backing and its outdoor durability. 17" x20" Trial Rolls of Repositionable Adhesive Vinyl are available for testing. http://www.breathingcolor.com/bc/catalog/index.php?cPath=502

Another very popular alternative to inkjet canvas and fine art paper is our Pure Silk. Exactly like it sounds, this product is 100% Pure Silk, which can be printed directly onto using a pigment-based inkjet printer. It comes on a roll with a rigid removable backing. Our Pure Silk is water-resistant and should be handled just like any other silk. In other words, do not machine wash it, but dry cleaning is acceptable.

Breathing Color has just opened its new division in Australia, where you can purchase inkjet products directly at competitive prices including the 17" Brilliance Chromata White Canvas. This move marks the first time that Australian printmakers will be able to buy directly from an industry leading manufacturer of a worldwide brand.

I apologize that it was so disappointing to buy media from our older Australian distributor, but all that will change. We are no longer in partnership with that distributor. The main reason that the Company ended its relationship with them was because less than 5% of the product line was being represented by the local distributor, and the 5% actually represented did not consist of any best-selling products in the Breathing Color line. As a result, Australian printmakers like yourself, were not offered the vast majority of products that define Breathing Color as a leading manufacturer in North America and Europe. Perhaps the most understated best-seller was the exact product you are looking for, Brilliance Chromata White Canvas. Although Brilliance I Natural is still an industry leading canvas, Brilliance Chromata White is better due to the improved OBA-free inkjet receptive coating(IRC). You are probably already familiar with the aspects of this canvas, but if you'd like to read a little more about it, click on this link: http://www.breathingcolor.com/bc/catalog/includes/sts_templates/Articles_0905.html

The Company has since shipped over $1 Million in inventory by air and sea and is now shipping many of its products from Adelaide, South Australia. By May 15th 2006, Breathing Color will have over $1 million of inventory ready to ship to the professional printmaking market, so your products are readily available at any time.

Thank you for making Breathing Color as your source for printing information. I have complied a list of printmakers on different regions of Colorado including the greater Denver area. All of these printmakers are very specialized in the giclee and fine art printing profession. They also use some of not all Breathing Color Media. Please mention that Tom Lee from Breathing Color recommended these printmakers to you.

Photo FX Vail
Barbara & Tom Bingham
http://www.photofxvail.com/
970-926-7650

Digital Impact Communications
Ishmael Hallin
http://www.big-format.com/
303-573-9600

Reed Photo
Bob Jewett
http://www.reedphoto.com/
800-999-8084

Peck Photographics
Scott Peck
scottpeck@earthlink.net
303-893-1901

Infinite Editions
Ron Landucci
ron@infinite-editions.com
303-271-9400


Intelligence Representative
BC Digital Intelligence Library
Breathing Color, Inc.

HP Designjet 130 printers are a little different to profile than other Epson Stylus printers. HP's printer drivers have set options that you must choose from in order to get the best results. You may already have found that HP's printer driver does not offer "Canvas" as one of those options. We found that using "Heavy Coated Paper" gives you the best print quality on both our Brilliance Chromata White Canvas and our Elegance Fine Art Papers.

Please understand that your results will vary depending on what type of imaging program you are printing with alongside the HP printer driver. If you are using a standard program such as Adobe Photoshop, we would like to recommend submitting a target to us so we can make you a custom profile.

Note, when printing these targets with Photoshop CS/CS2, make sure you select "No Color Management" in Photoshop's "Print with Preview" window. When printing with earlier versions of Photoshop, make sure you select "Same as Source" as your profile in Photoshop's "Print with Preview" window. Then click "Print" to go into your HP printer driver. Here is where you need to select "Heavy Coated Paper" as your media setting. Click on this link to find the two targets that you will need to print and send to us. It is located at the bottom of the web page labeled "1 of 2" and "2 of 2". You will also find a video documenting how to print targets. Although the video was designed for Epson Stylus users, you will find it to be very similar to the HP printer drivers.
http://www.breathingcolor.com/bc/catalog/index.php?cPath=1001

Send the printed targets on each substrate to the address below, and we will email you back a profile within 24 hours.

Thank you for your purchase and interest in Breathing Color. We do not have any representation in the Vancouver area nor do we have any distributors in Canada. Breathing Color USA is well equipped to serve all of North America. We used to have a distributor in Canada, however having a distributor leads to a mark up in prices. So we took the opportunity to eliminate that mark up by selling direct to Canada. Canadian customers can now buy direct with Breathing Color and take advantage of our manufacturing prices.

We are also well suited to find you the best shipping rate possible. Although shipping across the border may seem complicated, it is actually very cost effective and saves our customers overall due to our preferred status with UPS . UPS International Standard is usually the fastest and most efficient way to ship to Canada. We have found that shipping with UPS to Canada is actually no different than shipping across the USA . It may take a day longer and cost a couple of dollars more , however, you are now buying at manufacturing prices which more than compensates for the small increase in shipping costs. The fact that you can take advantage of our quality products at the total cost you will now, with shipping included, is a serious advantage that no other manufacturer (such as Hahnemuhle, for example) provides.

If you do have a preferred shipping method, please specify in the "comments" box when confirming your orders.

We promise that this process will not be complicated, and by working with our customers we intend to improve it over time and make it more advantageous.

Please also take advantage of working with our media specialists on a personal level. You can simply do so by calling us. As a manufacturer, we can provide information and support that no other company can duplicate.

I spoke to my chemist. It is definitely possible to use our Brilliance Chromata White Canvas with your Mimaki. However, the main question is what temperature you are transferring your ink at. Brilliance Chromata White is a cotton/poly blend, so you might want to check the temperature that you will be transferring at and minimize the heat if possible. The heat on some dye sublimations may warp the polyester raw material. Brilliance Chromata White Canvas like other Breathing Color Inkjet Media are designed specifically for pigment based inkjet printers, but we have had numerous customers use our media on other types of printers including a series of Mimakis. But to suggest the normal type of canvas used when printing with dye sublimation, you should use a 100% cotton canvas.

Nonetheless, the best option is always to test the canvas for yourself. We make this very easy and inexpensive to do through our heavily discounted "trial rolls" which can be quickly purchased right on our website, by clicking here http://www.breathingcolor.com/bc/catalog/index.php?cPath=303. A 17"x20' trial roll of this canvas is only $23.99 and its precisely how all of our customers evaluate this canvas.

Thank you for the nice compliment. Our Brilliance Chromata White Canvas is compatible with your HP130 printer.

We also have tested your inks , on our canvas, coated with our Glamour II Veneer. I have contacted many customers who are using the Vivera inks with our coating and canvas and their results vary. Some customers have been able to coat only after a couple hours of drying time but most had to wait over 24 hours. Using an HVLP system might be better. You can eliminate the risk of rolling or brushing the ink off your print. When using a HVLP system, make sure that you dilute Glamour II by at least 50% with water, and a second coat might be necessary. If you decide on using Glamour II then we highly recommend going with the HVLP system.

The light-fastness of Brilliance Chromata White Canvas is arguably the best option available mainly because this canvas is manufactured free of optical brightener agents (OBA's) that deteriorate over time and cause canvas/papers to yellow. However, we do not have particular longevity testing with the Vivera inks. I can only state what HP claims for their best light-fastness. Due to the OBA free inkjet receptive coating (IRC) used in Brilliance Chromata White Canvas, we can only account for 30-40 years. By coating your prints with Glamour II, you should be able to increase that by a slight percentage. With certainty we can argue that Brilliance Chromata White Canvas will give you better light-fastness over every other canvas on the market that is manufactured with Optical Brighteners. More information about the harmful effects of Optical Brighteners can be found at the Wilhelm Research Institute by clicking here http://www.wilhelm-research.com/ep9600%20print%20permanence.html

To create the most consistent finish on your print, make sure you follow a few pointers:

1) Make sure you have about 30% water. (40% is a good dilution as well, but your gloss will slowly lessen with more water, and you can always coat twice.) A good way to prevent an inconsistent mixture of water and coating is to use hot water. Hot water will will make sure that the water is completely mixed into the coating.
2) Make sure you roll gently. The less pressure you apply on the roller, the less varnish squeezes out from the side of the rollers that create streaks.
3) Make sure you have a thick enough coating. To ensure that you have enough coating, I recommend pouring the Glamour II directly onto your print. You can pour 3-4 thin lines across your print. This also eliminates the process of having to re-dip your roller back into the tray.
4) Make sure you allow your print to sit even if you see light streaks or differences in thickness in coating. If the coat is thick enough, Glamour II will self-level.
Intelligence Representative.

The easiest way to save money is to purchase 3 or 10 items at any given time. If you do so, the appropriate discounts are as follows: 

3 item discount: Buy any 3 or more "hot" items in an order and receive 17% discount on all of those items. 
10 item discount: Buy any 10 or more "hot" items in an order and receive a 26.7% discount on all those items. 

What is a "Hot" Item? 

"Hot" items can be purchased separately and/or grouped together with other "Hot" items to obtain a discount. There are no discounts for other items - only "Hot" items. 95% of our items are "Hot" items. "Hot" items are easily recognizable because they show discounted prices (as follows): 

(3) = Discounted Price of that item if you meet 3 item discount. 
(10) = Discounted Price of that item if you meet 10 item discount. 

Just click "Buy", then update your quantities as needed. All You need are 3+ or 10+ "Hot" items in your cart and the appropriate discount will be provided to all items in the final step of your shopping process -- the "confirm order" page. Here you will see your entire order, with your discount, before your credit card is charged. 

Here are a few examples of orders that qualify for the 3-item (17%) discount: 

Order 1 (qualifies for 3-item discount) 
2 box of 13"x19" Elegance Velvet 
1 box of 8.5"x11" Brilliance Natural 

Order 2 (qualifies for 3-item discount) 
1 roll of Elegance 24"x40'
1 roll of Chromata White 24"x40'
1 gallon of Glamour II Veneer Coating, Gloss 

Order 3 (qualifies for 3-item discount) 
1 roll of Elegance 44"x40'
1 roll of Chromata White 44"x40'
1 roll of Adhesive Vinyl 24"x40' 

The next level of discounting is our 10-item (26.7%) discount. Here are a few examples of orders that qualify: 

Order 1 (qualifies for 10-item discount) 
5 rolls of Chromata White 24"x40'
5 gallons of Glamour II Veneer Coating, Gloss 

Order 2 (qualifies for 10-item discount) 
3 rolls of Chromata White 44"
3 rolls of Elegance Textured 24" 
4 rolls of Economy Banner 

Payment Problems? 

If your credit card is not being accepted by our store, we recommend that you try using this credit card with the Paypal option, located on the same checkout page. Paypal enables any individual or business with an email address to securely, easily and quickly send and receive payments online. 

PayPal's service builds on the existing financial infrastructure of bank accounts and credit cards and utilizes the world's most advanced proprietary fraud prevention systems to create a safe, global, real-time payment solution.If your card is not accepted through Paypal than you will need to contact your credit card provider. You may have fraud protection that is blocking your card from being used with us.

For testing and evaluation, we offer short trial rolls of all of our products that are sold at cost. Typically, trial rolls are 17"x20". The purpose for this is to allow our customers to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of our products, cost effectively. There are several steps that should be taken when testing any new digital substrate for your printing business.

1. The substrate should be tested with several different images to be sure the product performs well with everything image-type that you intend to use it for (try a portrait photograph, a vibrant fine art print, a black & white piece, etc.). Make sure you are selecting images that are fairly different from one another with respect to color and tonal gradation for a thorough evaluation.

2. Show a few of your most important customers a print of their own work on the media you are testing. Maybe provide an example of your current media to illustrate a comparison. Explain the physical and archival attributes of the new substrate and the reasons that you are considering a switch. It is the printmaker's job to educate their artists about all things printing-related, especially media.

3. Trial rolls provide enough media to create custom profiles, for those who are capable. Breathing Color also offers a free custom profile service, which requires approximately two square feet of printed media.

4. It is important to have enough media to leave a margin for error in case the first attempt had not been printed correctly (print settings, profile, platen gap, etc.).

5. For canvas: coating, stretching, and hand embellishment should also be tested.

Sterling Rag 210g is ideally suited for fine art and photographic reproduction, high quality poster production, and portraiture. Sterling Fine Art Papers is a smooth fine art paper that was specifically made to achieve the widest color gamut and highest Dmax values (highest quality available today). However, this may be compromised by the inks and printers used. Although the DuraBrite, Photographic Dye, Archival, Vivera, HP Dye, ChromaLife, and Canon Dye are all compatible with the whole Sterling line, we recommend using pigmented inks like the Epson's Ultrachrome and K3, Roland Pigments, Canon's ChromaPLUS and Lucia, and HP's UV Pigmented inks. Those inks will give you the best longevity with the combination of this these papers.

Sterling Rag 210g is available in rolls that range from 17" rolls to 54" rolls. Each roll has 66 feet in length. Sterling Rag is also available in 8.5" x 11" and 13" x 19" sheets. Sterling Rag Platinum sheets will follow shortly after rolls are released.

Breathing Color's E-Store is the easiest and fastest way to order Breathing Color Media. When purchasing through our E-Store, you will also save the most amount of money. We periodically have promotions on top of our everyday low pricing combinations, such as our Trial Kits, 3 and 10 Hot Items pricing, and Power Buyers pricing. However if you ever have any problems purchasing online, it may be due to a few different factors:

(1) Your password is not being recognized. In certain instances, passwords may be forgotten, reset, or simply mistaken for another. In this case, simply click on "Password forgotten" in the customer login page. Enter your e-mail address and click continue. In less than 5-10 minutes, your new password will be sent to your e-mail address. NOTE: If you do not remember the e-mail address that you signed up with, you may have to sign in as a new customer.
(2) Your credit card is not processing. We currently only accept a few major credit cards. We accept any credit card or debit card that has the official Visa, Mastercard, or American Express logo shown on the card. If you do not wish to use your credit card or do not have an accepted credit card, please consider using our PayPal purchasing and charging system.
(3) There are no "BUY" buttons visible. Whenever you do not see a "BUY"
button next to a specific product, that product is either out of stock or has not been released. Breathing Color is constantly introducing new, innovative products to our line, which are immediately added to our website. On occasion, we will only release a couple sizes of a specific product during the first production run. This is normal for all new releases. Typically, other sizes will follow shortly, and when products and sizes are newly released or restocked, the "BUY" buttons will once again become active. This is a good way to keep track of product availability as our website is updated daily.

You list profiles for both matte and photo black Epson 9800 for Chromata White Canvas - which ink type provides the best results?

Is there a Canadian distributor?

Breathing Color Media can be used with either matte black (MK) or photo black (PK) inks exceptionally well. However, as a general rule, matte papers look best with MK ink and glossy papers look best with PK ink. When considering whether to load your printer with matte or photo black, you must consider the primary source of your business. If you run a photo lab for example and predominantly print on glossy surfaces, it is in your best interest to use the photo black. You will still have the ability to print on matte papers, but your best prints will be with the substrate you print with most often, glossy papers. Likewise, if your are in the business of fine art reproduction and predominantly print on matte fine art papers and canvas, the matte black ink will render a significantly higher Dmax (maximum black density) than that of the photo black. As a printmaker of any kind, achieving the highest Dmax possible is of great importance as black density is a major distinguishing factor between a good print and a great one. It is common for high-end printmakers to utilize both matte and photo black inks in separate printers. This is the best way to ensure that the proper ink is being applied to the proper substrate. A recent alternative to owning two separate printers can be found through RIP software programs such as Image Print by Colorbyte Software, where they offer the option of using both PK and MK in the newest Epson K3 printers.

In addition, most all glossy papers are not printable with the matte black inks. Because MK was not designed to print on glossy surfaces, the ink will run and smear easily if attempted. For this reason many fine art printmakers have been forced to use the PK ink to avoid losing established glossy paper business. The Breathing Color Vibrance Gloss and Vibrance Semi-Gloss were created for this purpose as they dry instantly and look amazing when printed with the MK ink. These two products have been designed to allow fine art printmakers to use the MK inks to produce the highest quality watercolor and canvas prints, without losing their photography customers.

When printing in a high-output environment, often times printmakers are not physically "babysitting" their printer as it works through a roll. In this situation, a printmaker will find it helpful for the canvas/paper to detach itself from the roll once it has reached the end. This way the printer knows that the roll is finished and stops printing. However, depending upon how the media was converted, some inkjet substrates may have a tendency to do just the opposite and stay attached to the core once the end of the roll has been reached. If you are experiencing this problem with a particular media, a short term solution is to simply calculate the length of the roll and set the print job to not exceed that predetermined length. A good rule of thumb us to stop three feet short of the known end of the roll. A long term solution is to inform the media manufacturer so they can take the proper steps to modify the attachment adhesive on their next conversion of the product. Simply using a less aggressive adhesive in the converting process will solve the problem. At Breathing Color, we are aware of this situation and have taken the necessary steps ensure that all of our products are as user-friendly as possible. If you are experiencing detachment issues with any Breathing Color product, kindly let us know, so we can investigate and make the proper adjustments.

We do not recommend storing Glamour II Veneer after it has been diluted. Only dilute as much as you will need when you are coating. Storing Glamour II Veneer after diluting can cause it to separate and harden.

Breathing Color recently announced the opening of its new division in Australia, where Australian printmakers can purchase our exclusive line of over 20 award-winning digital inkjet products directly at fiercely competitive prices. This move marks the first time that Australian printmakers will be able to buy directly from an industry leading manufacturer of a worldwide brand.

The main reason that the Company ended its relationship with a local distributor was because less than 5% of the product line was being represented by the local distributor, and the 5% actually represented did not consist of any best-selling products in the Breathing Color line. As a result, Australian printmakers were not offerred the vast majority of products that define Breathing Color as a leading manufacturer in North America and Europe. Perhaps the most understated best-sellers were the breakthrough Brilliance "Chromata White" Canvas and Glamour II Veneer Giclee Coating. Instead, against the will and knowledge of Breathing Color, inferior lower-cost substitutes were being sold alongside the Brand to Australian customers. The final straw occurred when one of these low-quality canvas substitutes, marketed as a high-quality substitute in Australia but known to be one of the lowest quality canvas products geared for the USA decor market, began yellowing 8 months after being printed and also coated. The Canvas sufferred from "oxidation", and the oxidation was not prevented by the varnish coating manufactured by a Canadian company. Contrary to limited belief in Australia, it is common knowledge in the fine art world that fine art coatings need to always prevent oxidation and all of the five major USA fine art coatings do just this. This predictable industry backlash along with severe underrepresentation and association-risk justified Breathing Color's decision to end this relationship and provide a direct, guaranteed solution to end users.

The Company has since shipped over $1 Million in inventory by air and sea and is now shipping many of its products from Adelaide, South Australia. By May 15th 2006, Breathing Color will have over $1 million of inventory ready to ship to the professional printmaking market.

Nonetheless, since this relationship has ended at the end of March 2006, our former distributor has resorted to using very shameful tactics that are malicious, devious, and confusing to our new Australian customers. These tactics will be addressed in this article, and updates will be posted on a regular basis in order to provide our Australian customers with real, credible information regarding this issue.

On April 3rd 2006, only days after our distribution relationship ended, My Web Name (www.mywebname.com.au/whois) confirmed that our former distributor purchased the domain name " breathingcolor.com.au " so that they could trick customers into visiting their web site and to buy things from them online, while the customers all along intended to visit Breathing Color and have no idea that the web site they are viewing is not affiliated in any way with Breathing Color. Despite the obvious, this action performed by our former distributor is completely against the Published Policy set forth by AUDA, the .au Domain Administration. This is because Breathing Color has been trading in Australia and in other countries for quite some time using this brand name. Furthermore, Breathing Color has applied for an Australian Registered Trademark is respect of the mark "Breathing Color".

To further this cause, our former distributor has even resorted to placing the Breathing Color official logo as the very first logo viewable on their home page (still there on April 24th 2006), even though his relationship with The Company ended (now one month ago). The placement of this logo and the purchase of the domain name by our former distributor is all evidence that their strategy is to continually misrepresent customers and leverage off Breathing Color's reputable brand name, even after a relationship with us no longer exists. Therefore, if you are a customer of ours in Australia, please be aware that these misrepresentations are being made.

Further supporting evidence can be seen be viewing our former distributor's "affiliate companies" page, where Breathing Color is listed however the link has been changed to the "breathingcolor.com.au" domain (the domain purchased by our former distributor). This shows that our former distributor knowingly edited this link after our relationship dissolved, so that they could deceive customers into thinking that the link will lead them where it says it will - to Breathing Color's USA website - but instead, it leads customers to our former distributor's own web store. This is another intended misrepresentation that our Australian customers need to be aware of. As of April 24th 2006, one month after the mutually agreed dissolution of the distribution relationship, the evidence set forth in this article is still viewable. Breathing Color has also collected records of every instance.

The "who is" information which provides all of the registration details of this domain name are as follows:

Domain Name: breathingcolor.com.au
Last Modified: 03-Apr-2006 12:05:13
UTC Registrar ID: R00015-
AR Registrar Name: NetRegistry
Status: OK
Registrant: Bruce Connelly
Registrant ID:
Registrant ROID: C3954084-AR
Registrant Contact Name: Anne-Marie Connelly
Registrant Email: info@gicleemedia.com.au
Tech ID: C0573762-AR
Tech Name: Dominic Main Tech
Email: dmain@netregistry.com.au
Name Server: ns.au.com
Name Server: ns2.au.com

The troubling part is how the evidence brought forth in this article shows that a well thought out strategy to misrepresent Breathing Color customers was actually masterminded by someone on purpose. Buying domain names after a relationship dissolves, editing web sites to misrepresent Brand Names, and other predatory methods all cost money to do. There is an obvious committment to this strategy. All evidence shows that the intention to misrepresent is on an ongoing, seemingly unavoidable theme with our former distributor that our Australian customers need to be aware of when trying to find us through the web, or when trying to buy from us through the web.

At this point, after exhausting all diplomatic efforts, Breathing Color has obtained legal representation and is currently using legal means to obtain the domain name back from our former distributor and to stop them from misrepresenting our Brand Name on their home page, affiliate page, and any other page on their web site.

Breathing Color Announces Direct Distribution in Australia of its Award-Winning Line of Digital Inkjet Media and Supplies 

Orange, California, United States (BUSINESS WIRE) APRIL 06, 2005 

Breathing Color, Inc. is proud to announce that it will begin selling directly to Australian users of digital inkjet media and related supplies for fine art, photographic and specialty signage products. This move allows the rapidly growing Australian user base to purchase Breathing Color's complete line of products, which had been previously underrepresented in Australia. As one of the most innovative and dynamic specialty media suppliers in the world, Breathing Color believes that it is uniquely positioned to meet the needs of the Australian market. 

Nick Friend, Breathing Color's President indicated that, "we believe that the Australian market is one of the most important and fast paced markets in the world." Breathing Color's sole focus is serving the needs of the digital fine art (giclee) and photographic markets and are therefore one of very few suppliers that can address their complete needs. Mr. Friend explained further that while there are numerous suppliers, none have the focus and breadth of products necessary to meet the complete needs of the digital fine art and photographic users. 

He believes that quality, performance and price of the Breathing Color media and supplies is market leading. Breathing Color's product line includes fine art papers, photo papers, canvases, specialty signage products and protective top coatings and varnishes. All of the products are designed to maximize color gamut, image density and archivability and are supported by ICC color profiles and information on their use. Breathing Color has chosen to partner with several service providers in Australia that will provide local shipping, warehousing and support to Australian users. By working through these partners all customers should receive the seamless service that all of Breathing Colors customers have come to expect. 

We do our absolute best to package our customer orders with good quality boxes and packing materials strictly because it is a necessary step in delivering a "love at first sight experience" to our customers. Unfortunately, when your order leaves our shipping facilities it is out of our hands and in the hands of freight carriers who can negatively impact our protocol, despite our best efforts. Occasionally, our customers receive packages from UPS that have been egregiously damaged in some way. Damages include:

- Boxes being ripped open in some areas leaving exposed product or damaged product
- Boxes being wet from being left in the rain or subject to an accident
- Boxes being severely dented or distressed, causing damage to your products

When UPS does this, you are entitled to recourse. The recourse amount will be the insured amount, and rest assured Breathing Color insures every single order for the full amount. Based upon our experiences, here are the procedures you need to follow in order to be eligible for recourse:

(1) If you have not opened anything yet, take some digital pictures of the damaged shipment
(2) Save every damaged box because UPS will require to see it for themselves
(3) Contact UPS and submit your complaint immediately

Art Peel

If you are using a RIP from Colorbyte, Onyx, Wasatch, Ergosoft, or any other, you will need to contact them and they will be able to make you profiles for our papers. Please contact one of our media specialists who you can speak to you about receiving a credit for a specific amount of material that you can send to your RIP manufacturer. Typically, no more than 5 sheets of 11"x17", or the equivalent amount of square feet on a roll, are required. Your RIP manufacturer should be able to get this done within a few weeks.

Often we get support issues from our customers telling us that Elegance Velvet is flaking terribly when they print, causing voids to become apparent when the flakes fall off. We also are occasionally told that Elegance Velvet has a large amount of debris on the surface. 

Neither of these are true of Elegance Velvet. This fine art paper is made with an inkjet receptive coating that does not flake, and is also very resistant to scuffing. 

If you believe your Elegance Velvet roll is flaking, here are a few things to check on: 

(1) Are you working in a particularly dusty environment? If your printers are in a dusty or dirty environment, this is definitely going to affect your prints. Dust and debris can get into the inside of your printer, they can also affect your heads which could cause voids in printed image. Furthermore, if your fine art paper roll is exposed (not in its plastic) for short periods of time, the dust and debris will land on the roll. This brings us to the next issue -

(2) How long was your Elegance Velvet fine art paper roll left "exposed" (meaning, without plastic covering and also not in its original box)? Leaving your roll of fine art paper (or canvas) exposed for even short periods of time is dangerous because all sorts of debris will definitely attach itself to the roll. This doesn't even matter if you think your environment is very clean. The particles that will affect your roll are extremely small, they travel without the help of any wind (when people walk on carpet, or even when people breathe -- you can imagine what a ceiling fan or a standing floor fan will do), and they are everywhere. If you have left your roll of fine art paper exposed for a few hours, depending upon your environment and where you actually placed the roll, your roll is probably affected with debris. The right practice is to only open the roll when you plan on printing it. When it is not printing, you should put the roll back into its plastic cover and then into its original box. Note: Don't ever put the roll back into its original box without the plastic. Also, don't ever substitute the plastic cover for anything else - such as Kraft Paper. Both Cardboard boxes and Kraft Paper are acidic. 

(3) If you are not working in a dusty or dirty environment, and if there are no fans on or serious air flow, and if you are taking a roll of Elegance Velvet out and are literally putting it right onto the printer and print on it immediately, you should not have any issues. If you still have issues, the problem may be within your printer. If you print on other fine art papers in the same environment on the exact same printer, and the other fine art papers don't have the same problem, then it could be that you have a defective roll. 

If this is the case, we will ask you to send one of your unopened rolls to us so that we can test it in our controlled environment. If we find the product to be defective, we will replace your rolls or provide you with a refund immediately. Please understand that because defective issues with Elegance Velvet are around .01%, and this .01% is not from flaking, we must have you complete issues #1-3 above before we can proceed to performing our own tests. To date, you must keep in mind that we have never had a defective roll of Elegance Velvet returned because it actually was flaking.

If you are using the ImagePrint RIP (Raster-Image Processor) from Colorbyte, most of our inkjet canvas and fine art papers have been profiled by their technicians and are available for free download on their website. You may obtain them by clicking here.

*This article will help if you are looking for Imageprint profiles, Colorbyte profiles, profiles for RIP, RIP to use with Breathing Color.

Art Peel SUL

If you are using a RIP from Colorbyte, Onyx, Wasatch, Ergosoft, or any other, you will need to contact them and they will be able to make you profiles for our papers. Please contact one of our media specialists who you can speak to you about receiving a credit for a specific amount of material that you can send to your RIP manufacturer. Typically, no more than 5 sheets of 11"x17", or the equivalent amount of square feet on a roll, are required. Your RIP manufacturer should be able to get this done within a few weeks.

Often we get support issues from our customers telling us that Elegance Velvet is flaking terribly when they print, causing voids to become apparent when the flakes fall off. We also are occasionally told that Elegance Velvet has a large amount of debris on the surface. 

Neither of these are true of Elegance Velvet. This fine art paper is made with an inkjet receptive coating that does not flake, and is also very resistant to scuffing. 

If you believe your Elegance Velvet roll is flaking, here are a few things to check on: 

(1) Are you working in a particularly dusty environment? If your printers are in a dusty or dirty environment, this is definitely going to affect your prints. Dust and debris can get into the inside of your printer, they can also affect your heads which could cause voids in printed image. Furthermore, if your fine art paper roll is exposed (not in its plastic) for short periods of time, the dust and debris will land on the roll. This brings us to the next issue -

(2) How long was your Elegance Velvet fine art paper roll left "exposed" (meaning, without plastic covering and also not in its original box)? Leaving your roll of fine art paper (or canvas) exposed for even short periods of time is dangerous because all sorts of debris will definitely attach itself to the roll. This doesn't even matter if you think your environment is very clean. The particles that will affect your roll are extremely small, they travel without the help of any wind (when people walk on carpet, or even when people breathe -- you can imagine what a ceiling fan or a standing floor fan will do), and they are everywhere. If you have left your roll of fine art paper exposed for a few hours, depending upon your environment and where you actually placed the roll, your roll is probably affected with debris. The right practice is to only open the roll when you plan on printing it. When it is not printing, you should put the roll back into its plastic cover and then into its original box. Note: Don't ever put the roll back into its original box without the plastic. Also, don't ever substitute the plastic cover for anything else - such as Kraft Paper. Both Cardboard boxes and Kraft Paper are acidic. 

(3) If you are not working in a dusty or dirty environment, and if there are no fans on or serious air flow, and if you are taking a roll of Elegance Velvet out and are literally putting it right onto the printer and print on it immediately, you should not have any issues. If you still have issues, the problem may be within your printer. If you print on other fine art papers in the same environment on the exact same printer, and the other fine art papers don't have the same problem, then it could be that you have a defective roll. 

If this is the case, we will ask you to send one of your unopened rolls to us so that we can test it in our controlled environment. If we find the product to be defective, we will replace your rolls or provide you with a refund immediately. Please understand that because defective issues with Elegance Velvet are around .01%, and this .01% is not from flaking, we must have you complete issues #1-3 above before we can proceed to performing our own tests. To date, you must keep in mind that we have never had a defective roll of Elegance Velvet returned because it actually was flaking.

If you are using the ImagePrint RIP (Raster-Image Processor) from Colorbyte, most of our inkjet canvas and fine art papers have been profiled by their technicians and are available for free download on their website. You may obtain them by clicking here.

*This article will help if you are looking for Imageprint profiles, Colorbyte profiles, profiles for RIP, RIP to use with Breathing Color.

Glamour 2

If you still have streaks, there are a few things you need to focus on:

(1) How much are you diluting with water? Try adding more water (at least 40%). 

 
(2) Before adding the water to the coating, heat it in the microwave for about 8 to 10 seconds depending on how much water you are adding. The water should be above luke warm but not boiling. The heated water will help in mixing with Glamour II Veneer. 

(3) When stirring the heated water and Glamour II Veneer together, stir lightly and slowly. If you try to mix them together too fast or too aggressively, it can create air bubbles that are difficult to get out of the coating once it is applied to the print. Once dried, these air bubbles are even more visible and can ruin your print. 

(4) When you are first applying Glamour II Veneer to your inkjet canvas or fine art paper, be very generous with the application. Some of our customers even find success in pouring the coating directly onto the print in even lines across the whole print. Once this is done, the foam roller is then just used to spread the Glamour II Veneer around evenly. 

(5) If you decide to apply Glamour II Veneer without pouring it straight onto the inkjet canvas or fine art paper and instead apply it with the foam roller directly, make sure to stay away from any bumby parts of the tray with the foam roller. When you are moving the roller around in the tray to saturate it with Glamour II Veneer, the bumbs can cause indentations in the foam which will transfer over to your prints and ultimately leave some service uncovered. 

(6) Try to go over the print with the foam roller the least amount of times possible. We have found that the more times you run your foam roller over the Glamour II Veneer, the more coating you are actually taking off of the print. If you still see lines in the coating, wait until it dries to see if they go away. If you have been generous enough with the coating, the leveling agents in the Glamour II Veneer will cause the streaks to go away as it is drying.

(7) Apply the least amount of pressure possible when going over your inkjet canvas or fine art paper with the Glamour II Veneer. Pressure will cause indentations in the coating which will cause streaks once it has dried. 

*This article will help if you have streaks, streaking, or lines when trying to apply Glamour II.

Print Varnish

If you still have streaks, there are a few things you need to focus on:

(1) How much are you diluting with water? Try adding more water (at least 40%). 

 
(2) Before adding the water to the coating, heat it in the microwave for about 8 to 10 seconds depending on how much water you are adding. The water should be above luke warm but not boiling. The heated water will help in mixing with Glamour II Veneer. 

(3) When stirring the heated water and Glamour II Veneer together, stir lightly and slowly. If you try to mix them together too fast or too aggressively, it can create air bubbles that are difficult to get out of the coating once it is applied to the print. Once dried, these air bubbles are even more visible and can ruin your print. 

(4) When you are first applying Glamour II Veneer to your inkjet canvas or fine art paper, be very generous with the application. Some of our customers even find success in pouring the coating directly onto the print in even lines across the whole print. Once this is done, the foam roller is then just used to spread the Glamour II Veneer around evenly. 

(5) If you decide to apply Glamour II Veneer without pouring it straight onto the inkjet canvas or fine art paper and instead apply it with the foam roller directly, make sure to stay away from any bumby parts of the tray with the foam roller. When you are moving the roller around in the tray to saturate it with Glamour II Veneer, the bumbs can cause indentations in the foam which will transfer over to your prints and ultimately leave some service uncovered. 

(6) Try to go over the print with the foam roller the least amount of times possible. We have found that the more times you run your foam roller over the Glamour II Veneer, the more coating you are actually taking off of the print. If you still see lines in the coating, wait until it dries to see if they go away. If you have been generous enough with the coating, the leveling agents in the Glamour II Veneer will cause the streaks to go away as it is drying.

(7) Apply the least amount of pressure possible when going over your inkjet canvas or fine art paper with the Glamour II Veneer. Pressure will cause indentations in the coating which will cause streaks once it has dried. 

*This article will help if you have streaks, streaking, or lines when trying to apply Glamour II.

Timeless

If you still have streaks, there are a few things you need to focus on:

(1) How much are you diluting with water? Try adding more water (at least 40%). 

 
(2) Before adding the water to the coating, heat it in the microwave for about 8 to 10 seconds depending on how much water you are adding. The water should be above luke warm but not boiling. The heated water will help in mixing with Glamour II Veneer. 

(3) When stirring the heated water and Glamour II Veneer together, stir lightly and slowly. If you try to mix them together too fast or too aggressively, it can create air bubbles that are difficult to get out of the coating once it is applied to the print. Once dried, these air bubbles are even more visible and can ruin your print. 

(4) When you are first applying Glamour II Veneer to your inkjet canvas or fine art paper, be very generous with the application. Some of our customers even find success in pouring the coating directly onto the print in even lines across the whole print. Once this is done, the foam roller is then just used to spread the Glamour II Veneer around evenly. 

(5) If you decide to apply Glamour II Veneer without pouring it straight onto the inkjet canvas or fine art paper and instead apply it with the foam roller directly, make sure to stay away from any bumby parts of the tray with the foam roller. When you are moving the roller around in the tray to saturate it with Glamour II Veneer, the bumbs can cause indentations in the foam which will transfer over to your prints and ultimately leave some service uncovered. 

(6) Try to go over the print with the foam roller the least amount of times possible. We have found that the more times you run your foam roller over the Glamour II Veneer, the more coating you are actually taking off of the print. If you still see lines in the coating, wait until it dries to see if they go away. If you have been generous enough with the coating, the leveling agents in the Glamour II Veneer will cause the streaks to go away as it is drying.

(7) Apply the least amount of pressure possible when going over your inkjet canvas or fine art paper with the Glamour II Veneer. Pressure will cause indentations in the coating which will cause streaks once it has dried. 

*This article will help if you have streaks, streaking, or lines when trying to apply Glamour II.