FAQ

No, none. The Art Peel can be removed and re-applied many times without worrying about your wall or surface.

Art Peel can be re-positioned months after being applied.

Both Timeless and Glamour 2 have a 6 month to a year shelf life, in proper storage conditions. We recommend a temperature-controlled environment in 65 – 75 degrees (F), 35-65% relative humidity, no direct sunlight on the containers, and preferably in the original screw-top containers or an airtight container of your own.

We have a better solution for you! Canvas works great with our Canvas Floater Frames, which are very similar to the RMFs but designed just for canvas. 

The RMFs are designed to work with fine art paper (such as our Pura Smooth) or photo papers (such as our Vibrance Gloss). Simply print your image, and place behind the glass and hold in place with the backing board. Easy!

The Ready Made Frames contain all or part of the following: pre-assembled frame, front glass panel, backing board, and matte board. See individual product pages for more information.

They are made of high quality wood or composite wood. Hand-crafted in the USA.

Our customers use a wide range of different staple guns from the hand-held mechanical type, to electic, to pneumatic ones. The one that's best for you will depend on your budget and your volume. Low volume printers will be fine with the hand-held versions, while higher volume will be best of with an electric gun. Many say that pneumatic guns are the most durable and repairable in case of damage. These pneumatic guns are of course often the most expensive ones.

We make the StretchRelief canvas stretching pliers specifically to stretch canvas prints quickly, easily, and as tight as possible. All without putting strain on your hands and wrists. Find out more!

Pre-notched stretcher bars are easy to assemble--simply slide the notches together to build your frame. No joining equipment is required to assemble the frame. Stretching pliers and a staple gun will be required in order to stretch your canvas prints.

Our 1.5" wide pre-notched stretcher bars are made from high-quality fir wood.

Our average customer can stretch a 30"x30" canvas in about 2 minutes. We have customers than can do it in a minute even.

All of the stapling is done from the front, you do not have to reach around or walk behind large art. As a result it is much easier to re-position the art and make folds in place.

Yes we do. Our Breathing Color technical support team members have use the Gallery Stretcher many times. If your question(s) are beyond our scope, we would be more than happy to put you in touch with the manufacturers of the machine to help out further. There is no problem that we can't resolve!

Yes we do. Please click here to locate your Breathing Color dealer and give them a call.

Yes. It will require finishing the corners with a pair of canvas pliers.

It can handle stretcher bar between 3/4″ – 2 1/2″ wide and there are no height restrictions.

We are constantly improving our inventory, so check back often! Send us an email or give us a call with any feedback on additional sizes you think we should carry. We're always open to suggestions!

When printing on canvas or fine art paper, it is critical that the prints be allowed to dry and outgass fully before they are mounted, stretched, and/or framed. Finishing these prints prematurely can cause a whole host of problems from splotchy glass when framing, to pin holes and bubbles while coating in preparation for stretching. Read more about dry time and outgassing on our blog.

The EasyWrappe extenders enable you to create stretcher bars at custom sizes that are not normally offered on our product page. See our blog article for photos and much more information.

Our general rule is 2-3 minutes. To read more, click here.

Epson UltraChrome K3 pigment ink technology, for Epson 9800, Epson 7800, and Epson 4800

In addition to cyan, magenta, yellow, light cyan and light magenta, UltraChrome K3 features a special three-level black ink system that simultaneously uses black, light black and light-light black to create professional neutral and toned black and white prints from a single ink set. Epson UltraChrome K3 inks also boast output without color crossover or color casts. In addition to professional-quality black and white output, UltraChrome K3 produces higher degrees of color fidelity and stable colors superior to other ink technologies. K3 inks are available when using the Epson 9800, Epson 7800, and Epson 4800 printers.

Epson UltraChrome K3 Ink Technology - Unbelievable Color Gamut and Dmax when used with the right inkjet canvas and fine art paper

"Epson has a legacy of providing photographers and digital artists with the tools that enable them to express their vision. The Epson Stylus Photo R2400 and the new Epson UltraChrome K3 inks produce stunning color prints in addition to black and white prints that look and feel like traditional silver halide prints," said Patrick Chen, product manager, photo imaging, Epson America. "Quite simply, this printer with its Epson UltraChrome K3 inks will redefine photographic printing in the industry with the next level of uncompromising quality, ease of use and print permanance." Epson offers an extensive array of award-winning image capture and image output products for the consumer, business, photography and graphic arts markets. The company is also a leading supplier of value-added point-of-sale (POS) printers and transactions terminals for the retail market. Founded in 1975, Epson America Inc. is the U.S. affiliate of Japan-based Seiko Epson Corporation, a global manufacturer and supplier of high-quality technology products that meet customer demands for increased functionality, compactness, systems integration and energy efficiency. Epson America Inc. is headquartered in Long Beach, Calif.

For our various canvas media, we recommend setting your printer's platen gap setting to "Wider".

The HP Designjet Z2100 Photo Printer (24" and 44" models) is an 8-ink wide-format printer, similar in ink technology to the 13-inch wide HP B9180. However, where the B9180 has a built in densitometer, the HP Z2100 goes one better, with the first-ever embedded spectrophotometer -- allowing one to easily create and edit ICC profiles, saving one the time and expense of outsourcing the ICC creation. The Z2100 24" model has a list price of $3,395.00, and the Z2100 44" model has a list price of $5,595.

The HP Designjet Z3100 Photo Printer (24" and 44" models) is a 12-ink wide-format printer, available with the same embedded spectrophotometer technology as the Z2100. This 12-ink printer includes the HP 70 Gloss Enhancer, producing a more uniform gloss (less gloss differential) on glossy, semi-gloss and luster surface photo papers. The inkset also includes the HP Quad-Black Inks to create beautiful black and white prints and achieve truly neutral greys under different lighting conditions. This printer series will not be available until December 2006, and no pricing has been published yet in the U.S.

Both printer series use the Vivera pigment inks which deliver exceptional fade resistance, producing prints that resist fading for over 200 years (certified by Wilhelm Imaging Research), and on a range of HP creative and specialty media.

For more information on this inkjet printer please visit the Giclee Printer Review.

What makes art sell? Why are some artists making millions of dollars while others struggling to afford paint brushes? While there are many factors involved in the prosperity of one artist to another, by far the most critical is the aesthetic appeal the artwork itself. Simply put, the more visually appealing a particular work of art is, the better it will sell. Whether art is being shown as originals or prints, in a gallery or at an art show, the consumer is primarily influenced by the visual appeal of their prospective purchase and subsequently, its perceived value. Publishers, printmakers, framers, gallery owners, and of course the artists themselves all (directly or indirectly) profit from art sales. Collectively they share a common goal of selling art; while individually they strive to create a rich environment for art sales to take place, at the greatest possible rate. The artist creates the most visually appealing rendition of their art possible so consumers will be drawn to it, the publisher prints the best possible catalogue to increase exposure and prestige; framer matches the art with a frame that becomes an visual extension of the painting, and the printmaker produces the most vibrant, accurate, and sellable print possible through equipment selection, experience, and talent. While each of these players is involved in the overall sell-ability of art, the purpose of this article is to focus on the printmaker and his/her influence on the visual appeal of a fine art reproduction.

As a printmaker there are an overwhelming amount of variables involved in reproducing a sellable print. Aside from experience, knowledge, and raw talent, which are extremely important, a profitable printmaker learns to intelligently blend controllable variables with uncontrollable variables to reproduce the best possible prints. Controllable variables are aspects of the process that can be objectively defined in absolutes values. For example, a printmaker can determine the absolute highest black density (DMAX) or widest color gamut that a particular substrate or ink is able to achieve, thus creating the most visually appealing print. These data are measurable facts, not a matter of opinion. Uncontrollable variables are also a key contributing factor in creating the visual appeal and sale-ability of an art reproduction. Unlike the controllable variables, these rely primarily on subjective opinions such as media weight, thickness, white-point, texture, and substrate type. While many artists have preconceived preferences, the most successful printmakers are those who influence this process with personal experience and industry knowledge of market trends. Mark Leftoff, President of Gallery Street (www.gallerystreet.com) in Atlanta, GA provides some recommendation on how to add as some objectivity to this process.

First, select a media type and finish that, based upon the history of successful art pieces, will best suit a particular image. We typically recommend canvas first because with a higher perceived value to the end consumer, it can be sold at a higher price or in greater volume which in turn creates more financial reward for our customers. If a customer prefers to use matte fine art paper, we may even print some small swatches on different media in order to find a fit for their image that we all believe will result in the most success. We encourage our customers to test market these samples by getting some opinions from a handful of their own customers who will be buying the art. We believe that by including more professionals in the process we can minimize risk and more accurately assess the marketability of every print. It is in this manner that we work alongside our customers and together make educated business decisions on how to select the best media for every print job.

The most successful printmakers typically select a standard in house media based upon objective testing and industry experience. Most have chosen a smooth paper, a velvet finish paper, a heavily textured paper, and a canvas or two. A couple of different weights and finish are usually offered as well. This enables them to accurately match the proper media type, texture and weight, with a particular image to maximize sell-ability. It is also important for the artist to offer a couple of different options to their prospective art buyers/gallery owners to determine the most sellable option. When selecting which brand of media to permanently offer to their artists, these decisions are based upon controllable variables or hard facts such as determining which substrate produces the best colors, the best blacks, shows the best detail, and will last the longest.

By far the most important considerations in using any given fine art media on the market are color and longevity. This means that above all, our media must be measurably superior in achieving the widest color gamut and highest Dmax possible. In this business, color can make you or break you. This guarantees MFA Talon Graphics that the paper we are using produces the best color on our reproductions. Then we must consider how long the color will last without fading or yellowing. MFA Talon Graphics chooses fine art media from a quality in, quality out perspective. This is how we continually deliver on our promise to our customers, says Teddy Blah (Head Printmaker at MFA Talon Graphics of El Segundo, CA).

While many printmakers may wrestle with the decision of which media to stock, or learn through a process of trial and error, the most profitable and experienced printmakers understand one important fact art sells based upon how it looks. Those who offer a wide range of high-performance substrates and have the industry knowledge and market experience to suggest which substrate is most suitable or sellable with a particular image will be the most profitable. By offering substandard media or selecting the wrong substrate for a particular image, not only are you devaluing your own quality and expertise as a printmaker, but also that of the artists themselves. This will inevitably result in the loss of printing business to a competitor. With the exponential growth of the printmaking industry, every competitive advantage must be pursued to ensure the prosperity of your small business. Therefore, the key to success as a fine art printmaker is to produce the most visually appealing, archival, and sellable prints possible.

How to change the photo/matte ink in the Epson 7600 and 9600 printers without using the costly Epson draining procedure:

1 - Make sure your printer is not switched on
2 - Open the ink cartridge lever in the ink cartridge bay
3 - Replace the photo black cartridge with the matte black cartridge (or vice versa)
4 - Leave the ink lever open !
5 - Using the printer control panel go into Maintenance Mode 2 by switching power ON while pushing the 'Paper source', 'Cut/Eject', and 'Paper Feed down' buttons.
6 - Press the 'Paper Feed down' button until you see "SERVICE CONFIG" on the display - press the 'arrow right' button. It then shows 'XXD' in the lower part of the display.
7 - Press the 'Paper Feed down' button until you see "NPD" - press 'arrow right' button. A value of '1' appears in the display.
8 - There are 3 possible value settings for NPD:
0 - no ink check
1 - pigmented ink (there should be s star "*" at this setting)
2 - dye inks
9 - Change NPD setting to '0' (no ink check) and press "Enter" - a star should now show next to the '0' value
10 -Switch printer off
11 - Switch printer on
12 - Close the ink lever in the ink cartridge bay
13 - Printer and driver shows the matte black ink is installed (or photo black ink)
You can use the same procedure to switch from matte black to photo black or from photo black to matte black. What happens is that once you change the ink in that way the printer re-sets the 'NPD' value back to '1' the next time you switch on the printer in the normal way (non maintenance mode).

We do our absolute best to package our customer orders with good quality boxes and packing materials strictly because it is a necessary step in delivering a "love at first sight experience" to our customers. Unfortunately, when your order leaves our shipping facilities it is out of our hands and in the hands of freight carriers who can negatively impact our protocal despite our best efforts. Occassionally, our customers receive packages from UPS that have been egregiously damaged in some way. Damages include:

- boxes being ripped open in some areas leaving exposed product or damaged product
- boxes being wet from being left in the rain or subject to an accident
- boxes being severely dented or distressed, causing damage to your products

When UPS does this, you are entitled to recourse. The recourse amount will be the insured amount, and rest assured Breathing Color insures every single order for the full amount. Based upon our experiences, here are the procedures you need to follow in order to be eligible for recourse:

(1) If you have not opened anything yet, take some digital pictures of the damaged shipment
(2) Save every damaged box because UPS will require to see it for themselves
(3) contact UPS and submit your complaint immediately

 

It is possible that your ISP provider or email program has an automated spam filter activated. Here are some soultions to disable that feature for different types of email programs / ISP providers:

Many Internet Service Providers (ISP) such as AOL, Yahoo and MSN Hotmail have SPAM filters to give you greater control over what e-mails reach your inbox to help you avoid unwanted junk e-mail. Unfortunately, these filters can block e-mails you wish to receive from Breathing Color unless you add store@breathingcolor.com to your e-mail address book and/or update your e-mail program's white list or filters.

Below are instructions for the most common ISP or e-mail programs. (Different versions may have slight variations to the steps.)

AOL Subscribers:
1. From your mailbox screen click on the drop down arrow to the right of the 'Mail Options' and then click on 'Address Book'.
2. Click the 'Add' button ('Add Contact' for version 8.0).
3. Type in or cut and paste store@breathingcolor.com into the 'Screen Name' block and then click 'Save'.

Juno/Netzero Subscribers:
1. From your mailbox screen click on the 'Address Book' tab.
2. Next to the 'Lists' tab click the 'Add new contact' link.
3. Type in or cut and paste store@breathingcolor.com into the 'E-mail Address' block, and then click the 'Save' button.

Earthlink Webmail Subscribers:
1. From your mailbox screen click on the 'Address Book'.
2. Click the 'Add' button.
3. Type in or cut and paste store@breathingcolor.com into the 'E-mail' block and then click the 'Save' button.

Hotmail Subscribers:
1. Select the 'Options' links in the upper right of the screen.
2. Click on 'Contacts' link on the left part of the screen.
3. Click on 'Safe List'.
4. Type in or cut and paste store@breathingcolor.com into the box and then click 'Add'.

Yahoo Subscribers:
1. From your mailbox screen click on the drop down arrow to the right of the 'Addresses' and then click on 'Add Contact'.
2. Type in or cut and paste store@breathingcolor.com into the 'E-mail' box and then click 'Save'.

G-mail Subscribers:
 From your mailbox, select 'Filters tab.
 Select 'Create a Filter'.
 Type in or cut and paste store@breathingcolor.com in the 'From' field.
 Set 'Choose Action' to be 'Star it'.

Microsoft Outlook (most versions):
1. From your 'Inbox', select 'File' 'New' and then 'Contact'.
2. Create a contact in your address book for store@breathingcolor.com (Copy email address into the 'E-mail' field and click 'Save and Close' button.).
3. From your Inbox select 'Tools' then select 'Organize'.
4. In 'Ways to Organize Inbox', select 'Using Folders'.
5. Create a rule to move new messages store@breathingcolor.com to 'Inbox' and then click the 'Create' button.
6. Click the 'X' in the upper right section when done to close the dialogue box and return to Outlook.

If you are using a RIP from Colorbyte, Onyx, Wasatch, Ergosoft, or any other, you will need to contact them and they will be able to make you profiles for our papers. Please contact one of our media specialists who you can speak to you about receiving a credit for a specific amount of material that you can send to your RIP manufacturer. Typcially, no more than 5 sheets of 11"x17", or the equivalent amount of square feet on a roll, are required. Your RIP manufacturer should be able to get this done within a few weeks.

Dilute more. If you dilute less than 30% with water, the more likely this is to happen. If you are diluting with 30% already, try 40% or even 50% to reduce tackiness. Make sure the coating has completely dried and is no longer sticky before storing prints face-to-face or putting them behind a temporary frame that you ultimately intend to remove. Also try using a thinner coat. If you are using too much product, this could happen.

Whenever you are placing any signage outdoors where it is going to be subject to environmental conditions (i.e. humidity, UV rays, etc.) we always recommend using liquid lamination (specifically, our Glamour II Veneer Aqueous coating). Also, sheet lamination is always another option. Collectively, some form of protective lamination should always be used for any long term outdoor signage.

Without any lamination, although these products are semi-archival you would only expect to use them for short-term purposes. The exact time will depend on the environmental factors of your specific climate. But no significant deterioration/fading of color should occur within a 3-6 month period. Both Adhesive Vinyl and Vitality Banner are highly water resistant and weather resistant (Vitality Banner especially) and are without any doubt amongst the top of their class and will therefore perform equally if not better than any other competitive products in the marketplace.

The reason that 100% Pure Silk is not found on our website any longer is because we have fully discontinued this product line. Breathing Color Inc is still in the development stages of Inkjet Fabric printing. Please check back often for updates and news on new products coming out in the near future!

When printing in a high-output environment, often times printmakers are not physically babysitting" their printer as it works through a roll. In this situation, a printmaker will find it helpful for the canvas/paper to detach itself from the roll once it has reached the end. This way the printer knows that the roll is finished and stops printing. However, depending upon how the media was converted, some inkjet substrates may have a tendency to do just the opposite and stay attached to the core once the end of the roll has been reached. If you are experiencing this problem with a particular media, a short term solution is to simply calculate the length of the roll and set the print job to not exceed that predetermined length. 

A good rule of thumb us to stop three feet short of the known end of the roll. A long term solution is to inform the media manufacturer so they can take the proper steps to modify the attachment adhesive on their next conversion of the product. Simply using a less aggressive adhesive in the converting process will solve the problem. At Breathing Color, we are aware of this situation and have taken the necessary steps ensure that all of our products are as user-friendly as possible. If you are experiencing detachment issues with any Breathing Color product, kindly let us know, so we can investigate and make the proper adjustments.

Optical Brightener Additives (commonly referred to as OBA's) are widely used in paper coatings, textiles, and laundry detergents to increase the perceived "whiteness" of the treated products. OBA's work by absorbing light from the (invisible) ultra-violet end of the spectrum and emitting light in the (visible) blue/white range of the spectrum. This shift in the frequency of light energy, results in a whiter and brighter appearance of the treated product.

Many digital inkjet printmakers, who print using Epson 9800, Epson 7800, Epson 4800, and/or Canon imagePROGRAF iPF9000 prefer a bright white surface to print on, to the true surface color of their naturally-yellow substrate. As a result, paper manufacturers are adding OBAs to the digital inkjet receptive coating (IRC) used on their fine art papers and inkjet canvas'. The reflection of white light emanating from the OBAs will completely overwhelm the paper's natural color, creating a higher perceived whiteness, which artificially enhances the maximum color gamut and black density of the printed image. Popular rag papers that contain OBAs are the Hahnemuhle Photo Rag, Somerset Velvet, and Breathing Color Elegance. These papers are known for their bright white surface and excellent color gamut and black density.

While OBA's appear to be an effective solution for enhancing the whiteness and overall image quality of inkjet paper, this conclusion is slightly premature. The fact is, that OBA's can pose a serious threat to the integrity and longevity of a fine art print by accelerating metamerism and causing color shifts, and yellowing over time. Let us explore each of these issues in further detail.

What is metamerism? Harald Johnson defines metamerism as a normal phenomenon relating to how the human eye perceives color. It occurs when "two different color objects have the same color appearance to a normal human viewer under one light source (metameric match) but look different under another light source (metameric mismatch)." (*1) To a printmaker, this means that the painstakingly precise color information applied to each print will be compromised whenever that print is viewed under a different light source. Thus, one primary goal of any printmaker should be to avoid metamerism in order to validate the time spent on color management and to uphold the integrity of the reproduction. After all, what good is a reproduction if it does not closely match the original?

Now that we understand metamerism and why it should be avoided, how do OBAs fit into the picture? When OBAs are exposed to UV light, the treated paper appears brighter and whiter. When OBAs are not exposed to UV light (in the evening), the OBA's "lose activity", causing your eye to actually see the paper color without OBAs - which will look creamy or somewhat yellowed. This amount of "OBA activity loss" will vary constantly depending upon how much exposure the paper has to UV light. Picture the lighting conditions inside of an art gallery and how they will change depending upon the time of day. This will have a subsequent effect on the art itself, as it is exposed to various levels of UV light throughout the day. For example, your print could be displayed in a gallery near a window where direct or indirect daylight may be illuminating the print. In a case like this, where there is a high UV component, inkjet papers that contain OBA's will strongly fluoresce and will appear bright white. However, in the evening when the same print is displayed with low or non-existent UV component (or incandescent tungsten illumination), the OBAs will not fluoresce, making the paper appear yellow, therefore causing your eyes to see the image color differently.

How does this happen? Think about it. Your "bright white" paper is profiled to your printer so that the computer can translate color information accurately to the substrate. Anyone with experience creating color profiles will tell you that the "white point" of your substrate is an integral component of a profile's accuracy. If the whiteness of your paper changes, so must your profile. This is precisely how OBAs are constantly working against your color management. As the perception of whiteness of the paper is constantly changing, so do the perception of colors. Here's a good test. If you can find a paper offered in both bright-white and natural-white, try using the natural-white paper printing profile on the bright-white paper. You will be surprised by how different your results will be.

Next, take both papers and observe the whiteness in broad daylight. The paper with optical brighteners should look extremely bright white, while the paper without optical brighteners will look creamy. Then, take the two papers indoors where they are exposed to no sunlight and observe the whiteness. You probably will not be able to tell a difference between the two. At the very least, you will notice that the paper with OBAs no longer looks so white and bright. Many times, the OBA-Free paper will appear whiter. Nevertheless, the important point is that your OBA-Free paper has remained consistent under both lighting conditions, while the paper with OBAs has been inconsistent. This inconsistency directly correlates to the inconsistency that your image color will have under different lighting conditions. Still, overall white point is only one of the risks associated with using substrates that contain OBAs.

Another problem with OBAs is that they have been known to decompose over time and can cause yellow stains to appear on your prints. It is possible to avoid this issue with UV inhibiting products and overcoats that are designed to reduce the UV activation of OBAs, but their effectiveness in this regard has yet to be proven. Therefore, regardless of the post-print protective coating that can be applied, the fact remains that any fine art print made on a paper manufactured with OBAs is a print at risk. To quote Henry Wilhelm from the Wilhelm Research Institute, "When long-term image permanence is an important consideration - or may eventually become an important consideration - fluorescent brighteners should be avoided".

This associated risk is precisely why OBA-Free papers have rapidly gained popularity in recent years despite their "Natural White" color, which could be considered creamy or even yellow. Of course some printmakers have chosen to use OBA-Free papers because they specifically like the warm tone of the paper, but the majority of the market is avoiding papers manufactured with OBAs because they (1) enhance metamerism and (2) they are a potential risk to the longevity and integrity of a substrate. A few examples of popular OBA-free papers are Epson's Ultrasmooth Fine Art Paper, and Breathing Color's Sterling Rag 210.

Printmakers who use OBA-Free papers simply eliminate the entire element of what can be called "OBA-associated Risk" from their business. These printmakers know that metamerism is a problem that should be minimized whenever possible - certainly never enhanced. Furthermore, OBA's have degradation potential and up to this point there is no guarantee that anything will last. Nevertheless, if an artist or photographer specifically requests that their artwork be printed on a paper manufactured with OBA's, a disclaimer should be issued, clearly explaining the facts and associated risks. Ultimately the customer should be left with the decision of how they want their art to look.

In an industry so obsessively tied to color accuracy and long-term print stability, it is a wonder why OBA-Free papers are not more commonly used than papers manufactured with OBA's. Art sells because of how it looks and in this business there is no room for error. Therefore, anyone who is involved in this relatively infant industry of selling printed art has genuine incentive to make color integrity a top priority. As further research is performed on the subject of OBA's, this industry will become more educated which will most likely cause a shift towards the widespread use of OBA-Free papers.

It is for this reason that Breathing Color has been conducting a great deal of research and development in quality paper manufacturing, which has resulted in the latest technological breakthrough "Chromata White". The Chromata White technology allows Breathing Color to create a highly stable white base paper/canvas without the use of harmful OBA's or any other fluorescent brightening additives. Color shifting is reduced by stabilizing the whiteness of the base substrate with a special anti-oxidation technology that even further protects printed images. Furthermore, metamerism is minimized by quenching the ultraviolet excitation wavelengths resulting in a more stable illumination of an image under different spectral power distributions.

By using Chromata White inkjet papers and canvas', printmakers now have the opportunity to get the best of both worlds. They eliminate all OBA-associated risk, and they have bright white surfaces to make beautiful prints that uphold the highest standards of color integrity that are possible today.

Because Brilliance Chromata White Inkjet Canvas is a cotton/poly blend, when it comes in contact with our water based Glamour II Veneer liquid laminate, some shrinkage of the canvas may occur. This is due to the reaction of the cotton when introduced to the water content in water based coatings. Since our inkjet canvas is not 100% cotton, shrinkage is minimal. When shrinkage does occur, the canvas tends to shrink only in one direction and usually it will shrink the exact same amount every time coating is applied, relative to print size. To control for canvas shrinkage, try to stretch each print within a few days after the print has been coated. Also, because the shrinkage will be less than one inch and very consistent, you can also make the adjustment and account for the shrinkage in Photoshop or in your RIP software.

We would recommend using gator board rather than Masonite. The main reason being Masonite has been known to warp, gator board is a lot more consistent, and you will not run into a problem getting the Glamour II to adhere to the gator board.

The best way to protect coated prints when stacking or sending out to ship would be to wrap the print in Glassine paper.  You do not want to separate your prints with paper that contains acid in it.  If acid comes into contact with your print it may cause the print to turn yellow.  You can find many different types of Glassine papers online, or at your nearest art supply store.  The main thing to keep in mind when looking for this type of paper is to make sure the paper has a neutral pH level, or acid free.

3542 Solvent Smooth, Matte

That's no problem! There are no height limitations when using the Gallery Stretcher.

For borderless printing, the Epson print engine enlarges the image size slightly (about 5 percent or a bit less) to ensure that the image is not printed with any white edges due to paper misalignment. You can minimize the clipping by resizing your image to actual paper size (e.g., 13" x 19", 4" x 6"), and then setting Print with Preview to center the image and print it at 96% of actual size. The clipping dialog still comes up (it will whenever you are printing in the printer's defined margins), but tell it OK. You can try using 95% if there is still too much clipping.

In this Article we will take a closer look at the Epson 11880 Vivid Magenta Inkset. These are brand new ink cartridges designed for these new Epson Stylus Pro Series printers only. It is first important to note that these vivid magenta inkset cartridges are NOT compatible with older printer models such as the Epson Stylus Pro 9800 and Epson Stylus Pro 7800 . Although they will work, they are reported to ruin the print heads within a short period of time such as 6 months. Althought this information has not been confirmed by a third party Epson user as of the date of this writing, it should be noted. Also note that we are only referring to the two vivid magenta cartirdges; not the other colors which can be used interchangeably with other Epson Stylus Pro Series printer models.

Epson UltraChrome/K3 Ink Technology with Vivid Magenta * High-density pigments for an extremely wide color gamut * New formulation of Magenta pigments for extreme blues and purples * Professional print permanence ratings for truly sellable quality prints * High-gloss Microcrystal Encapsulation technology for reduced gloss differential * Superior scratch resistance from improved pigment and resin chemistry * Color is stable immediately after printing - no short-term color shifting * Produces a black density up to 2.55 with an L* value of 2.9*

Like the older prints by Epson such as the Epson Stylus Pro 9800 and Epson Stylus Pro 7800, these new printers - the Epson 11880, Epson 9880, and Epson 7880 printers have 8-channel printheads. However, these new inkjet printers incorporate the new MicoPiezo AMC Printhead technology. These new heads are quite remarkable in that they have a new ink repelling coating technology which reduces head clogging and by simplifying the need for cleaning these new printheads are especially useful for dusty or linty papers, such as fine art papers or canvas. The printheads also offer more advanced Active Meniscus Control (AMC). Active Meniscus Control is intended to significantly improve dot regularity and dot placement. Although Active Meniscus Control technology was used in prior printer models (this is the third generation), the performance in the Epson 11880 is reported to be stunningly more than 100 times as accurate when compared to a model such as the Epson 9800.

If you hare having problems printing Brilliance Chromata White with either the Epson 7600 or 9600 reguarding the "Reload Paper" dialog, there are settings that may need to be changed to fix this problem.

  • If you have the Platen Gap set to WIDEST change it to WIDE.
  • Edit the setting on the printer to turn off "Paper Size Check" - PPR SIZE CHK = OFF
  • Wihin your printer driver configure the "Paper Suction" to -1

3547 Textured Solvent Matte Art

That's no problem! There are no height limitations when using the Gallery Stretcher.

For borderless printing, the Epson print engine enlarges the image size slightly (about 5 percent or a bit less) to ensure that the image is not printed with any white edges due to paper misalignment. You can minimize the clipping by resizing your image to actual paper size (e.g., 13" x 19", 4" x 6"), and then setting Print with Preview to center the image and print it at 96% of actual size. The clipping dialog still comes up (it will whenever you are printing in the printer's defined margins), but tell it OK. You can try using 95% if there is still too much clipping.

In this Article we will take a closer look at the Epson 11880 Vivid Magenta Inkset. These are brand new ink cartridges designed for these new Epson Stylus Pro Series printers only. It is first important to note that these vivid magenta inkset cartridges are NOT compatible with older printer models such as the Epson Stylus Pro 9800 and Epson Stylus Pro 7800 . Although they will work, they are reported to ruin the print heads within a short period of time such as 6 months. Althought this information has not been confirmed by a third party Epson user as of the date of this writing, it should be noted. Also note that we are only referring to the two vivid magenta cartirdges; not the other colors which can be used interchangeably with other Epson Stylus Pro Series printer models.

Epson UltraChrome/K3 Ink Technology with Vivid Magenta * High-density pigments for an extremely wide color gamut * New formulation of Magenta pigments for extreme blues and purples * Professional print permanence ratings for truly sellable quality prints * High-gloss Microcrystal Encapsulation technology for reduced gloss differential * Superior scratch resistance from improved pigment and resin chemistry * Color is stable immediately after printing - no short-term color shifting * Produces a black density up to 2.55 with an L* value of 2.9*

Like the older prints by Epson such as the Epson Stylus Pro 9800 and Epson Stylus Pro 7800, these new printers - the Epson 11880, Epson 9880, and Epson 7880 printers have 8-channel printheads. However, these new inkjet printers incorporate the new MicoPiezo AMC Printhead technology. These new heads are quite remarkable in that they have a new ink repelling coating technology which reduces head clogging and by simplifying the need for cleaning these new printheads are especially useful for dusty or linty papers, such as fine art papers or canvas. The printheads also offer more advanced Active Meniscus Control (AMC). Active Meniscus Control is intended to significantly improve dot regularity and dot placement. Although Active Meniscus Control technology was used in prior printer models (this is the third generation), the performance in the Epson 11880 is reported to be stunningly more than 100 times as accurate when compared to a model such as the Epson 9800.

If you hare having problems printing Brilliance Chromata White with either the Epson 7600 or 9600 reguarding the "Reload Paper" dialog, there are settings that may need to be changed to fix this problem.

  • If you have the Platen Gap set to WIDEST change it to WIDE.
  • Edit the setting on the printer to turn off "Paper Size Check" - PPR SIZE CHK = OFF
  • Wihin your printer driver configure the "Paper Suction" to -1

3562 Smooth Solvent Art Paper Gl

That's no problem! There are no height limitations when using the Gallery Stretcher.

For borderless printing, the Epson print engine enlarges the image size slightly (about 5 percent or a bit less) to ensure that the image is not printed with any white edges due to paper misalignment. You can minimize the clipping by resizing your image to actual paper size (e.g., 13" x 19", 4" x 6"), and then setting Print with Preview to center the image and print it at 96% of actual size. The clipping dialog still comes up (it will whenever you are printing in the printer's defined margins), but tell it OK. You can try using 95% if there is still too much clipping.

In this Article we will take a closer look at the Epson 11880 Vivid Magenta Inkset. These are brand new ink cartridges designed for these new Epson Stylus Pro Series printers only. It is first important to note that these vivid magenta inkset cartridges are NOT compatible with older printer models such as the Epson Stylus Pro 9800 and Epson Stylus Pro 7800 . Although they will work, they are reported to ruin the print heads within a short period of time such as 6 months. Althought this information has not been confirmed by a third party Epson user as of the date of this writing, it should be noted. Also note that we are only referring to the two vivid magenta cartirdges; not the other colors which can be used interchangeably with other Epson Stylus Pro Series printer models.

Epson UltraChrome/K3 Ink Technology with Vivid Magenta * High-density pigments for an extremely wide color gamut * New formulation of Magenta pigments for extreme blues and purples * Professional print permanence ratings for truly sellable quality prints * High-gloss Microcrystal Encapsulation technology for reduced gloss differential * Superior scratch resistance from improved pigment and resin chemistry * Color is stable immediately after printing - no short-term color shifting * Produces a black density up to 2.55 with an L* value of 2.9*

Like the older prints by Epson such as the Epson Stylus Pro 9800 and Epson Stylus Pro 7800, these new printers - the Epson 11880, Epson 9880, and Epson 7880 printers have 8-channel printheads. However, these new inkjet printers incorporate the new MicoPiezo AMC Printhead technology. These new heads are quite remarkable in that they have a new ink repelling coating technology which reduces head clogging and by simplifying the need for cleaning these new printheads are especially useful for dusty or linty papers, such as fine art papers or canvas. The printheads also offer more advanced Active Meniscus Control (AMC). Active Meniscus Control is intended to significantly improve dot regularity and dot placement. Although Active Meniscus Control technology was used in prior printer models (this is the third generation), the performance in the Epson 11880 is reported to be stunningly more than 100 times as accurate when compared to a model such as the Epson 9800.

If you hare having problems printing Brilliance Chromata White with either the Epson 7600 or 9600 reguarding the "Reload Paper" dialog, there are settings that may need to be changed to fix this problem.

  • If you have the Platen Gap set to WIDEST change it to WIDE.
  • Edit the setting on the printer to turn off "Paper Size Check" - PPR SIZE CHK = OFF
  • Wihin your printer driver configure the "Paper Suction" to -1

3567 Velvet Solvent Art Paper Gl

That's no problem! There are no height limitations when using the Gallery Stretcher.

For borderless printing, the Epson print engine enlarges the image size slightly (about 5 percent or a bit less) to ensure that the image is not printed with any white edges due to paper misalignment. You can minimize the clipping by resizing your image to actual paper size (e.g., 13" x 19", 4" x 6"), and then setting Print with Preview to center the image and print it at 96% of actual size. The clipping dialog still comes up (it will whenever you are printing in the printer's defined margins), but tell it OK. You can try using 95% if there is still too much clipping.

In this Article we will take a closer look at the Epson 11880 Vivid Magenta Inkset. These are brand new ink cartridges designed for these new Epson Stylus Pro Series printers only. It is first important to note that these vivid magenta inkset cartridges are NOT compatible with older printer models such as the Epson Stylus Pro 9800 and Epson Stylus Pro 7800 . Although they will work, they are reported to ruin the print heads within a short period of time such as 6 months. Althought this information has not been confirmed by a third party Epson user as of the date of this writing, it should be noted. Also note that we are only referring to the two vivid magenta cartirdges; not the other colors which can be used interchangeably with other Epson Stylus Pro Series printer models.

Epson UltraChrome/K3 Ink Technology with Vivid Magenta * High-density pigments for an extremely wide color gamut * New formulation of Magenta pigments for extreme blues and purples * Professional print permanence ratings for truly sellable quality prints * High-gloss Microcrystal Encapsulation technology for reduced gloss differential * Superior scratch resistance from improved pigment and resin chemistry * Color is stable immediately after printing - no short-term color shifting * Produces a black density up to 2.55 with an L* value of 2.9*

Like the older prints by Epson such as the Epson Stylus Pro 9800 and Epson Stylus Pro 7800, these new printers - the Epson 11880, Epson 9880, and Epson 7880 printers have 8-channel printheads. However, these new inkjet printers incorporate the new MicoPiezo AMC Printhead technology. These new heads are quite remarkable in that they have a new ink repelling coating technology which reduces head clogging and by simplifying the need for cleaning these new printheads are especially useful for dusty or linty papers, such as fine art papers or canvas. The printheads also offer more advanced Active Meniscus Control (AMC). Active Meniscus Control is intended to significantly improve dot regularity and dot placement. Although Active Meniscus Control technology was used in prior printer models (this is the third generation), the performance in the Epson 11880 is reported to be stunningly more than 100 times as accurate when compared to a model such as the Epson 9800.

If you hare having problems printing Brilliance Chromata White with either the Epson 7600 or 9600 reguarding the "Reload Paper" dialog, there are settings that may need to be changed to fix this problem.

  • If you have the Platen Gap set to WIDEST change it to WIDE.
  • Edit the setting on the printer to turn off "Paper Size Check" - PPR SIZE CHK = OFF
  • Wihin your printer driver configure the "Paper Suction" to -1

4262 OBA-Free Art Paper

That's no problem! There are no height limitations when using the Gallery Stretcher.

For borderless printing, the Epson print engine enlarges the image size slightly (about 5 percent or a bit less) to ensure that the image is not printed with any white edges due to paper misalignment. You can minimize the clipping by resizing your image to actual paper size (e.g., 13" x 19", 4" x 6"), and then setting Print with Preview to center the image and print it at 96% of actual size. The clipping dialog still comes up (it will whenever you are printing in the printer's defined margins), but tell it OK. You can try using 95% if there is still too much clipping.

In this Article we will take a closer look at the Epson 11880 Vivid Magenta Inkset. These are brand new ink cartridges designed for these new Epson Stylus Pro Series printers only. It is first important to note that these vivid magenta inkset cartridges are NOT compatible with older printer models such as the Epson Stylus Pro 9800 and Epson Stylus Pro 7800 . Although they will work, they are reported to ruin the print heads within a short period of time such as 6 months. Althought this information has not been confirmed by a third party Epson user as of the date of this writing, it should be noted. Also note that we are only referring to the two vivid magenta cartirdges; not the other colors which can be used interchangeably with other Epson Stylus Pro Series printer models.

Epson UltraChrome/K3 Ink Technology with Vivid Magenta * High-density pigments for an extremely wide color gamut * New formulation of Magenta pigments for extreme blues and purples * Professional print permanence ratings for truly sellable quality prints * High-gloss Microcrystal Encapsulation technology for reduced gloss differential * Superior scratch resistance from improved pigment and resin chemistry * Color is stable immediately after printing - no short-term color shifting * Produces a black density up to 2.55 with an L* value of 2.9*

Like the older prints by Epson such as the Epson Stylus Pro 9800 and Epson Stylus Pro 7800, these new printers - the Epson 11880, Epson 9880, and Epson 7880 printers have 8-channel printheads. However, these new inkjet printers incorporate the new MicoPiezo AMC Printhead technology. These new heads are quite remarkable in that they have a new ink repelling coating technology which reduces head clogging and by simplifying the need for cleaning these new printheads are especially useful for dusty or linty papers, such as fine art papers or canvas. The printheads also offer more advanced Active Meniscus Control (AMC). Active Meniscus Control is intended to significantly improve dot regularity and dot placement. Although Active Meniscus Control technology was used in prior printer models (this is the third generation), the performance in the Epson 11880 is reported to be stunningly more than 100 times as accurate when compared to a model such as the Epson 9800.

If you hare having problems printing Brilliance Chromata White with either the Epson 7600 or 9600 reguarding the "Reload Paper" dialog, there are settings that may need to be changed to fix this problem.

  • If you have the Platen Gap set to WIDEST change it to WIDE.
  • Edit the setting on the printer to turn off "Paper Size Check" - PPR SIZE CHK = OFF
  • Wihin your printer driver configure the "Paper Suction" to -1

800M

It does not compare, but not for the reasons you might think. The Fastframe can only stretch up to a 41″ x 41″ frame. Each size requires a different platen…at a sizable cost. The machine is designed to be operated by (1) person to produce one piece at a time which means that you would need to have several machines operating to produce the 4000-6000 stretches some of our customers are producing a month. One of our customers stretches 4500 canvas a month with (3) machines and (5) people. The Fastframe sells for about $150,000 and the proprietary stretcher cartridges are very expensive. Finally, there is no provision to cut the excess canvas around the corners, with our machine this can be done in-place.

Allure Rag

Yes, they are extremely reliable. We chose to use pneumatic components specifically for their reliability and accessibility.

Brilliance Chromata White:  CANVAS MATTE

Elegance Velvet Platinum: TEXTURED WATERCOLOR PAPER

Optica One: WATERCOLOR PAPER

Almost every problem that can occur with Glamour II, can be solved by using more of it. If you are experiencing cracking, chances are you did not use enough of it. Therefore, make sure when spraying your prints, that you always use 2 heavy coats. Though Glamour II is temperature sensitive and is mildly susceptible to environmental conditions, your prints should never crack if you have applied enough Glamour II.  When applying Glamour II with a foam roller, you still should be able to get away with one coat, but make sure you apply the Glamour II generously.

The recommended water to varnish ratio is: 30% distilled water and 70% coating. It is very important that you distilled water, rather that tap or drinking water.  The minerals added to drinking water will effect the integrity of the coating. Before mixing the water into the varnish, heat up the water in the microwave. Heating up the distilled water will help improve the effect of the self level agents leaving your print with no roller streaks. It is always safe to have less water than coating.  A major problem with coating canvas is users over diluting the coating.

There are a couple different techniques that you can use to acquire a matte finish using our varnish. First off which would be to apply a thin coat of gloss varnish first. Please wait for it to become fully dry before taking the next step. After the print has dried, you can apply a heavy coat of matte over the first thin gloss base coat. This should give it a matte finish when it has completed drying.

Another method would be to mix the varnish together. Glamour II Gloss and Glamour II Matte are 100% compatible with each other. A good gloss-to-matte ratio would be 20% gloss - 80% matte.

This process may require some trial and error to find what ratio best suits your prints. However, 20% gloss and 80% matte seems to be a an average ratio for matte finishes.

Once you have found your desired ratio, it would be a good idea to invest in a graduated cylinder (the glass instrument use to measure fluids). This will make it very easy to maintain the exact same coating ratio for all of your prints.

Aqueous

If your prints are going magenta it could be a number of reasons: 

1. It could be a clogged head, in which case you should run a head cleaning on your printer. 
2. Double check that you are selecting "No Color Adjustment" if not the software will try to color correct the image. 
3. The file the image is in may have a magenta cast. 
4. Lastly you may have a profile that is not working for your printer. If this is the case please print the ICC targets you can download from our web site and send them to use. We can custom create a profile for you free of cost.

BC Australia

If you are selling fine art giclée prints your quality driven customers will demand using an acid-free pH-neutral archival inkjet fine art paper. Museums and fine artists with rigid standards will require this class of fine art paper. So if you are looking for a wide format media you can trust, Breathing Color fine art papers have become the most popular solution for fine art printmakers and publishers worldwide. For example, Breathing Color's Elegance Velvet Fine Art Paper, Elegance Textured Fine Art Paper, and Sterling 280g Smooth Fine Art Paper, are available in both sheets and rolls.

There are several good reasons to use the fine art papers available from Breathing Color. First and foremost, your business requires nothing less than the best quality paper available so that your customers are guaranteed to maximize potential color gamut and dmax. Second, by buying direct from a fine art paper manufacturer, you can eliminate middleman distributors and save money in the process.

Cheap papers are suitable for normal printing for pictures to share with friends and family, and also have their use for proofing pictures you intend to print for sale or display on more expensive materials.

Choosing a Surface of a Fine Art Inkjet Paper

You may not like the particular inkjet fine art paper surfaces that you have tried thus far, which could have been the papers you received with your Epson printer. Although the range provided by, for example Epson, is large enough to be confusing, the fine art papers included in it actually only cover a fairly small range of what is available. Using fine art papers from a "third party manufacturer" gives you a much wider choice, including many different smooth and textured inkjet papers and shinier gloss finishes as well as some unusual materials including some non-paper surfaces including fabric such as an inkjet printable silk as well as signage and inkjet banner products such as adhesive vinyl. All of these fine art inkjet papers are available at much more competitive prices and are, in many cases, superior in performance.

Choosing a Weight of a Fine Art Inkjet Paper

The traditional measurement of fine art paper thickness is given in grams per square meter (gsm). Normal typing paper is around 80 gsm, and typical inkjet fine art papers may range from 120-310 gsm. More expensive fine-art papers are usually on or over 300gsm, while the lesser expensive ones are on or below 210gsm. Heavier fine art papers can cause problems with the paper feed in some printers. Small-format models that have a significantly curved path for the paper through the machine are particularly unlikely to be able to use such heavyweight papers. However, despite what the printer manual says, usually double the maximum weight specified with some printers will print fine art without problems.

Archival Qualities of Inkjet Fine Art Paper

Three factors - paper, ink and paper coating - interact to determine print lifetimes, as well as the environmental factors including storage and display conditions. Good fine art papers are likely to lead to longer lifetimes, and as with most other media, this generally means acid-free materials.

Cheaper fine art paper generally will not last well, breaking down over time to give acidic materials that will attack the image. Acid-free papers usually perform better.

The best fine art papers are generally made from 100% cotton rag rather than wood pulp, and these tend to be expensive - at least a dollar for a sheet.

Inkjet Fine Art Paper Confusing Issues

There are actually relatively few manufacturers of high quality papers. The distributors sell many papers made by some manufacturers under different brand names, which makes for some confusion. Claims by some of these re-branders that they specify different coatings for the paper they sell often - if not always - appear to be untrue. The aim of this re-branding is to lock the user into using paper supplied by them, when the same material (but under a different name) may be available more cheaply elsewhere. Breathing Color does not participate in such a strategy and our customers appreciate the exlcusivity and uniqueness of our product line.

Glossy Inkjet Fine Art Papers

Gloss papers are generally made for non-archival use. They range from highly reflective plastic films to materials with a relatively low gloss, that are almost closer to a pearl or lustre finish.

Pigment printers seldom produce good results on gloss surfaces, often giving very slow drying and patchy results.

We recommend using standard razor blade to cut the canvas off of the roll.  This will help preserve your printers' internal cutting blade and will help keep your printer free of loose debris. 

Brilliance Chromata White Canvas

No, however, it does make for a cleaner more refined look. Take a look at the video demonstration on the "details" tab.

Yes, they are extremely reliable. We chose to use pneumatic components specifically for their reliability and accessibility.

Approximately 15-20 psi. for light canvas and about 30-40 psi for very heavy canvas.

Yes. The operator should be familiar with the canvas medium and should always start a stretch using no more than 15-20 psi and increase it slowly.

Cleaning fine art prints that are coated with our Timeless or Glamour 2 varnish is quite easy. Simply use a damp cloth to gently wipe the surface of the coated print to remove dust or dirt. Read more about cleaning your coated fine art prints here on our blog, The Art of Printmaking.

There are a few different things that can cause banding. Most commonly, you will see banding occur when there is a clogged nozzle or something else hardware related. Please follow the steps below to help identify the issue:

  1. Ensure that your printer can handle the thickness of the media you are attempting to print on. In your printer's user manual, or by calling the manufacture, you can find the maximum weight that your printer will accept; make sure that the media doesn't exceed this maximum specification.
  2. See our blog about doing a nozzle check and other maintainance on your printer.
  3. If the nozzle check results look fine, proceed to check your platen gap settings and making sure other print settings are correct.

While we do not offer any free, small sample strips of paper, we do offer trial rolls (which measure 17 x 20) at our cost for many of our canvas, fine art, and photo papers. These trial rolls can be found and purchased at the bottom of any product page. We also carry the Breathing Color Sample Pack which includes two unprinted letter-sized sheets of six of our most popular fine art papers. We offer samples this way to allow everyone to fully test and evaluate their own prints on Breathing Color media.

Be sure that you have used the correct print settings/profile for your printer and canvas. If the wrong media type is used you could potentially print with too much ink. If there is excess ink this will only dry on the surface and when coating with a foam roller, the excess ink will be agitated and come out on the roller (and your print).

If you have insured the proper print settings were used, make sure you allowed enough time for the print to dry. Ink can come up when the roller has changed directions since it’s an abrasive move, which causes more friction. With Timeless, this is especially important since it requires pressure to apply. Always apply coating in straight lines as this will not damage the print at all. Read more about ink lifting from your print onto your roller on our blog post here.

Epson 7800 / 9800/4800 Ink K3 Cyan 220ml Overview

Epson UltraChrome K3™ ink, used on the Epson 9800, Epson 7800, Epson 4800, can produce archival prints with amazing color fidelity, gloss level, and scratch resistance, while providing consistently stable colors that significantly outperform lesser ink technologies. This breakthrough ink technology also makes it the perfect choice for professional neutral and toned black and white prints with higher density levels and virtually no metamerism. Epson ink. Its value is apparent each time you print. What you save in dollars with third party (or “compatible”) ink cartridges, you could sacrifice in quality and performance. In independent testing, Epson ink cartridges produce superior image quality, longer print life, greater reliability and unbeatable value versus third party ink cartridges. But don’t take our word for it. Industry experts and independent research prove not only that “you get what you pay for,” but with genuine Epson ink cartridges, you get substantially more. Superior Image Quality For prints as vivid as your memories. Epson ink cartridges are engineered to deliver stable, long-lasting, photographic quality. A recent PC World magazine article said, "We encountered third-party inks that produced poor quality prints." The article showed that none of the third party ink cartridges tested were able to deliver the consistent quality of Epson ink cartridges for photo printing. Longer Print Life For brilliant prints that last and last. Permanence, or how long a displayed print will last before noticeable fading, is where third party ink cartridges really pale in comparison to Epson ink cartridges. In a recent study, Henry Wilhelm, a leading authority on photo longevity, projected Epson inks to last for up to 92 years*, while third party inks printed on the same paper were projected to last no more than a year. Greater Reliability Because we value your time as much as you do. Epson ink cartridges deliver reliable and optimal print performance because they are designed to work with Epson printers. All ink jet printers use user-initiated cleaning cycles to clear any printhead clogs that may occur. With Epson printers, third party inks can clog the printhead nozzles more frequently, leading to more cleaning cycles. According to a study conducted by Torrey Pines Research, Epson ink cartridges require up to 25 times fewer user-initiated cleaning cycles than third party ink cartridges.* That adds up to considerable savings in time. Unbeatable Value More prints per cartridge. Torrey Pines Research stated that Epson ink cartridges "consistently outperformed third party ink brands" when it comes to the number of prints per cartridge. In fact, the study showed that the Epson ink cartridges produce up to 114 more pages per black ink cartridge and 19 more pages per color cartridge.* The number of pages printed using Epson ink cartridges is up to 30% more than the third party ink cartridges. Bottom line - more prints, more value. *Torrey Pines Research, test of Epson genuine ink vs. third party ink

In your "Printer Preferences," make sure the platen gap is set to Also, you want to make sure on your printer, the controls on the printer itself, that the platen gap is set to WIDE.

The Canon imagePROGRAF iPF8000, 44" inch printer takes the next step in redefining large format printing. The new iPF8000 is the ideal solution for any color professional looking for impressive, full-bleed color output, strength in paper handling and exceptional speed in output. Advanced professional features such as automatic clogged nozzle detection and compensation for reliability, 330ml and 700ml selectable ink capacity sizes for versatility, a large backlit LCD panel for ease of use, and ink usage tracking for accountability are all part of the new iPF8000 to satisfy every color professional's large format printing needs. The 12-color pigment ink system with LUCIA inks was designed to expand the spectrum of color for environments from professional photographers to graphic designers to print for pays. The 12-ink colors enable the iPF8000 printer to deliver outstanding color and neutral and stable grayscales. The Canon L-COA processor, which is dedicated to the imagePROGRAF, is designed to optimize the best quality output at the highest possible speeds. Vivid breathtaking, long lasting prints are achieved by combining Canon's advanced technological achievements.

The many built in features that make this printer easy to use and maintain, are the driving force behind this powerful printer. With the printer's unique ability to print in unprecedented quality and speed along with the multiple media handling options and software suite, make the iPF8000 the ideal solution for all types of professionals. The iPF8000 is designed for reliability, simplicity, productivity and above all quality.

  • 12-Color Pigment Ink System - New LUCIA inks expand the range of color reproduction by providing a wide color gamut.
  • Automatic Switching Between Black Inks - Utilizes automatic switching between Regular Black and Matte Black Ink, helping to eliminate wasted ink and time of swapping out ink tanks.
  • New Print Head System - Dual print head system with a total of 30,720 nozzles.
  • Borderless Printing - 4-sided edge to edge printing, only with roll media.
  • Non-firing Detection and Compensation Function - When clogged or non-firing nozzles are detected; print head cleaning cycle is automatically executed. If the nozzle remains obstructed, the iPF8000 will automatically compensate by rerouting the ink to functioning nozzles.

Glamour II Veneer is a practically odorless water-based coating that can be applied in a closed room. It is NOT a solvent-based coating which in contrast are extremely hazardous and emit very strong odors. If you are more sensitive to chemicals and odors, or are generally concerned with health, then we would always recommend using a mask when applying any coating from any manufactuer -- just to be on the safe side.

The printable side of our Elegance Velvet Fine Art Paper is the slightly smoother, less textured side of the paper. This is the side that has the ink jet receptive coating on it.

First make sure your Platen Gap is set to WIDER. If that doesn't help, you'll want to turn up the Paper Suction which is found in your Epson driver under "Paper Configuration."  Turning up the suction will hold the paper firmly to the bottom of the printer and stop rubbing.

It is definitely possible to use our Brilliance Chromata White Canvas with Mimaki printers. However, the main question is what temperature are you transferring your ink at. Brilliance Chromata White is a cotton/poly blend, so you want to check the temperature that you will be transferring at and minimize the heat if possible. The heat on some dye sublimations may warp the polyester raw material. Brilliance Chromata White Canvas like other Breathing Color Inkjet Media are designed specifically for pigment based inkjet printers, but we have had numerous customers use our media on other types of printers including a series of Mimakis. But to suggest the normal type of canvas used when printing with dye sublimation, you should use a 100% cotton canvas.

Nonetheless, the best option is always to test the canvas for yourself. We make this very easy and inexpensive to do through our heavily discounted "trial rolls" which can be quickly purchased right on our website, by clicking here http://www.breathingcolor.com/bc/catalog/index.php?cPath=303. A 17"x20' trial roll of this canvas is inexpensive and its precisely how all of our customers evaluate this canvas.

Once the print has completely dried, you should have no problem rolling it up.  Keep in mind that when the print is exposed to extremely hot or humid temperatures, it may have a tendency to soften and stick to itself.  For this reason it is always recommended to protect each print with a sheet of an acid-free barrier paper.

Brilliance Glossy for Solvent

Yes, they are extremely reliable. We chose to use pneumatic components specifically for their reliability and accessibility.

Epson 7800 / 9800/4800 Ink K3 Cyan 220ml Overview

Epson UltraChrome K3™ ink, used on the Epson 9800, Epson 7800, Epson 4800, can produce archival prints with amazing color fidelity, gloss level, and scratch resistance, while providing consistently stable colors that significantly outperform lesser ink technologies. This breakthrough ink technology also makes it the perfect choice for professional neutral and toned black and white prints with higher density levels and virtually no metamerism. Epson ink. Its value is apparent each time you print. What you save in dollars with third party (or “compatible”) ink cartridges, you could sacrifice in quality and performance. In independent testing, Epson ink cartridges produce superior image quality, longer print life, greater reliability and unbeatable value versus third party ink cartridges. But don’t take our word for it. Industry experts and independent research prove not only that “you get what you pay for,” but with genuine Epson ink cartridges, you get substantially more. Superior Image Quality For prints as vivid as your memories. Epson ink cartridges are engineered to deliver stable, long-lasting, photographic quality. A recent PC World magazine article said, "We encountered third-party inks that produced poor quality prints." The article showed that none of the third party ink cartridges tested were able to deliver the consistent quality of Epson ink cartridges for photo printing. Longer Print Life For brilliant prints that last and last. Permanence, or how long a displayed print will last before noticeable fading, is where third party ink cartridges really pale in comparison to Epson ink cartridges. In a recent study, Henry Wilhelm, a leading authority on photo longevity, projected Epson inks to last for up to 92 years*, while third party inks printed on the same paper were projected to last no more than a year. Greater Reliability Because we value your time as much as you do. Epson ink cartridges deliver reliable and optimal print performance because they are designed to work with Epson printers. All ink jet printers use user-initiated cleaning cycles to clear any printhead clogs that may occur. With Epson printers, third party inks can clog the printhead nozzles more frequently, leading to more cleaning cycles. According to a study conducted by Torrey Pines Research, Epson ink cartridges require up to 25 times fewer user-initiated cleaning cycles than third party ink cartridges.* That adds up to considerable savings in time. Unbeatable Value More prints per cartridge. Torrey Pines Research stated that Epson ink cartridges "consistently outperformed third party ink brands" when it comes to the number of prints per cartridge. In fact, the study showed that the Epson ink cartridges produce up to 114 more pages per black ink cartridge and 19 more pages per color cartridge.* The number of pages printed using Epson ink cartridges is up to 30% more than the third party ink cartridges. Bottom line - more prints, more value. *Torrey Pines Research, test of Epson genuine ink vs. third party ink

Canon Printers

A. 90 psi @ 2CFM or greater.  This can easily be obtained with a typical “pancake” compressor that can be purchased at Home Depot or Lowes. Here is a link to just a few. <click here>

Yes, they are extremely reliable. We chose to use pneumatic components specifically for their reliability and accessibility.

No! One of the most compelling aspects of Crystalline is its ease of use.  Since they require no varnish, Crystalline prints are immediately ready to stretch or mount.

Canon has set a new standard in the way digital prints are produced with the all-new next generation pigment ink imagePROGRAF iPF5000 17" printer. The iPF5000 printer is designed to satisfy the most critical printing needs of all types of digital artists. This extraordinary printer ties in the new LUCIA pigment ink with innovative hardware to produce brilliant eye-catching output that's ready in minutes. The 12 color pigment ink system provides superior color stability and print longevity while dramatically expanding the color gamut. With the combination of the two gray and two black inks, the iPF5000 produces crisp, neutral monochrome output. The new L-COA print controller intelligently processes print data and directs the two high-precision, high-density (30,720 nozzles) print heads to lay down ink with unprecedented speed and accuracy.

Along with the printer's unique ability to print in unprecedented quality and speed is the multiple media handling options and software suite, which make the iPF5000 the ideal solution for all types of professionals. Stunning quality prints can be created right out-of-the-box, with software that is just as innovative as the printer itself, such as PosterArtist, Digital Photo Print Pro, Print Plug-in for Digital Photo Professional and Print Plug-in for Adobe® Photoshop®.

Features:

  • 12 Color Pigment Ink System - New LUCIA inks expand the range of color reproduction by providing a wide color gamut.
  • Automatic Switching Between Black Inks - utilizes automatic switching between Regular Black and Matte Black Ink, eliminating wasted ink and time of swapping out ink tanks.
  • New Print Head System - dual print head system with a total of 30,720 nozzles.
  • Multiple Media Options - standard media cassette tray, a rear manual feed, a front straight path manual feed and an optional roll feed unit for printing long length output.
  • Borderless Printing - 4 sided edge to edge printing, only with roll media.
  • Non-firing Detection and Compensation Function - when clogged or non-firing nozzles are detected; print head cleaning cycle is automatically executed. If the nozzle remains obstructed, the iPF5000 will automatically compensate by rerouting the ink to functioning nozzles.

If your prints are going magenta it could be a number of reasons: 

1. It could be a clogged head, in which case you should run a head cleaning on your printer. 
2. Double check that you are selecting "No Color Adjustment" if not the software will try to color correct the image. 
3. The file the image is in may have a magenta cast. 
4. Lastly you may have a profile that is not working for your printer. If this is the case please print the ICC targets you can download from our web site and send them to use. We can custom create a profile for you free of cost.

Many of our customers that use a smaller width printers have cut down the width of our rolls with using a band saw to cut the whole roll down to size. Also, some of customers prefer just to cut the roll into sheets, and then print. None of these methods will alter the integrity of the media.

All of the fine art paper and inkjet canvas made by Breathing Color is specifically designed for Epson's Ultrachrome and K3 Inks. Every Epson printer size is also supported with compatible product sizes such as 13", 17", 24", 36" and 44" width rolls. In addition, each product has a custom profile for all Epson printers to ensure color accuracy and ease of use.

In addition to industry-leading inkjet canvas and inkjet papers, Breathing Color also manufactures high-end graphics and signage material known as the Picturesque Collection. Among this collection is our Repositionable Adhesive Vinyl which is well suited for stickers, posters, and decals, due to its easily removable adhesive backing and its outdoor durability. 17" Trial Rolls of Repositionable Adhesive Vinyl are available for testing.

Another very popular alternative to inkjet canvas and fine art paper is our Pure Silk. Exactly like it sounds, this product is 100% Pure Silk, which can be printed directly onto using a pigment-based inkjet printer. It comes on a roll with a rigid removable backing. Our Pure Silk is water-resistant and should be handled just like any other silk. In other words, do not machine wash it, but dry cleaning is acceptable. 17" Trial Rolls of Pure Silk are available for testing.

Chromata White

We consider the Art Peel a product designed for "short term" display. A couple of years maximum, with ideal conditions. It's a fabric so will suffer the normal wear and tear on the wall unless it's laminated. Lamination will usually help with dust, moisture, and UV exposure just like any other media. 

It does not compare, but not for the reasons you might think. The Fastframe can only stretch up to a 41″ x 41″ frame. Each size requires a different platen…at a sizable cost. The machine is designed to be operated by (1) person to produce one piece at a time which means that you would need to have several machines operating to produce the 4000-6000 stretches some of our customers are producing a month. One of our customers stretches 4500 canvas a month with (3) machines and (5) people. The Fastframe sells for about $150,000 and the proprietary stretcher cartridges are very expensive. Finally, there is no provision to cut the excess canvas around the corners, with our machine this can be done in-place.

Brilliance Chromata White: CANVAS MATTE

Elegance Velvet Platinum: TEXTURED WATERCOLOR PAPER

Optica One: WATERCOLOR PAPER

Breathing Color uses 3 different shipping methods for our customers in Hawaii. We can send your products UPS, FEDEX, or DHX. To get the cheapest shipping rate you would go with DHX which has the ability to use ocean freight. It is the cheapest but will take the most time to get to you. If you know what you want to order ahead of time, it is a good idea to place your order 3-4 weeks in advance to keep your shipping rates low as possible by going DHX ocean freight.

To receive additional information about products or shipping methods please call us on our toll free number 1-866-72-COLOR and speak with a Breathing Color Media Specialist.

Hopefully you have already watched our instructional video on "How to Apply Glamour II Veneer" which provides a very detailed look at how to apply Glamour II Veneer properly.

If you still have streaks, there are a few things you need to focus on:

(1) How much are you diluting with water? Try adding more water (at least 40%).
(2) Before adding the water to the coating, heat it in the microwave for about 8 to 10 seconds depending on how much water you are adding. The water should be above luke warm but not boiling. The heated water will help in mixing with Glamour II Veneer.
(3) When stirring the heated water and Glamour II Veneer together, stir lightly and slowly. If you try to mix them together too fast or too aggressively, it can create air bubbles that are difficult to get out of the coating once it is applied to the print. Once dried, these air bubbles are even more visible and can ruin your print.
(4) When you are first applying Glamour II Veneer to your inkjet canvas or fine art paper, be very generous with the application. Some of our customers even find success in pouring the coating directly onto the print in even lines across the whole print. Once this is done, the foam roller is then just used to spread the Glamour II Veneer around evenly.
(5) If you decide to apply Glamour II Veneer without pouring it straight onto the inkjet canvas or fine art paper and instead apply it with the foam roller directly, make sure to stay away from any bumby parts of the tray with the foam roller. When you are moving the roller around in the tray to saturate it with Glamour II Veneer, the bumbs can cause indentations in the foam which will transfer over to your prints and ultimately leave some service uncovered.
(6) Try to go over the print with the foam roller the least amount of times possible. We have found that the more times you run your foam roller over the Glamour II Veneer, the more coating you are actually taking off of the print. If you still see lines in the coating, wait until it dries to see if they go away. If you have been generous enough with the coating, the leveling agents in the Glamour II Veneer will cause the streaks to go away as it is drying.
(7) Apply the least amount of pressure possible when going over your inkjet canvas or fine art paper with the Glamour II Veneer. Pressure will cause indentations in the coating which will cause streaks once it has dried.
*this article will help if you have streaks, streaking, or lines when trying to apply Glamour II

Heat lamps are not suggested for drying Glamour II Veneer. In fact, cold air is the best way to dry Glamour II Veneer but be careful if you are considering a fan not to blow dust or debris onto a wet print.

We do not recommend an air pressure setting as not all guns, air compressors, nozzles, etc. are the same. Therefore it is recommended that customers using an HVLP gun to coat with Glamour II Veneer test several different pressure settings and coating techniques to determine the best solution for each unique setup is.

Glamour II Veneer giclee coating can be rolled on with a dense foam roller, sprayed on with an HVLP gun (50% dilution), or used with a roll coating machine (50% dilution).

When rolling Glamour II Veneer you are going to want to dilute it down 25%-30% with warm distilled water.  You can apply the glamour directly to the print, and then immediately start to roll the Glamour II onto the canvas.  Do not apply pressure to the roller, and make multiple passes in opposite directions.  A good way to know if you are almost done rolling, is to listen for the "sticky" sound of the Glamour II.  This means that the coating has been worked into the canvas and is starting to dry.  The more time you spend working the Glamour II into the canvas, the faster it will dry and the better your print will look.  Please allow at least a full 24 hours for your print to dry.

Glamour II Veneer giclee coating has been known to work with various artist paints for embellishment, however it is always recommended that you perform a test with a small scrap of coated canvas to avoid a negative reaction.

Coating

A. No, but we recommend using a long-nose staple gun for access.  We currently sell (2) different models of long-nose staple guns, the Fasco F1B8016LN and the Omer 8016LN.

We designed this machine for that very purpose, however, it is also capable of producing regular stretches.

That's no problem! There are no height limitations when using the Gallery Stretcher.

Managing your own color is hands down the best way to acheive predictable color on an ongoing basis. The ColorMunki is an easy-to-use, all-inclusive device that is best suited for the novice user or the user running one printer at a time. Read much more about the ColorMunki and color management here on our blog, The Art of Printmaking.

No, the tool will allow you to stretch any canvas regardless of size. It also works equally well for any type of stretcher bar. All that is required is to adjust your canvas size to the proper dimension for using the tool.

Be sure that you have used the correct print settings/profile for your printer and canvas. If the wrong media type is used you could potentially print with too much ink. If there is excess ink this will only dry on the surface and when coating with a foam roller, the excess ink will be agitated and come out on the roller (and your print).

If you have insured the proper print settings were used, make sure you allowed enough time for the print to dry. Ink can come up when the roller has changed directions since it’s an abrasive move, which causes more friction. With Timeless, this is especially important since it requires pressure to apply. Always apply coating in straight lines as this will not damage the print at all. Read more about ink lifting from your print onto your roller on our blog post here.

Breathing Color's E-Store is the easiest and fastest way to order Breathing Color Media. When purchasing through our E-Store, you will also save the most amount of money. We periodically have promotions on top of our everyday low pricing combinations, such as our Trial Kits, 3 and 10 Hot Items pricing, and Power Buyers pricing. However if you ever have any problems purchasing online, it may be due to a few different factors:

(1) Your password is not being recognized. In certain instances, passwords may be forgotten, reset, or simply mistaken for another. In this case, simply click on "Password forgotten" in the customer login page. Enter your e-mail address and click continue. In less than 5-10 minutes, your new password will be sent to your e-mail address. NOTE: If you do not remember the e-mail address that you signed up with, you may have to sign in as a new customer.
(2) Your credit card is not processing. We currently only accept a few major credit cards. We accept any credit card or debit card that has the official Visa, Mastercard, or American Express logo shown on the card. If you do not wish to use your credit card or do not have an accepted credit card, please consider using our PayPal purchasing and charging system.
(3) There are no "BUY" buttons visible. Whenever you do not see a "BUY"
button next to a specific product, that product is either out of stock or has not been released. Breathing Color is constantly introducing new, innovative products to our line, which are immediately added to our website. On occasion, we will only release a couple sizes of a specific product during the first production run. This is normal for all new releases. Typically, other sizes will follow shortly, and when products and sizes are newly released or restocked, the "BUY" buttons will once again become active. This is a good way to keep track of product availability as our website is updated daily.

If none of these factors apply to you, and you are still experiencing difficulties, please contact a Breathing Color Media Specialist.

Company Announcements

A. No, but we recommend using a long-nose staple gun for access.  We currently sell (2) different models of long-nose staple guns, the Fasco F1B8016LN and the Omer 8016LN.

Once the print has completely dried, you should have no problem rolling it up.  Keep in mind that when the print is exposed to extremely hot or humid temperatures, it may have a tendency to soften and stick to itself.  For this reason it is always recommended to protect each print with a sheet of an acid-free barrier paper.

Crystalline Gloss

It does not compare, but not for the reasons you might think. The Fastframe can only stretch up to a 41″ x 41″ frame. Each size requires a different platen…at a sizable cost. The machine is designed to be operated by (1) person to produce one piece at a time which means that you would need to have several machines operating to produce the 4000-6000 stretches some of our customers are producing a month. One of our customers stretches 4500 canvas a month with (3) machines and (5) people. The Fastframe sells for about $150,000 and the proprietary stretcher cartridges are very expensive. Finally, there is no provision to cut the excess canvas around the corners, with our machine this can be done in-place.

Elegance Velvet

Yes, they are extremely reliable. We chose to use pneumatic components specifically for their reliability and accessibility.

Both Timeless and Glamour 2 have their place in the coating world. Timeless does not need to be diluted and dries very quickly, where Glamour 2 has a slower dry time and contains helpful leveling agents. Read our blog post here for more information on which Breathing Color print varnish would be best for you.

A great method is the front load, but the head isn't "focused" if you use this method. To fix this you are going to need to make the media "thicker." The canvas we carry is 21 mils thick, so we need twice than and then some. We have found that we also need something stiff to support the canvas. A great solution is to load the sheet of canvas along with the a piece of cardboard 13" wide on the bottom of the stack of sheets.  Your goal is to get to 47 mils, which is more than double the thickness of a single sheet of Brilliance Chromata White.  We recommend using the cardboard as a form of support on the bottom, along with 3-4 sheets. 

The printable side of our Elegance Velvet Fine Art Paper is the slightly smoother, less textured side of the paper. This is the side that has the ink jet receptive coating on it.

Once the print has completely dried, you should have no problem rolling it up.  Keep in mind that when the print is exposed to extremely hot or humid temperatures, it may have a tendency to soften and stick to itself.  For this reason it is always recommended to protect each print with a sheet of an acid-free barrier paper.

Breathing Color sends out emails to all customers in our database for Promotional Sales.  These item(s) will vary in discount, availability and some may have a maximum quantity allowed to order per customer.

Breathing Color Sales representatives do not know which products will be offered as a special until the day of the sale.  Breathing Color has a strict policy on when we close our promotional sales.  Please refer back to the promotional email which will tell you when the current sale expires.  Breathing Color sales representatives do not have the power to offer promotional discounts for orders that were placed prior to the promotional email.

We understand that some customers may feel that they had “bad timing” and ordered a product in promotion prior to the promotion being announced – in some cases, the day before the promotion. The fact is, hundreds of customers order Breathing Color products every day and many customers experience this.  If they didn’t purchase the product the day before the promo, it might have been 2 days, 3 days, or even two weeks prior to the promo. Every customer is going to react differently in regards to the amount of time elapsed since their last order of that particular product on promotion, but the reality is No customer is at a disadvantage any more than any other customer.  The only thing Breathing Color can do is what we do – treat everyone fairly and offer the same opportunities to everyone.  Therefore, if you feel that our current promotion is a valuable promotion, then we encourage you to take advantage of it just like everybody else regardless of whether you just made a purchase or not.

The only way to really lose on any promotion is to not take advantage of it at all.

Elegance Velvet

That's no problem! There are no height limitations when using the Gallery Stretcher.

Epson 7800 / 9800/4800 Ink K3 Cyan 220ml Overview

Epson UltraChrome K3™ ink, used on the Epson 9800, Epson 7800, Epson 4800, can produce archival prints with amazing color fidelity, gloss level, and scratch resistance, while providing consistently stable colors that significantly outperform lesser ink technologies. This breakthrough ink technology also makes it the perfect choice for professional neutral and toned black and white prints with higher density levels and virtually no metamerism. Epson ink. Its value is apparent each time you print. What you save in dollars with third party (or “compatible”) ink cartridges, you could sacrifice in quality and performance. In independent testing, Epson ink cartridges produce superior image quality, longer print life, greater reliability and unbeatable value versus third party ink cartridges. But don’t take our word for it. Industry experts and independent research prove not only that “you get what you pay for,” but with genuine Epson ink cartridges, you get substantially more. Superior Image Quality For prints as vivid as your memories. Epson ink cartridges are engineered to deliver stable, long-lasting, photographic quality. A recent PC World magazine article said, "We encountered third-party inks that produced poor quality prints." The article showed that none of the third party ink cartridges tested were able to deliver the consistent quality of Epson ink cartridges for photo printing. Longer Print Life For brilliant prints that last and last. Permanence, or how long a displayed print will last before noticeable fading, is where third party ink cartridges really pale in comparison to Epson ink cartridges. In a recent study, Henry Wilhelm, a leading authority on photo longevity, projected Epson inks to last for up to 92 years*, while third party inks printed on the same paper were projected to last no more than a year. Greater Reliability Because we value your time as much as you do. Epson ink cartridges deliver reliable and optimal print performance because they are designed to work with Epson printers. All ink jet printers use user-initiated cleaning cycles to clear any printhead clogs that may occur. With Epson printers, third party inks can clog the printhead nozzles more frequently, leading to more cleaning cycles. According to a study conducted by Torrey Pines Research, Epson ink cartridges require up to 25 times fewer user-initiated cleaning cycles than third party ink cartridges.* That adds up to considerable savings in time. Unbeatable Value More prints per cartridge. Torrey Pines Research stated that Epson ink cartridges "consistently outperformed third party ink brands" when it comes to the number of prints per cartridge. In fact, the study showed that the Epson ink cartridges produce up to 114 more pages per black ink cartridge and 19 more pages per color cartridge.* The number of pages printed using Epson ink cartridges is up to 30% more than the third party ink cartridges. Bottom line - more prints, more value. *Torrey Pines Research, test of Epson genuine ink vs. third party ink

For borderless printing, the Epson print engine enlarges the image size slightly (about 5 percent or a bit less) to ensure that the image is not printed with any white edges due to paper misalignment. You can minimize the clipping by resizing your image to actual paper size (e.g., 13" x 19", 4" x 6"), and then setting Print with Preview to center the image and print it at 96% of actual size. The clipping dialog still comes up (it will whenever you are printing in the printer's defined margins), but tell it OK. You can try using 95% if there is still too much clipping.

In this Article we will take a closer look at the Epson 11880 Vivid Magenta Inkset. These are brand new ink cartridges designed for these new Epson Stylus Pro Series printers only. It is first important to note that these vivid magenta inkset cartridges are NOT compatible with older printer models such as the Epson Stylus Pro 9800 and Epson Stylus Pro 7800 . Although they will work, they are reported to ruin the print heads within a short period of time such as 6 months. Althought this information has not been confirmed by a third party Epson user as of the date of this writing, it should be noted. Also note that we are only referring to the two vivid magenta cartirdges; not the other colors which can be used interchangeably with other Epson Stylus Pro Series printer models.

Epson UltraChrome/K3 Ink Technology with Vivid Magenta * High-density pigments for an extremely wide color gamut * New formulation of Magenta pigments for extreme blues and purples * Professional print permanence ratings for truly sellable quality prints * High-gloss Microcrystal Encapsulation technology for reduced gloss differential * Superior scratch resistance from improved pigment and resin chemistry * Color is stable immediately after printing - no short-term color shifting * Produces a black density up to 2.55 with an L* value of 2.9*

Like the older prints by Epson such as the Epson Stylus Pro 9800 and Epson Stylus Pro 7800, these new printers - the Epson 11880, Epson 9880, and Epson 7880 printers have 8-channel printheads. However, these new inkjet printers incorporate the new MicoPiezo AMC Printhead technology. These new heads are quite remarkable in that they have a new ink repelling coating technology which reduces head clogging and by simplifying the need for cleaning these new printheads are especially useful for dusty or linty papers, such as fine art papers or canvas. The printheads also offer more advanced Active Meniscus Control (AMC). Active Meniscus Control is intended to significantly improve dot regularity and dot placement. Although Active Meniscus Control technology was used in prior printer models (this is the third generation), the performance in the Epson 11880 is reported to be stunningly more than 100 times as accurate when compared to a model such as the Epson 9800.

In your "Printer Preferences," make sure the platen gap is set to Also, you want to make sure on your printer, the controls on the printer itself, that the platen gap is set to WIDE.

If you hare having problems printing Brilliance Chromata White with either the Epson 7600 or 9600 reguarding the "Reload Paper" dialog, there are settings that may need to be changed to fix this problem.

  • If you have the Platen Gap set to WIDEST change it to WIDE.
  • Edit the setting on the printer to turn off "Paper Size Check" - PPR SIZE CHK = OFF
  • Wihin your printer driver configure the "Paper Suction" to -1

Epson 11880

No. Both canvas finishes perform the same in terms of color output, density, gamut, and saturation. The only difference is the sheen of the canvas which does not affect the color output on Crystalline.

The best way to prevent the canvas from lifting is to understand what causes this to happen. Archival glue is essential to the EasyWrappe process because it provides a permanent bond with the canvas to the stretcher bars. Since all the tension of the canvas is on the edge of the stretcher bars themselves, it's important to let the glue dry to insure a permanent bond. The adhesive strips are for alignment purposes in the beginning stages of assembly, and later to hold the edge of the canvas to the bar. There is no tension at this point and only tension will cause the canvas to lift.

The best way is to profile Crystalline with a glossy paper setting, and use the Gloss enhancer on economy mode. This will cover the black ink, which is most susceptible to scuffing.

Epson 11880

A 44" printer can produce a gallery wrap as wide as 40" for EW PRO and 41" for EW 1.25". Keep in mind that this can only be accomplished if the customer uses Borderless Printing. If they don’t have a borderless printing option on their printer (or borderless printing is not allowed on the size they are trying to achieve), then I would subtract an additional inch from the above sizes. So 39" for EW Pro and 40" for EW 1.25".

Epson 4800

Add 1 ½" on all 4 sides (3" total) for EW 1.25", and add 2" on all 4 sides (4" total) for EW Pro. The additional ¼" on each side is for bleed that will be trimmed off. The above example would be printed at 19" x 23" for EW 1.25", and 20" x 24" for EW Pro. 

These issues are typically caused by too much coating. Since canvas needs to absorb coating eventy, too much coating creates air pockets in the canvas. When the air tries to escape, it pushes itself out either partially (air bubbles) or completely (pinholes). If you notice these issues while the print is still wet, simply go over these areas with your roller with light pressure (Timeless) or no pressure (Glamour II). If you are spraying with an HVLP gun, try going over the print with a light 2nd coat as this usually fills in the pinholes and breaks the air bubbles. This must be done while the print is wet.

Timeless needs to be applied with pressure, but reducing the amount of pressure when you finish coating is important. If you notice roller marks while the print is still wet, simply go over them with  firm pressure and reduce the pressure with each roll movement. After a few seconds, each roller mark should disappear.

If you have any flakes or chunks of coating in your container, the easiest way to remove them is through a strainer. Just fill your measuring cup with the amount needed, and pour through a strainer into another cup (or container). The strainer will catch everything solid and you can just throw it out. Don’t have a strainer? Use a coffee filter. Just grab a large cup or container and tape a coffee filter to the rim. Then, slowly pour your coating into the filter. A coffee filter takes time for liquid to pass through it, so pour a little at a time. This is a good trick because it will pick up anything that isn’t pure liquid, and the end result is a perfect mix of coating. Read more on our blog post.

Lyve Canvas can be considered the "next generation" of our world-renowned Chromata White Canvas.  In 2005 Chromata White was released as a groundbreaking matte canvas exhibiting unrivaled print quality, archival rating, and consistency, all of which still hold true today.  Over the past several years the Breathing Color team of scientists have been diligently working to develop a new IRC (Inkjet Receptive Coating) that would represent the next evolutionary step forward in print quality and archival technologies of inkjet canvas.  

While Chromata White Canvas is still considered a prominent industry-leader, Lyve Canvas exhibits a noticabley wider color gamut, greater DMax value, and sharper detail, making it a clear choice for the discerning printmaker.  Lyve Canvas is the most recent example of our ongoing commitment to positively contribute the world of photography and fine art, through excellence in print quality and print permanence.

We do have many customers using the Canon i9900 and the Epson R1800 and having success with 13" x 19" sheets of Brilliance Chromata White Canvas. Both printers work well but both printers have a hard time feeding inkjet canvas. If you are planning on printing a lot of canvas, we recommend the Epson 4800. Although the 4800 is significantly more expensive, it will not give you any problems with printing while the R1800 and i9900 might.

All of the fine art paper and inkjet canvas made by Breathing Color is specifically designed for Epson's Ultrachrome and K3 Inks. Every Epson printer size is also supported with compatible product sizes such as 13", 17", 24", 36" and 44" width rolls. In addition, each product has a custom profile for all Epson printers to ensure color accuracy and ease of use.

In addition to industry-leading inkjet canvas and inkjet papers, Breathing Color also manufactures high-end graphics and signage material known as the Picturesque Collection. Among this collection is our Repositionable Adhesive Vinyl which is well suited for stickers, posters, and decals, due to its easily removable adhesive backing and its outdoor durability. 17" Trial Rolls of Repositionable Adhesive Vinyl are available for testing.

Another very popular alternative to inkjet canvas and fine art paper is our Pure Silk. Exactly like it sounds, this product is 100% Pure Silk, which can be printed directly onto using a pigment-based inkjet printer. It comes on a roll with a rigid removable backing. Our Pure Silk is water-resistant and should be handled just like any other silk. In other words, do not machine wash it, but dry cleaning is acceptable. 17" Trial Rolls of Pure Silk are available for testing.

Epson 7800

Add 1 ½" on all 4 sides (3" total) for EW 1.25", and add 2" on all 4 sides (4" total) for EW Pro. The additional ¼" on each side is for bleed that will be trimmed off. The above example would be printed at 19" x 23" for EW 1.25", and 20" x 24" for EW Pro. 

These issues are typically caused by too much coating. Since canvas needs to absorb coating eventy, too much coating creates air pockets in the canvas. When the air tries to escape, it pushes itself out either partially (air bubbles) or completely (pinholes). If you notice these issues while the print is still wet, simply go over these areas with your roller with light pressure (Timeless) or no pressure (Glamour II). If you are spraying with an HVLP gun, try going over the print with a light 2nd coat as this usually fills in the pinholes and breaks the air bubbles. This must be done while the print is wet.

Timeless needs to be applied with pressure, but reducing the amount of pressure when you finish coating is important. If you notice roller marks while the print is still wet, simply go over them with  firm pressure and reduce the pressure with each roll movement. After a few seconds, each roller mark should disappear.

If you have any flakes or chunks of coating in your container, the easiest way to remove them is through a strainer. Just fill your measuring cup with the amount needed, and pour through a strainer into another cup (or container). The strainer will catch everything solid and you can just throw it out. Don’t have a strainer? Use a coffee filter. Just grab a large cup or container and tape a coffee filter to the rim. Then, slowly pour your coating into the filter. A coffee filter takes time for liquid to pass through it, so pour a little at a time. This is a good trick because it will pick up anything that isn’t pure liquid, and the end result is a perfect mix of coating. Read more on our blog post.

Lyve Canvas can be considered the "next generation" of our world-renowned Chromata White Canvas.  In 2005 Chromata White was released as a groundbreaking matte canvas exhibiting unrivaled print quality, archival rating, and consistency, all of which still hold true today.  Over the past several years the Breathing Color team of scientists have been diligently working to develop a new IRC (Inkjet Receptive Coating) that would represent the next evolutionary step forward in print quality and archival technologies of inkjet canvas.  

While Chromata White Canvas is still considered a prominent industry-leader, Lyve Canvas exhibits a noticabley wider color gamut, greater DMax value, and sharper detail, making it a clear choice for the discerning printmaker.  Lyve Canvas is the most recent example of our ongoing commitment to positively contribute the world of photography and fine art, through excellence in print quality and print permanence.

All of the fine art paper and inkjet canvas made by Breathing Color is specifically designed for Epson's Ultrachrome and K3 Inks. Every Epson printer size is also supported with compatible product sizes such as 13", 17", 24", 36" and 44" width rolls. In addition, each product has a custom profile for all Epson printers to ensure color accuracy and ease of use.

In addition to industry-leading inkjet canvas and inkjet papers, Breathing Color also manufactures high-end graphics and signage material known as the Picturesque Collection. Among this collection is our Repositionable Adhesive Vinyl which is well suited for stickers, posters, and decals, due to its easily removable adhesive backing and its outdoor durability. 17" Trial Rolls of Repositionable Adhesive Vinyl are available for testing.

Another very popular alternative to inkjet canvas and fine art paper is our Pure Silk. Exactly like it sounds, this product is 100% Pure Silk, which can be printed directly onto using a pigment-based inkjet printer. It comes on a roll with a rigid removable backing. Our Pure Silk is water-resistant and should be handled just like any other silk. In other words, do not machine wash it, but dry cleaning is acceptable. 17" Trial Rolls of Pure Silk are available for testing.

Epson 7880

No. Both canvas finishes perform the same in terms of color output, density, gamut, and saturation. The only difference is the sheen of the canvas which does not affect the color output on Crystalline.

Epson 9800

The corner braces on the EasyWrappe Pro bars use a friction fit and due to external environmental factors the wood may expand causing the braces to come loose. Moving the canvases from location to location may also cause this to happen. Glueing the corner braces in place helps prevent this from happening. You can also use a small screw at each end of the brace.

The best way is to profile Crystalline with a glossy paper setting, and use the Gloss enhancer on economy mode. This will cover the black ink, which is most susceptible to scuffing.

Add 1 ½" on all 4 sides (3" total) for EW 1.25", and add 2" on all 4 sides (4" total) for EW Pro. The additional ¼" on each side is for bleed that will be trimmed off. The above example would be printed at 19" x 23" for EW 1.25", and 20" x 24" for EW Pro. 

These issues are typically caused by too much coating. Since canvas needs to absorb coating eventy, too much coating creates air pockets in the canvas. When the air tries to escape, it pushes itself out either partially (air bubbles) or completely (pinholes). If you notice these issues while the print is still wet, simply go over these areas with your roller with light pressure (Timeless) or no pressure (Glamour II). If you are spraying with an HVLP gun, try going over the print with a light 2nd coat as this usually fills in the pinholes and breaks the air bubbles. This must be done while the print is wet.

Timeless needs to be applied with pressure, but reducing the amount of pressure when you finish coating is important. If you notice roller marks while the print is still wet, simply go over them with  firm pressure and reduce the pressure with each roll movement. After a few seconds, each roller mark should disappear.

If you have any flakes or chunks of coating in your container, the easiest way to remove them is through a strainer. Just fill your measuring cup with the amount needed, and pour through a strainer into another cup (or container). The strainer will catch everything solid and you can just throw it out. Don’t have a strainer? Use a coffee filter. Just grab a large cup or container and tape a coffee filter to the rim. Then, slowly pour your coating into the filter. A coffee filter takes time for liquid to pass through it, so pour a little at a time. This is a good trick because it will pick up anything that isn’t pure liquid, and the end result is a perfect mix of coating. Read more on our blog post.

Lyve Canvas can be considered the "next generation" of our world-renowned Chromata White Canvas.  In 2005 Chromata White was released as a groundbreaking matte canvas exhibiting unrivaled print quality, archival rating, and consistency, all of which still hold true today.  Over the past several years the Breathing Color team of scientists have been diligently working to develop a new IRC (Inkjet Receptive Coating) that would represent the next evolutionary step forward in print quality and archival technologies of inkjet canvas.  

While Chromata White Canvas is still considered a prominent industry-leader, Lyve Canvas exhibits a noticabley wider color gamut, greater DMax value, and sharper detail, making it a clear choice for the discerning printmaker.  Lyve Canvas is the most recent example of our ongoing commitment to positively contribute the world of photography and fine art, through excellence in print quality and print permanence.

Epson 9800 General Information

The Epson 9800 printer Ink Jet Printer with New Epson UltraChrome K3 Inks mark defining moment in history of photography and professional graphics new professional Wide-Format printer use color and unique Three-Level Black Ink System to create highest quality archival black and white images. Epson is once again advancing its printing technology into new territory for professional photographers and graphic artists with the launch of the Epson Stylus Pro 9800, and new Epson UltraChrome K3 ink technology. The combination of this new printer and archival inks not only gives today's most demanding professionals an almost infinite degree of black and white image control.

Stylus Pro 9800 - No limitations

"By combining the high-precision of a new Epson Stylus Pro print engine with the extraordinary performance of Epson UltraChrome K3 ink technology, today's most discerning creative professionals have the tools to express their true creative visions," said Mark Radogna, group product manager, professional graphics, Epson. "Whether an artist's goal is to create the best exhibit-quality color prints possible or world-class black and white photography, their only limita-tions will be talent and imagination."

Epson 9800 - A Fast Inkjet Printer

Epson's new high-performance, one-inch wide print head features 180 nozzles per channel and can achieve resolution levels up to 2880 x 1440 dpi with variable-sized ink droplets as small as 3.5 picoliters. The Epson Stylus Pro 9800 offer print speeds approximately two times faster than his predecessor, the Epson Stylus Pro 9600. Photo lab-quality 44" x 60" prints can be printed in approximately 42 minutes, 30 seconds (using 1,440 x 720 dpi - HS mode). Epson has enhanced its manufacturing process to include colorimetric calibration. A technology called Epson PreciseColor evaluates each printer's output during the manufacturing process and automatically fine tunes each printer's settings to ensure consistent color output from one printer to the next. Setup time is also greatly reduced by a built-in auto head alignment feature. This technology uses a built-in white beam sensor that automatically scans printed alignment patterns created by the printer and then makes automated adjustments if necessary. The same white beam sensor is also used to detect clogged nozzles and automatically activate head cleaning cycles if necessary.

Epson Stylus Pro 9800 printer - Increased image quality

Inspired by Epson's past generations of pigmented inks, Epson UltraChrome K3 uses higher density pigments designed to increase image quality for both professional color and black and white prints. In addition to cyan, magenta, yellow, light cyan and light magenta, Epson UltraChrome K3 features a unique three-level black ink system that simultaneously uses black, light black and light-light black inks. This technology is designed to create professional neutral and toned black and white prints without color crossover or color casts. It also reduces the effects of metamerism or bronzing often associated with basic pigment chemistry. Furthermore, Epson's proprietary driver and screening technology offer users a unique method for converting color digital images into professional quality black and white prints. Epson UltraChrome K3 also produces higher degrees of color fidelity and uses a new high-gloss Microcrystal Encapsulation resin chemistry to create prints with greater scratch resistance and reduced gloss differential. These prints are rated to resist fading up to 108 years for color prints and more than 200 years for black and white prints on specific Epson papers.

Epson 9800 printer - Ink and Media

The Epson 9800 printer offers users two unique ink modes - Photo Black and Matte Black - that are designed to optimize the level of black ink density on different types of media. The Photo Black ink mode can be selected to help maximize the deepness and richness of black tones on glossy/luster media such as Epson's Premium Luster. The Matte Black mode uses a different black density to maximize the deepness and richness of black tones on fine art surfaces such as Epson's Velvet Fine Art, Enhanced Matte and UltraSmooth Fine Art.

Epson 9800 Ink Jet printer - Professional Media Handling

The Epson Stylus Pro 9800 can handle virtually any type of media, either in rolls up to 44 inches wide or cut sheets between 8" x 10" and 17" x 22". Both cut-sheet and roll media are loaded via the printers' straight-through media path. An optional automatic take-up reel system is also available exclusively on the Epson Stylus Pro 9800 for unattended production of large print runs. There are four ways to load media, which include an adjustable roll feed for 2-inch and 3-inch cores, a high-capacity cut-sheet tray for up to 50 sheets of photographic media, top manual feed, and straight-through front manual feed capable of handling up to 1.5-millimeter-thick poster board. The Epson Stylus Pro 9800 also supports printing on both sides of the media without damaging the previously printed side and has a built-in media cutter that automatically trims top and bottom edges of roll media safely and accurately to produce full-bleed images on all four sides.

Epson 9800 printer - Intelligent High-Capacity Ink technology

Each of these new printers' ink cartridge channels/slots can handle either 110 ml or 220 ml cartridges (or a combination of both sizes) that can even be replaced in the middle of a print job. Each cartridge uses Epson's Intelligent High-Capacity Ink technology, a feature that stores a variety of information on a memory chip and communicates the data to the printer whenever the power is turned on. Also, the printers use built-in memory to track key print job statistics such as ink levels, ink usage, remaining media, print times, data file names, user names and print dates.

All of the fine art paper and inkjet canvas made by Breathing Color is specifically designed for Epson's Ultrachrome and K3 Inks. Every Epson printer size is also supported with compatible product sizes such as 13", 17", 24", 36" and 44" width rolls. In addition, each product has a custom profile for all Epson printers to ensure color accuracy and ease of use.

In addition to industry-leading inkjet canvas and inkjet papers, Breathing Color also manufactures high-end graphics and signage material known as the Picturesque Collection. Among this collection is our Repositionable Adhesive Vinyl which is well suited for stickers, posters, and decals, due to its easily removable adhesive backing and its outdoor durability. 17" Trial Rolls of Repositionable Adhesive Vinyl are available for testing.

Another very popular alternative to inkjet canvas and fine art paper is our Pure Silk. Exactly like it sounds, this product is 100% Pure Silk, which can be printed directly onto using a pigment-based inkjet printer. It comes on a roll with a rigid removable backing. Our Pure Silk is water-resistant and should be handled just like any other silk. In other words, do not machine wash it, but dry cleaning is acceptable. 17" Trial Rolls of Pure Silk are available for testing.

Epson 9880

No. Both canvas finishes perform the same in terms of color output, density, gamut, and saturation. The only difference is the sheen of the canvas which does not affect the color output on Crystalline.

Epson Printers

A. 90 psi @ 2CFM or greater.  This can easily be obtained with a typical “pancake” compressor that can be purchased at Home Depot or Lowes. Here is a link to just a few. <click here>

Yes, they are extremely reliable. We chose to use pneumatic components specifically for their reliability and accessibility.

These Stretcher Sticks are by far the cheapest way to stretch your canvas prints if you have the appropriate equipment.

Edge curl is something that most users have learned to deal with, but there are ways to remove it.  We have found an easy and affordable method for flattening your prints. The best part is you can use supplies you already have in your print shop! Here are the supplies you’ll need:

  1. An empty 3" core (save the core from your last roll of fine art paper)
  2. 2 sheets of foam packing material
  3. Tape

Read more about how to remove this type edge curl here on our blog, The Art of Printmaking.

 

A white, cloudy appearance in the coating is typically caused by the canvas or fine art print not being allowed enough time to outgas after coming off the printer. Outgassing is basically the process of water evaporating from aqueous inks during the drying process. Outgassing time will vary dependent upon temperature, humidity, and the amount of ink that is printed on the media. It is always safest to allow 24 hours for the print to dry prior to coating.

Since each person's environment and use of these products can vary, it can be difficult to put a firm number to how much surface area a gallon of coating will cover. With that in mind, our estimates are as follows:

A gallon of Timeless: 300-400 sq.ft.

A gallon of Glamour 2 (diluted 30% w/ distilled water): 390-520 sq.ft.

 

Any coated canvas—either glossy or satin—will be more susceptible to curling. This curling is most often caused imperfect atmospheric conditions. We have come up with the following quick start guide to help troubleshoot these issues: Crystalline Quick Start Guide 

Yes, because of the unique design of the tool finishing off the wrapped corner is easy and effortless. The extension on the bottom jaw, which is the fulcrum or pivoting point for stretching, has a notch on either side of it. Once you have folded the canvas and you’re ready to complete the wrapped corner, the notch on the bottom jaw will allow you to stretch the canvas on top of the stretcher bar.  This unique feature also allows the tool to stretch over forty-five degree and center supports on larger stretcher bars. You can view this in the demonstration in Figures 8 and 9 of the user manual.

The StretchRelief™  will easily gallery wrap on any type of stretcher bar. The amount of canvas that you need extending beyond the inside of the stretcher bar is three quarters of an inch. For example: if you are stretching on a standard three-quarter inch thick stretcher bar, you add three quarters plus the width of the bar which is typically one and a half inches. To this amount you would add three quarters of an inch which would give you a total of three inches. Accounting for both sides you would double this number which would mean that your total extra canvas beyond the image size would be six inches. Using this formula for gallery wrapping an 18x24 inch frame, you would need a canvas size of 24x30 inches.

Add 1 ½" on all 4 sides (3" total) for EW 1.25", and add 2" on all 4 sides (4" total) for EW Pro. The additional ¼" on each side is for bleed that will be trimmed off. The above example would be printed at 19" x 23" for EW 1.25", and 20" x 24" for EW Pro. 

Epson 9800 General Information

The Epson 9800 printer Ink Jet Printer with New Epson UltraChrome K3 Inks mark defining moment in history of photography and professional graphics new professional Wide-Format printer use color and unique Three-Level Black Ink System to create highest quality archival black and white images. Epson is once again advancing its printing technology into new territory for professional photographers and graphic artists with the launch of the Epson Stylus Pro 9800, and new Epson UltraChrome K3 ink technology. The combination of this new printer and archival inks not only gives today's most demanding professionals an almost infinite degree of black and white image control.

Stylus Pro 9800 - No limitations

"By combining the high-precision of a new Epson Stylus Pro print engine with the extraordinary performance of Epson UltraChrome K3 ink technology, today's most discerning creative professionals have the tools to express their true creative visions," said Mark Radogna, group product manager, professional graphics, Epson. "Whether an artist's goal is to create the best exhibit-quality color prints possible or world-class black and white photography, their only limita-tions will be talent and imagination."

Epson 9800 - A Fast Inkjet Printer

Epson's new high-performance, one-inch wide print head features 180 nozzles per channel and can achieve resolution levels up to 2880 x 1440 dpi with variable-sized ink droplets as small as 3.5 picoliters. The Epson Stylus Pro 9800 offer print speeds approximately two times faster than his predecessor, the Epson Stylus Pro 9600. Photo lab-quality 44" x 60" prints can be printed in approximately 42 minutes, 30 seconds (using 1,440 x 720 dpi - HS mode). Epson has enhanced its manufacturing process to include colorimetric calibration. A technology called Epson PreciseColor evaluates each printer's output during the manufacturing process and automatically fine tunes each printer's settings to ensure consistent color output from one printer to the next. Setup time is also greatly reduced by a built-in auto head alignment feature. This technology uses a built-in white beam sensor that automatically scans printed alignment patterns created by the printer and then makes automated adjustments if necessary. The same white beam sensor is also used to detect clogged nozzles and automatically activate head cleaning cycles if necessary.

Epson Stylus Pro 9800 printer - Increased image quality

Inspired by Epson's past generations of pigmented inks, Epson UltraChrome K3 uses higher density pigments designed to increase image quality for both professional color and black and white prints. In addition to cyan, magenta, yellow, light cyan and light magenta, Epson UltraChrome K3 features a unique three-level black ink system that simultaneously uses black, light black and light-light black inks. This technology is designed to create professional neutral and toned black and white prints without color crossover or color casts. It also reduces the effects of metamerism or bronzing often associated with basic pigment chemistry. Furthermore, Epson's proprietary driver and screening technology offer users a unique method for converting color digital images into professional quality black and white prints. Epson UltraChrome K3 also produces higher degrees of color fidelity and uses a new high-gloss Microcrystal Encapsulation resin chemistry to create prints with greater scratch resistance and reduced gloss differential. These prints are rated to resist fading up to 108 years for color prints and more than 200 years for black and white prints on specific Epson papers.

Epson 9800 printer - Ink and Media

The Epson 9800 printer offers users two unique ink modes - Photo Black and Matte Black - that are designed to optimize the level of black ink density on different types of media. The Photo Black ink mode can be selected to help maximize the deepness and richness of black tones on glossy/luster media such as Epson's Premium Luster. The Matte Black mode uses a different black density to maximize the deepness and richness of black tones on fine art surfaces such as Epson's Velvet Fine Art, Enhanced Matte and UltraSmooth Fine Art.

Epson 9800 Ink Jet printer - Professional Media Handling

The Epson Stylus Pro 9800 can handle virtually any type of media, either in rolls up to 44 inches wide or cut sheets between 8" x 10" and 17" x 22". Both cut-sheet and roll media are loaded via the printers' straight-through media path. An optional automatic take-up reel system is also available exclusively on the Epson Stylus Pro 9800 for unattended production of large print runs. There are four ways to load media, which include an adjustable roll feed for 2-inch and 3-inch cores, a high-capacity cut-sheet tray for up to 50 sheets of photographic media, top manual feed, and straight-through front manual feed capable of handling up to 1.5-millimeter-thick poster board. The Epson Stylus Pro 9800 also supports printing on both sides of the media without damaging the previously printed side and has a built-in media cutter that automatically trims top and bottom edges of roll media safely and accurately to produce full-bleed images on all four sides.

Epson 9800 printer - Intelligent High-Capacity Ink technology

Each of these new printers' ink cartridge channels/slots can handle either 110 ml or 220 ml cartridges (or a combination of both sizes) that can even be replaced in the middle of a print job. Each cartridge uses Epson's Intelligent High-Capacity Ink technology, a feature that stores a variety of information on a memory chip and communicates the data to the printer whenever the power is turned on. Also, the printers use built-in memory to track key print job statistics such as ink levels, ink usage, remaining media, print times, data file names, user names and print dates.

Fine Art Paper

A. 90 psi @ 2CFM or greater.  This can easily be obtained with a typical “pancake” compressor that can be purchased at Home Depot or Lowes. Here is a link to just a few. <click here>

A. No, but we recommend using a long-nose staple gun for access.  We currently sell (2) different models of long-nose staple guns, the Fasco F1B8016LN and the Omer 8016LN.

Yes, they are extremely reliable. We chose to use pneumatic components specifically for their reliability and accessibility.

To prevent the transfer of oils and dirt from your hands to the inkjet receptive coating of the media, white cotton gloves should be worn when handling the media. When not using the media, you should store it in its original packaging, exactly how it was shipped to you. Read more about our recommended handling and storage best practices on our blog, The Art of Printmaking.

Trying new products can be an exciting experience, but can also be a disappointment if the first print does not end up way you want it to. This is why it’s important to make sure that you not only print with the proper settings, but you also print with great test images. We offer trial rolls for all of our products to give you the opportunity to run test prints, build profiles, and ultimately compare it to what you currently have. When you receive your trial roll, you’ll want to download and install the right profile. Get more detailed information about how we recommend testing our different products here on our blog, The Art of Printmaking.

Yes. Once you have tightly stretched the canvas the tool is designed to lay the canvas down flat on the back of the stretcher bar. You will be able to shoot the staple in all the way, every time. You can view this in Figure 6 of the user manual.

Large stretching machines not only require a substantial investment for the machine itself, but also require the use of an air compressor. In side-by-side testing, the StretchRelief™, at a fraction of the cost, has been found to give a much tighter stretch than any other stretching device on the market today. The StretchRelief™ also makes it easier to keep the image centered on the stretcher bar because you are able to monitor the positioning of the stretched image as you work.

Our clients who have used both a stretching machine and our StretchRelief™ tool have reported greater success and satisfaction with the StretchRelief™.

The StretchRelief redefines the concept of a stretching plier. Unlike conventional pliers, which have a very limited life span, the StretchRelief™’s precision machined design will give you thousands of stretches. With the StretchRelief™ you will now be able to greatly increase your production output for a relatively small investment. Breathing Color has finally solved the otherwise difficult problem of gallery wrap stretching with this amazing and cost effective tool.

This depends on a few factors (temperature, humidity), but in most cases a print coated with Timeless will be dry in about an hour. Under ideal printing/coating conditions (50-70 degrees F; 30-50% indoor humidity), Timeless can dry in about half the time.

You list profiles for both matte and photo black (Epson 9800) for Brilliance Chromata White Canvas - which ink type provides the best results?

Is there a Canadian distributor?

Breathing Color Media can be used with either matte black (MK) or photo black (PK) inks exceptionally well. However, as a general rule, matte papers look best with MK ink and glossy papers look best with PK ink. When considering whether to load your printer with matte or photo black, you must consider the primary source of your business. If you run a photo lab for example and predominantly print on glossy surfaces, it is in your best interest to use the photo black. You will still have the ability to print on matte papers, but your best prints will be with the substrate you print with most often, glossy papers. Likewise, if your are in the business of fine art reproduction and predominantly print on matte fine art papers and canvas, the matte black ink will render a significantly higher Dmax (maximum black density) than that of the photo black. As a printmaker of any kind, achieving the highest Dmax possible is of great importance as black density is a major distinguishing factor between a good print and a great one. It is common for high-end printmakers to utilize both matte and photo black inks in separate printers. This is the best way to ensure that the proper ink is being applied to the proper substrate. A recent alternative to owning two separate printers can be found through RIP software programs such as Image Print by Colorbyte Software, where they offer the option of using both PK and MK in the newest Epson K3 printers.

In addition, most all glossy papers are not printable with the matte black inks. Because MK was not designed to print on glossy surfaces, the ink will run and smear easily if attempted. For this reason many fine art printmakers have been forced to use the PK ink to avoid losing established glossy paper business. The Breathing Color Vibrance Gloss and Vibrance Semi-Gloss were created for this purpose as they dry instantly and look amazing when printed with the MK ink. These two products have been designed to allow fine art printmakers to use the MK inks to produce the highest quality watercolor and canvas prints, without losing their photography customers.

The Epson 9800, Epson 7800, and Epson 4800 printers (9600, 7600 also) do allow you to choose between using Photo Black or Matte Black. However, not only does it allow you to choose -- it basically forces to you choose because changing the inks later on will cost significantly you in ink, time, and resources. With this option in front of you, should you use Matte Black or Photo Black?

This is actually a very simply answer and we will explain it as simply as possible. The answer depends on your particular business. If you are a fine art printing company that will be primarily printing onto matte inkjet canvas and matte fine art papers, then you need to use matte black. When used on matte inkjet canvas or papers, the matte black is going to give you a much higher black density (called "Dmax", or black "pop"). The difference is significant. Even today you will find some printmakers naively using photo black inks and printing onto matte canvases or papers and selling them to artists as if they are "the best you can get". It is truly unbelievable. These people need to get with the times and either swap out the photo black cartridge or only print onto glossy substrates. The fine art printmaking industrty is still very fragmented rather than centralized and organized in a yellow-pages like fashion, so some businesses are going to be able to get away with this incompatibility for some time. Needless to say, this really is a losing strategy in the competitive lanscape. This is common knowledge to any self-respecting fine art printmaker, who has done enough due diligence to know that matte black ink should be used on matte substrates.

This doesn't mean the every single fine art printmaker must be using matte black ink. It's important to understand that if a fine art printmaker is printing onto a glossy inkjet canvas, he will want to use Photo Black ink instead. This is because the matte black ink is not micro-encapsulated and it will therefore not adhere well to glossy, luster, or semigloss coated papers or canvas.  Glossy canvas, like glossy photo paper, is a glossy substrate and therefore photo black ink will also allow for the higher Dmax. This is why you will find many photo labs across the world using the Photo black ink cartridge -- they print on glossy substrates more often than not, and therefore need to have a printer using the Matte Black ink.

If the printmaker is going to then switch to printing on a matte fine art paper and he demands the highest quality standards, he will need to either switch out the photo black ink cartridge for the matte black, or have an additional printer set up with the photo black ink cartridge. Since the Epson printers are so inexpensive, most businesses these days simply keep an additional Epson 9800, Epson 7800, or Epson 4800 on hand with the opposite black ink cartridge.

Note that its the Photo Black ink that comes with your printer when you purchase it.  If you want to use matte black right from the start, you need to request this cartridge. 

If you are using the ImagePrint RIP (Raster-Image Processor) from Colorbyte, most of our inkjet canvas and fine art papers have been profiled by their technicians and are available for free download on their website. You may obtain them by clicking here

*this article will help if you are looking for Imageprint profiles, Colorbyte profiles, profiles for RIP, RIP to use with Breathing Color

If an inkjet canvas cracks or tears when stretched over frames this is simply unacceptable and should serve as a huge red flag. If a canvas shows that it will crack, however slightly, when stretched over frames, you can be assured that this print will continue to crack and deteriorate over time. The bottom line is that your inkjet canvas and your liquid lamination coating are not specifically made to compliment one another. Furthermore, using them any longer than you are is only putting your prints and your business at risk. Unfortunately this young industry is flooded with inkjet suppliers who confidently sell canvas and coating combinations to fine art printmakers that, simply put, crack right in front of your eyes when minimal resistance is applied and/or when only a short period of time has elapsed.

Our Brilliance Chromata White Canvas, when coated with our water-based liquid lamination product called Glamour II Veneer, will absolutely NEVER crack or tear. The combination of the two products results in the highest quality canvas and coating combination in the fine art industry. Prior to release, both products were rigorously and specifically tested to ensure maximized longevity and to address this apparent void in the industry.

Fine Art Paper

Epson 9800 General Information

The Epson 9800 printer Ink Jet Printer with New Epson UltraChrome K3 Inks mark defining moment in history of photography and professional graphics new professional Wide-Format printer use color and unique Three-Level Black Ink System to create highest quality archival black and white images. Epson is once again advancing its printing technology into new territory for professional photographers and graphic artists with the launch of the Epson Stylus Pro 9800, and new Epson UltraChrome K3 ink technology. The combination of this new printer and archival inks not only gives today's most demanding professionals an almost infinite degree of black and white image control.

Stylus Pro 9800 - No limitations

"By combining the high-precision of a new Epson Stylus Pro print engine with the extraordinary performance of Epson UltraChrome K3 ink technology, today's most discerning creative professionals have the tools to express their true creative visions," said Mark Radogna, group product manager, professional graphics, Epson. "Whether an artist's goal is to create the best exhibit-quality color prints possible or world-class black and white photography, their only limita-tions will be talent and imagination."

Epson 9800 - A Fast Inkjet Printer

Epson's new high-performance, one-inch wide print head features 180 nozzles per channel and can achieve resolution levels up to 2880 x 1440 dpi with variable-sized ink droplets as small as 3.5 picoliters. The Epson Stylus Pro 9800 offer print speeds approximately two times faster than his predecessor, the Epson Stylus Pro 9600. Photo lab-quality 44" x 60" prints can be printed in approximately 42 minutes, 30 seconds (using 1,440 x 720 dpi - HS mode). Epson has enhanced its manufacturing process to include colorimetric calibration. A technology called Epson PreciseColor evaluates each printer's output during the manufacturing process and automatically fine tunes each printer's settings to ensure consistent color output from one printer to the next. Setup time is also greatly reduced by a built-in auto head alignment feature. This technology uses a built-in white beam sensor that automatically scans printed alignment patterns created by the printer and then makes automated adjustments if necessary. The same white beam sensor is also used to detect clogged nozzles and automatically activate head cleaning cycles if necessary.

Epson Stylus Pro 9800 printer - Increased image quality

Inspired by Epson's past generations of pigmented inks, Epson UltraChrome K3 uses higher density pigments designed to increase image quality for both professional color and black and white prints. In addition to cyan, magenta, yellow, light cyan and light magenta, Epson UltraChrome K3 features a unique three-level black ink system that simultaneously uses black, light black and light-light black inks. This technology is designed to create professional neutral and toned black and white prints without color crossover or color casts. It also reduces the effects of metamerism or bronzing often associated with basic pigment chemistry. Furthermore, Epson's proprietary driver and screening technology offer users a unique method for converting color digital images into professional quality black and white prints. Epson UltraChrome K3 also produces higher degrees of color fidelity and uses a new high-gloss Microcrystal Encapsulation resin chemistry to create prints with greater scratch resistance and reduced gloss differential. These prints are rated to resist fading up to 108 years for color prints and more than 200 years for black and white prints on specific Epson papers.

For borderless printing, the Epson print engine enlarges the image size slightly (about 5 percent or a bit less) to ensure that the image is not printed with any white edges due to paper misalignment. You can minimize the clipping by resizing your image to actual paper size (e.g., 13" x 19", 4" x 6"), and then setting Print with Preview to center the image and print it at 96% of actual size. The clipping dialog still comes up (it will whenever you are printing in the printer's defined margins), but tell it OK. You can try using 95% if there is still too much clipping.

In this Article we will take a closer look at the Epson 11880 Vivid Magenta Inkset. These are brand new ink cartridges designed for these new Epson Stylus Pro Series printers only. It is first important to note that these vivid magenta inkset cartridges are NOT compatible with older printer models such as the Epson Stylus Pro 9800 and Epson Stylus Pro 7800 . Although they will work, they are reported to ruin the print heads within a short period of time such as 6 months. Althought this information has not been confirmed by a third party Epson user as of the date of this writing, it should be noted. Also note that we are only referring to the two vivid magenta cartirdges; not the other colors which can be used interchangeably with other Epson Stylus Pro Series printer models.

Epson UltraChrome/K3 Ink Technology with Vivid Magenta * High-density pigments for an extremely wide color gamut * New formulation of Magenta pigments for extreme blues and purples * Professional print permanence ratings for truly sellable quality prints * High-gloss Microcrystal Encapsulation technology for reduced gloss differential * Superior scratch resistance from improved pigment and resin chemistry * Color is stable immediately after printing - no short-term color shifting * Produces a black density up to 2.55 with an L* value of 2.9*

Like the older prints by Epson such as the Epson Stylus Pro 9800 and Epson Stylus Pro 7800, these new printers - the Epson 11880, Epson 9880, and Epson 7880 printers have 8-channel printheads. However, these new inkjet printers incorporate the new MicoPiezo AMC Printhead technology. These new heads are quite remarkable in that they have a new ink repelling coating technology which reduces head clogging and by simplifying the need for cleaning these new printheads are especially useful for dusty or linty papers, such as fine art papers or canvas. The printheads also offer more advanced Active Meniscus Control (AMC). Active Meniscus Control is intended to significantly improve dot regularity and dot placement. Although Active Meniscus Control technology was used in prior printer models (this is the third generation), the performance in the Epson 11880 is reported to be stunningly more than 100 times as accurate when compared to a model such as the Epson 9800.

If you hare having problems printing Brilliance Chromata White with either the Epson 7600 or 9600 reguarding the "Reload Paper" dialog, there are settings that may need to be changed to fix this problem.

  • If you have the Platen Gap set to WIDEST change it to WIDE.
  • Edit the setting on the printer to turn off "Paper Size Check" - PPR SIZE CHK = OFF
  • Wihin your printer driver configure the "Paper Suction" to -1

General Information

A. 90 psi @ 2CFM or greater.  This can easily be obtained with a typical “pancake” compressor that can be purchased at Home Depot or Lowes. Here is a link to just a few. <click here>

No, however, it does make for a cleaner more refined look. Take a look at the video demonstration on the "details" tab.

A. No, but we recommend using a long-nose staple gun for access.  We currently sell (2) different models of long-nose staple guns, the Fasco F1B8016LN and the Omer 8016LN.

Yes, they are extremely reliable. We chose to use pneumatic components specifically for their reliability and accessibility.

We designed this machine for that very purpose, however, it is also capable of producing regular stretches.

Canvas floater frames are a unique way to display your 1.25" or 1.5"-deep stretched canvas prints. Your print sits centered inside the frame (using double-sided tape or hook and loop tape for easy swapping or repositioning of your art) appearing to float! The inside of each frame has a black finish to make it easy to replicate the "float" effect that artists used to try to achieve using black tape around the edges of their canvas prints.

The grasping pins in the top jaw in conjunction with the locking pliers do all the work. The weight, resulting from the solid steel construction, also helps the tool do the work for you. When the tool pivots off the extension on the bottom jaw the tool is engineered to eliminate the need for any hand strength. This is  a totally new concept for a hand held stretching device. All of the stretching pliers on the market rely on the users ability to continually squeeze down on the handles to hold the canvas. This results in tremendous hand fatigue after just a few stretches. With the Stretch Relief™, you will be able to stretch all day long and your hand at the end of the day won’t even know you’ve been working. You’ll also notice that your canvases are completely wrinkle free and tighter than ever before.

Large stretching machines not only require a substantial investment for the machine itself, but also require the use of an air compressor. In side-by-side testing, the StretchRelief™, at a fraction of the cost, has been found to give a much tighter stretch than any other stretching device on the market today. The StretchRelief™ also makes it easier to keep the image centered on the stretcher bar because you are able to monitor the positioning of the stretched image as you work.

Our clients who have used both a stretching machine and our StretchRelief™ tool have reported greater success and satisfaction with the StretchRelief™.

The StretchRelief redefines the concept of a stretching plier. Unlike conventional pliers, which have a very limited life span, the StretchRelief™’s precision machined design will give you thousands of stretches. With the StretchRelief™ you will now be able to greatly increase your production output for a relatively small investment. Breathing Color has finally solved the otherwise difficult problem of gallery wrap stretching with this amazing and cost effective tool.

Center braces are for EW Pro only. A 20" x 30" gallery wrap and larger should use a center brace. 20" center braces are the smallest size . If you are doing large panoramic gallery wraps, you may want to use additional center braces.

This depends on a few factors (temperature, humidity), but in most cases a print coated with Timeless will be dry in about an hour. Under ideal printing/coating conditions (50-70 degrees F; 30-50% indoor humidity), Timeless can dry in about half the time.

For borderless printing, the Epson print engine enlarges the image size slightly (about 5 percent or a bit less) to ensure that the image is not printed with any white edges due to paper misalignment. You can minimize the clipping by resizing your image to actual paper size (e.g., 13" x 19", 4" x 6"), and then setting Print with Preview to center the image and print it at 96% of actual size. The clipping dialog still comes up (it will whenever you are printing in the printer's defined margins), but tell it OK. You can try using 95% if there is still too much clipping.

In this Article we will take a closer look at the Epson 11880 Vivid Magenta Inkset. These are brand new ink cartridges designed for these new Epson Stylus Pro Series printers only. It is first important to note that these vivid magenta inkset cartridges are NOT compatible with older printer models such as the Epson Stylus Pro 9800 and Epson Stylus Pro 7800 . Although they will work, they are reported to ruin the print heads within a short period of time such as 6 months. Althought this information has not been confirmed by a third party Epson user as of the date of this writing, it should be noted. Also note that we are only referring to the two vivid magenta cartirdges; not the other colors which can be used interchangeably with other Epson Stylus Pro Series printer models.

Epson UltraChrome/K3 Ink Technology with Vivid Magenta * High-density pigments for an extremely wide color gamut * New formulation of Magenta pigments for extreme blues and purples * Professional print permanence ratings for truly sellable quality prints * High-gloss Microcrystal Encapsulation technology for reduced gloss differential * Superior scratch resistance from improved pigment and resin chemistry * Color is stable immediately after printing - no short-term color shifting * Produces a black density up to 2.55 with an L* value of 2.9*

There are a couple different acceptable methods for switching between black inks in your Epson printer.  If you haven't already, you may want to contact your Epson Dealer and speak with a representative and hear what they recommend.  Another valuable resource for you will be message boards and discussion forums related to Epson wide-format printers. Here you can search for information on this topic and others to gain the tips, tricks, and advice from other Epson owners.  Among these forums you may find that the Yahoo Group titled Epson Wide Format to be the most helpful and I am positive that this topic has been widely discussed

http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/EpsonWideFormat/

SEISMIC ANALOGIES IN WIDE FORMAT

Congratulations! Six months ago you took delivery of your new Epson wide format printer and you are now outputting top quality photographic or fine art pieces on art paper, film and/or canvas. By now you have obtained a good grasp of the color management requirements and operational details. You have mastered the market that Epson has targeted for these incredible machines and hopefully you are making a profit in the process. You are also a player in a fascinating seismic change in market conditions, which has been taking place over the last decade due to the evolution of digital technology. This tidal wave of change has allowed you to be doing what you are doing right now with your Epson printer. It is also right behind your back ready to sweep you away in a bubbling backwash of “creative destruction”.

Don’t think you are at risk? Take a look at the short history of high end digital art production. Ten years ago the entire market was dominated by a small group of publishers who financed, printed or outsourced, and distributed art. The first seismic shift occurred with the application of high-end Iris printers being used to produce prints. The dynamics involved in marketing an edition has changed dramatically over a short period of only a few years. Instead of needing $20,000 for a serigraphic edition, one could output art on demand, lowering the financial barrier of entry of running small editions, 40 fold. Sell a few, and then print a few more. An artist could now publish himself (self-empowerment). The $100,000 price tag of an Iris was a new financial barrier creating a new series of companies that began printing for both publishers and artists who were savvy enough to be able to market their products themselves. Publishers and serigraphic printers were stunned by this. Does everyone remember the “Giclee” vs Serigraphy debate? How about further back when Serigraphy was the new kid on the block and the battlefield was Serigraphy vs. Stone Litho? History has proven to us that it is almost always a bad plan defending old business/technology models vs. new business/technology models with inherent advantages. Although the older models may suffice in the short term, they rarely withstand the pressures of an advancing industry over the long term. This is not to say that a few fine boutique operations (including a few fine stone litho operations) cannot survive the turmoil. But the vast majority of them are now going or gone.

The next seismic shift occurred with the introduction of the first usable generation of pigmented inks from Epson. Epson “Archival Inks” were a major breakthrough that forever changed the entire printmaking landscape, yet again. Certainly by now we are all aware of its shortcomings; lower color gamut, metamerism, too much glycol, and sensitivity to ozone (First generations always have their problems, in products and in everything else). But did you not feel the ground shift beneath your feet when this technology was released? Did you not feel the entire landscape experience another contortion? To most, this contortion could be reasonably described as seismic industry activity. Print longevity, the “Achilles’ Heel” of the giclee market, was being aggressively addressed. For a tenth of the cost of an Iris, this particular micro-world became Epson’s overnight (please, no Roland comments as they were very creatively using Epson technology). Iris was forced aside from that point forward. You can pick up an Iris on EBay for a song (although I wouldn’t be singing)! While, Iris studios still exist and they continue making beautiful prints, the fact remains that it is a market in contraction. This market will continue to contract. In summary, the introduction of low-cost printers created the following market changes; lower cost of entry, publishers became less important, the level of expertise required for printmaking significantly decreased, and the market expanded.

This brings us to the introduction of Ultrachrome inks. Could this be considered another seismic event? Most industry veterans would support this claim. In fact, there is a strong chance that the majority of you reading this article began digital printing as a result of Epson’s release of the Ultrachrome Inks.

In reality, the introduction of Ultrachrome Inks was more of a strong aftershock than a unique cataclysmic event. Although marketed as a “new” product by Epson, Ultrachrome was actually a graceful extension of the Archival Inks. The issues that plagued the Archival Inks were being addressed and the product had improved. Namely, the print quality was significantly better, the ease of operation was improved upon, and the cost of entry was cut in half.

Now that we are up to speed, what does the market currently look like? Today, for only a few thousand dollars, just about anyone can set themselves up as a digital print studio. Granted, it still takes expertise to produce a truly great product. Though, little by little that barrier is being compromised by continuous substrate developments, color management improvements, Photoshop upgrades, new software development, and continuous innovation from Epson and other manufacturers. These products will eventually become completely turnkey, allowing the novice printmakers of tomorrow to produce visually indistinguishable prints from your knowledge-invested prints of today.

Make no mistake about it; the current value that you add to the present economical equation is through your technical knowledge on how to make a beautiful print. In the mainstream photographic and fine-art markets, that value is going to contract. Are you prepared for this?

How do you prepare for the continuous seismic events shaking your livelihood? The first step is to use your current cash flow stream to distinguish yourself from the mainstream flow of product development. Distance yourself from what will be replaced, inevitably, with improved technology. This, of course, does not mean that you should stop using products that are generating current profits. It does mean that you should continuously look for specialty markets that are growing in which you can develop unique knowledge that will provide you with future source of income.

As companies like Epson and HP grows in size, their internal requirements to enter a specialty markets naturally increase. This will open opportunities in specialty markets that Epson hasn’t automated (or maybe never will) because the market is not big enough for them to waste their time on it. These are the markets you need to capitalize on. Large corporations like Epson and HP will only enter and automate markets that cross a certain revenue threshold and that bar will consistently move higher as long as Epson grows in size. These are the markets you need to diversify away from.

How do you spot these unique opportunities? You don’t necessarily have to be the trail blazer, innovating everything yourself. In today’s world, the best growth opportunities reach your critical-mass size when a small group of innovators band together to share information on a growing market that excites them. With the information availability of the internet, these groups share an amazing amount of information online (that in the past would have been proprietary). This free flow of information has had the desirable effect of causing rapid innovation growth and turbo charging new market expansion. Therein lays the opportunity to earn.

Today’s printmaking entrepreneur (and most of you are exactly that) will have to be nimble and constantly able to reinvent themselves, evolving with the competitive landscape of this industry. You must be realistic in evaluating where technology in going and how that will help you or hinder your future earning potential. Most importantly, you must have the ability to spot seismic events that will drastically change the entire environment, even when it’s not initially noticeable. Only then can you tailor a long-term strategy to meet the demands of the ever-changing marketplace.

This article was written as a collaboration of the R&D department at Breathing Color, Inc.  This article reflects the views of individuals within that department.  It does not reflect the views of management of Breathing Color, Inc.

You list profiles for both matte and photo black (Epson 9800) for Brilliance Chromata White Canvas - which ink type provides the best results?

Is there a Canadian distributor?

Breathing Color Media can be used with either matte black (MK) or photo black (PK) inks exceptionally well. However, as a general rule, matte papers look best with MK ink and glossy papers look best with PK ink. When considering whether to load your printer with matte or photo black, you must consider the primary source of your business. If you run a photo lab for example and predominantly print on glossy surfaces, it is in your best interest to use the photo black. You will still have the ability to print on matte papers, but your best prints will be with the substrate you print with most often, glossy papers. Likewise, if your are in the business of fine art reproduction and predominantly print on matte fine art papers and canvas, the matte black ink will render a significantly higher Dmax (maximum black density) than that of the photo black. As a printmaker of any kind, achieving the highest Dmax possible is of great importance as black density is a major distinguishing factor between a good print and a great one. It is common for high-end printmakers to utilize both matte and photo black inks in separate printers. This is the best way to ensure that the proper ink is being applied to the proper substrate. A recent alternative to owning two separate printers can be found through RIP software programs such as Image Print by Colorbyte Software, where they offer the option of using both PK and MK in the newest Epson K3 printers.

In addition, most all glossy papers are not printable with the matte black inks. Because MK was not designed to print on glossy surfaces, the ink will run and smear easily if attempted. For this reason many fine art printmakers have been forced to use the PK ink to avoid losing established glossy paper business. The Breathing Color Vibrance Gloss and Vibrance Semi-Gloss were created for this purpose as they dry instantly and look amazing when printed with the MK ink. These two products have been designed to allow fine art printmakers to use the MK inks to produce the highest quality watercolor and canvas prints, without losing their photography customers.

Matte Black (MK) ink is designed for Matte Papers and Photo Black (PK) ink is designed for glossy papers. The difference between these two black ink types is simple; MK prints a very dull, flat black, while PK prints a highly glossy, shiny black. Think in terms of flat black spray paint vs. glossy black spray paint. Generally speaking, the very best results and the deepest blacks for that particular substrate will be achieved by using PK with glossy substrates and MK with matte substrates. Your Epson printer manual will also provide you with a decent explanation of when they recommend using matte black ink or photo black ink.

That being said, wide-format Epson printers present a problem for those who wish to maximize their output potential by offering both matte and glossy papers as available substrate options. This is because Epson machines are built to run either the PK or the MK, rather than allowing the printmaker to switch blacks from print to print. As a result of this quandary, those who own wide-format Epson printers must make an important decision – “What type of prints do I want to be best at?” In other words, if 80% of your printmaking business is fine art on matte papers and matte canvases, naturally you will want to run your Epson with MK, which will render the highest black density on your primary substrate line. Likewise, if you are a photo lab for example and mostly reproduce photography on glossy papers, the PK is the more intelligent choice as it will render the glossiest black, which is most desirable on glossy substrates (to avoid a gloss differential).

Traditionally, most all inkjet printable substrates, matte or glossy, will “work” with the PK ink. Though the maximum black density (DMAX) would be significantly less, the print is otherwise unaffected. This is not true of the MK ink. When most glossy or semi-glossy papers are introduced to the MK ink, the ink will run and bleed, rendering the print completely unusable. Breathing Color is one of the only manufacturers to offer glossy inkjet papers and semi-gloss inkjet papers that work well with both inks. Our Vibrance Gloss, Vibrance Semi-Gloss, and Allure Rag, are all papers with a glossy surface that will print surprisingly well with the MK ink. The prints will dry instantly and will not bleed or run in the slightest and the gloss differential barely noticeable if at all. Therefore, we have created a solution for printmakers who predominantly use matte papers and canvases with MK ink, but still want the option of printing on glossy substrates. Sure, these papers will look “best” with the PK ink…but most would be pleasantly surprised by the print quality using the MK ink.


Breathing Color Support
http://www.breathingcolor.com/support

Water is the only cleanup needed for Glamour II Veneer to be removed from the foam roller and other surfaces. If the coating becomes difficult to remove from any surface, including the HVLP reservoir, 409 all purpose cleaner will disintegrate Glamour II Veneer upon contact.

Unfortunately as of 8/11/2006 Breathing Color does not offer a double-sided paper. If you are able to use a single-sided paper we would highly recommend any of our Elegance Fine Art Paper line or our Sterling Fine Art Paper line. Check back with us in 2-3 months and a double-sided paper may be available.

 

Is 100% Cotton really worth the price? After all, how much does paper composition, weight, and feel really matter when our universal objective is selling more art? 200g, 250g, 300g, 350g.We happily pay more to use a heavier weight paper, but does a paper's weight affect an art buyer's purchase or does it just senselessly raise our production costs? Would not an art buyer make the same purchase if a lighter weight paper was used to exhibit the art? In reality, art buyers are not informed of any of these subjective attributes when purchases are made in galleries. The sizable majority of fine-art printed on paper, is typically framed and behind glass, where it may only be seen by the buyer - not felt. Additionally, art buyers are rarely aware of specific media attributes, such as weight and composition, as they are not often featured or displayed along with the art in its description. So, if end consumers are not influenced by the multitude of paper attributes so heavily marketed today, then why are we? If not to sell more art, what exactly are we spending all of this money for? 

Printmakers and Self-Publishing Artists and Photographers are in the business of selling art. In order for this unique group of entrepreneurs to achieve lasting success, all of their sales and marketing strategies should serve the fundamental purpose of selling more art, at the highest possible profit margin. Output/print quality, customer service, advertising, business signage, marketing materials, etc. are examples of legitimate expenditures within the digital printmakers' most advantageous art sales strategy. Recognizing and implementing a good strategy is extremely important for small businesses, as it is a fundamental tool for increasing sales and profitability. Likewise, the ability to recognize and confront a bad strategy or one that does not increase sales, is a critically important process in facilitating long-term growth and stability for any small business. 

A recent debate among the digital printmaking community is whether the prevailing use of expensive, 100% cotton-rag base-material (hereinafter referred to as "R" for "Rag") is good strategy now that far less-expensive, "quality-equivalent" alternatives exist. The debatable question is this: If quality-equivalent alternatives to R exist and are implemented, will they or will they not retain the same sales numbers? The only way to answer this question objectively is to find a quality-equivalent alternative to R, and then compare the measurable product-attributes that contribute to each particular product's sale-ability. 

A good example of a "quality-equivalent alternative" is an archival alpha cellulose paper. Alpha cellulose is a high grade wood pulp that is acid and lignin free (hereinafter referred to as "AC"). It can typically be purchased at half the cost of R and in some cases even less than that. Because digital printmakers are recognizing the opportunity to cut their costs in half by using a quality-equivalent alternative to R, AC is rapidly gaining popularity. A specific AC paper may be considered a quality-equivalent to R, when its inkjet receptive coating can reproduce equal or better color-gamut, detail (dot precision/gain), and longevity by comparison. 

It is a measurable fact that industry-leading AC papers can reproduce color and detail as well as industry-leading R papers. The explanation for this is simple; color gamut and detail are not determined by the base material, R or AC. Rather, these properties are solely determined by the inkjet receptive coating which can be applied to any base material/substrate. In fact, a number AC papers with equal or superior color-gamut and detail to R are already widely available.

The issue of longevity is also measurable and has been documented by well-known testing facilities namely the Wilhelm Research Institute. (http://www.wilhelm-research.com/pdf/WIR_Ep9600_2003_07_26.pdf) This page on Wilhelm's website suggests that base paper materials alone, are not a clear indicator of a paper's potential lifespan. For example, Epson's alpha cellulose, which is acid free, lignin free, buffered wood-pulp fine art paper called "Epson Watercolor Paper - Radiant White (Non-R)" has permanence results of greater than 98 years under glass, where as "Epson Velvet Fine Art Paper (R)" has permanence results of only 61 years under glass, and "Epson Somerset Velvet Fine Art Paper (R)" has permanence results of 62 years under glass.

The only seemingly relevant argument made in support of R, however subjective, is that R simply feels better in your hand. As a business owner you must ask yourself, does "feel" sell more art? It is not common practice for an art buyer to sample the "feel" before making an acquisition of a favored work of art, which is usually framed behind glass and was originally created to be visually stimulating and aesthetically pleasing to the eye, not the hand. Art buyers don't care about feeling art.they care about how it looks. They care about how the art will fit into their home or office. So if the art buyer does not buy based upon "feel", why should we create art based upon this criteria?

A self-publishing fine artist/photographer who may spend $20,000/year exclusively using R could cut this in half to $10,000/year using AC. This puts an additional $10,000/year in their pocket without effecting art sales. For this reason alone, printmakers as a whole should always strive to use Non-R unless R is specifically demanded by a customer and knowledge-based persuasion is not feasible.

Remember: The artists using AC are getting the same gallery placement and dollar value for their art as the artists using the more costly R. The only difference is that one of them is making a much higher profit margin from each sale.

EXAMPLE: COST COMPARISON 

Two Products with Equivalent Color Reproduction and Dmax 

SterlingT 300g Bright White (Made from Acid and Lignin Free Alpha Cellulose) 

17" x 40' - $40.00 ($.69 per square foot)

24" x 40' - $55.00

44" x 40' - $102.00

Hahnemuhle Photo Rag 308 (Made from 100% Cotton Rag) 

17" x 39' - $99.00 ($1.65 per sq. foot) 

24" x 39' - $129.00 

44" x 39' - $249.00

Glamour 2

The corner braces on the EasyWrappe Pro bars use a friction fit and due to external environmental factors the wood may expand causing the braces to come loose. Moving the canvases from location to location may also cause this to happen. Glueing the corner braces in place helps prevent this from happening. You can also use a small screw at each end of the brace.

No, the tool will allow you to stretch any canvas regardless of size. It also works equally well for any type of stretcher bar. All that is required is to adjust your canvas size to the proper dimension for using the tool.

Yes. Once you have tightly stretched the canvas the tool is designed to lay the canvas down flat on the back of the stretcher bar. You will be able to shoot the staple in all the way, every time. You can view this in Figure 6 of the user manual.

This depends on the skill level of the user. Once you’ve become adept at using the tool you will able to stretch a 24x36 inch canvas, including the gallery wrapping, in about eight minutes.

The grasping pins in the top jaw in conjunction with the locking pliers do all the work. The weight, resulting from the solid steel construction, also helps the tool do the work for you. When the tool pivots off the extension on the bottom jaw the tool is engineered to eliminate the need for any hand strength. This is  a totally new concept for a hand held stretching device. All of the stretching pliers on the market rely on the users ability to continually squeeze down on the handles to hold the canvas. This results in tremendous hand fatigue after just a few stretches. With the Stretch Relief™, you will be able to stretch all day long and your hand at the end of the day won’t even know you’ve been working. You’ll also notice that your canvases are completely wrinkle free and tighter than ever before.

The StretchRelief™  will easily gallery wrap on any type of stretcher bar. The amount of canvas that you need extending beyond the inside of the stretcher bar is three quarters of an inch. For example: if you are stretching on a standard three-quarter inch thick stretcher bar, you add three quarters plus the width of the bar which is typically one and a half inches. To this amount you would add three quarters of an inch which would give you a total of three inches. Accounting for both sides you would double this number which would mean that your total extra canvas beyond the image size would be six inches. Using this formula for gallery wrapping an 18x24 inch frame, you would need a canvas size of 24x30 inches.

Large stretching machines not only require a substantial investment for the machine itself, but also require the use of an air compressor. In side-by-side testing, the StretchRelief™, at a fraction of the cost, has been found to give a much tighter stretch than any other stretching device on the market today. The StretchRelief™ also makes it easier to keep the image centered on the stretcher bar because you are able to monitor the positioning of the stretched image as you work.

Our clients who have used both a stretching machine and our StretchRelief™ tool have reported greater success and satisfaction with the StretchRelief™.

The StretchRelief redefines the concept of a stretching plier. Unlike conventional pliers, which have a very limited life span, the StretchRelief™’s precision machined design will give you thousands of stretches. With the StretchRelief™ you will now be able to greatly increase your production output for a relatively small investment. Breathing Color has finally solved the otherwise difficult problem of gallery wrap stretching with this amazing and cost effective tool.

No. Both canvas finishes perform the same in terms of color output, density, gamut, and saturation. The only difference is the sheen of the canvas which does not affect the color output on Crystalline.

The best way to prevent the canvas from lifting is to understand what causes this to happen. Archival glue is essential to the EasyWrappe process because it provides a permanent bond with the canvas to the stretcher bars. Since all the tension of the canvas is on the edge of the stretcher bars themselves, it's important to let the glue dry to insure a permanent bond. The adhesive strips are for alignment purposes in the beginning stages of assembly, and later to hold the edge of the canvas to the bar. There is no tension at this point and only tension will cause the canvas to lift.

The best way is to profile Crystalline with a glossy paper setting, and use the Gloss enhancer on economy mode. This will cover the black ink, which is most susceptible to scuffing.

Center braces are for EW Pro only. A 20" x 30" gallery wrap and larger should use a center brace. 20" center braces are the smallest size . If you are doing large panoramic gallery wraps, you may want to use additional center braces.

A 44" printer can produce a gallery wrap as wide as 40" for EW PRO and 41" for EW 1.25". Keep in mind that this can only be accomplished if the customer uses Borderless Printing. If they don’t have a borderless printing option on their printer (or borderless printing is not allowed on the size they are trying to achieve), then I would subtract an additional inch from the above sizes. So 39" for EW Pro and 40" for EW 1.25".

Add 1 ½" on all 4 sides (3" total) for EW 1.25", and add 2" on all 4 sides (4" total) for EW Pro. The additional ¼" on each side is for bleed that will be trimmed off. The above example would be printed at 19" x 23" for EW 1.25", and 20" x 24" for EW Pro. 

These issues are typically caused by too much coating. Since canvas needs to absorb coating eventy, too much coating creates air pockets in the canvas. When the air tries to escape, it pushes itself out either partially (air bubbles) or completely (pinholes). If you notice these issues while the print is still wet, simply go over these areas with your roller with light pressure (Timeless) or no pressure (Glamour II). If you are spraying with an HVLP gun, try going over the print with a light 2nd coat as this usually fills in the pinholes and breaks the air bubbles. This must be done while the print is wet.

Timeless needs to be applied with pressure, but reducing the amount of pressure when you finish coating is important. If you notice roller marks while the print is still wet, simply go over them with  firm pressure and reduce the pressure with each roll movement. After a few seconds, each roller mark should disappear.

This depends on a few factors (temperature, humidity), but in most cases a print coated with Timeless will be dry in about an hour. Under ideal printing/coating conditions (50-70 degrees F; 30-50% indoor humidity), Timeless can dry in about half the time.

We do have many customers using the Canon i9900 and the Epson R1800 and having success with 13" x 19" sheets of Brilliance Chromata White Canvas. Both printers work well but both printers have a hard time feeding inkjet canvas. If you are planning on printing a lot of canvas, we recommend the Epson 4800. Although the 4800 is significantly more expensive, it will not give you any problems with printing while the R1800 and i9900 might.

Glamour II Gloss / Matte

Imagine a pair of canvas pliers 60″ wide that can grip the canvas all at once. It is tight, and it typically only requires about 30-40 psi of air.

Length-wise (or vertical) canvas shrinkage is typically caused by tension created on the printer while printing with canvas rolls. This shrinkage is normally quite consistent and can be compensated for through Photoshop. Read more about how to compensate for canvas shrinkage here on our blog, The Art of Printmaking.

Yes! They do. Included in each order are the same number of corner braces as EasyWrappe or EasyWrappe Pro bars. For an order of 10 bars, you would get 10 corner braces.

Be sure that you have used the correct print settings/profile for your printer and canvas. If the wrong media type is used you could potentially print with too much ink. If there is excess ink this will only dry on the surface and when coating with a foam roller, the excess ink will be agitated and come out on the roller (and your print).

If you have insured the proper print settings were used, make sure you allowed enough time for the print to dry. Ink can come up when the roller has changed directions since it’s an abrasive move, which causes more friction. With Timeless, this is especially important since it requires pressure to apply. Always apply coating in straight lines as this will not damage the print at all. Read more about ink lifting from your print onto your roller on our blog post here.

Breathing Color manufacturers award winning fine art papers and canvas. We are not a fine art publisher. Instead, we sell to publishers who do fine art printmaking, and we also sell our products to printmakers who print on behalf of publishers.

If you are interested in submitting your images so that they can be used in our marketing samples, we are always interested in seeing new art that might be able to represent our inkjet media well. You can submit your images to info@breathingcolor.com .
Intelligence Representative

Breathing Color uses 3 different shipping methods for our customers in Hawaii. We can send your products UPS, FEDEX, or DHX. To get the cheapest shipping rate you would go with DHX which has the ability to use ocean freight. It is the cheapest but will take the most time to get to you. If you know what you want to order ahead of time, it is a good idea to place your order 3-4 weeks in advance to keep your shipping rates low as possible by going DHX ocean freight.

To receive additional information about products or shipping methods please call us on our toll free number 1-866-72-COLOR and speak with a Breathing Color Media Specialist.

If you are using the ImagePrint RIP (Raster-Image Processor) from Colorbyte, most of our inkjet canvas and fine art papers have been profiled by their technicians and are available for free download on their website. You may obtain them by clicking here

*this article will help if you are looking for Imageprint profiles, Colorbyte profiles, profiles for RIP, RIP to use with Breathing Color

If you are looking for a ICC Profile for  a particular product navigate to that products webpage on our website. You will find an ICC profile tab at the top of every Breathing Color product page that will link you directly to profiles for that product. Simply scroll through the list of profiles to find your printer and ink combination and press the download button and thats it!

If you still need help Click Here to see a video of the process.

Here are the steps you would take to manually track down the file and delete it from your hard drive:

By using these steps you are going to be able to track down every file on your hard drive ending with the file extension of .ICC

-Go to your desktop.
- Click the Start button.
-Click search -> Files or Folders -> All Files and Folders -> All of part of the filename:

and type: *.ICC

Once you have located the file on your computer, you can choose to manually delete it, by right clicking the file and selecting delete. Or you could choose to leave it on your computer and go about downloading a new profile for your media. By default Photoshop will save all profiles to your hard drive, and have the option to select which profile you want to apply each time you run a print. If you have any further questions on how to install profiles be sure to check out our instructional video on ICC profiles. It goes into great detail on exact steps you will need to take to install an ICC Profile.

Hopefully you have already watched our instructional video on "How to Apply Glamour II Veneer" which provides a very detailed look at how to apply Glamour II Veneer properly.

If you still have streaks, there are a few things you need to focus on:

(1) How much are you diluting with water? Try adding more water (at least 40%).
(2) Before adding the water to the coating, heat it in the microwave for about 8 to 10 seconds depending on how much water you are adding. The water should be above luke warm but not boiling. The heated water will help in mixing with Glamour II Veneer.
(3) When stirring the heated water and Glamour II Veneer together, stir lightly and slowly. If you try to mix them together too fast or too aggressively, it can create air bubbles that are difficult to get out of the coating once it is applied to the print. Once dried, these air bubbles are even more visible and can ruin your print.
(4) When you are first applying Glamour II Veneer to your inkjet canvas or fine art paper, be very generous with the application. Some of our customers even find success in pouring the coating directly onto the print in even lines across the whole print. Once this is done, the foam roller is then just used to spread the Glamour II Veneer around evenly.
(5) If you decide to apply Glamour II Veneer without pouring it straight onto the inkjet canvas or fine art paper and instead apply it with the foam roller directly, make sure to stay away from any bumby parts of the tray with the foam roller. When you are moving the roller around in the tray to saturate it with Glamour II Veneer, the bumbs can cause indentations in the foam which will transfer over to your prints and ultimately leave some service uncovered.
(6) Try to go over the print with the foam roller the least amount of times possible. We have found that the more times you run your foam roller over the Glamour II Veneer, the more coating you are actually taking off of the print. If you still see lines in the coating, wait until it dries to see if they go away. If you have been generous enough with the coating, the leveling agents in the Glamour II Veneer will cause the streaks to go away as it is drying.
(7) Apply the least amount of pressure possible when going over your inkjet canvas or fine art paper with the Glamour II Veneer. Pressure will cause indentations in the coating which will cause streaks once it has dried.
*this article will help if you have streaks, streaking, or lines when trying to apply Glamour II

To create the most consistent finish on your print, make sure you follow a few pointers:

1) Make sure you have about 30% water. (40% is a good dilution as well, but your gloss will slowly lessen with more water, and you can always coat twice.) A good way to prevent an inconsistent mixture of water and coating is to use hot water. Hot water will will make sure that the water is completely mixed into the coating.
2) Make sure you roll gently. The less pressure you apply on the roller, the less varnish squeezes out from the side of the rollers that create streaks.
3) Make sure you have a thick enough coating. To ensure that you have enough coating, I recommend pouring the Glamour II directly onto your print. You can pour 3-4 thin lines across your print. This also eliminates the process of having to re-dip your roller back into the tray.
4) Make sure you allow your print to sit even if you see light streaks or differences in thickness in coating. If the coat is thick enough, Glamour II will self-level.

Glamour II Veneer, like all varnishes and veneers, need to be dried before stretching or mounting. Glamour II Veneer is a water-based coating therefore drying time can vary drastically depending on where it is being used. In very dry climate, Glamour II Veneer can dry within thirty minutes. In very wet climate, Glamour II may not dry for two hours. The average drying time, however, is approximately 45 minutes to 1 hour.

The drying time for this product can also vary based upon your chosen dilution ratio. The more you dilute, the faster it will dry. If you don't dilute at all, Glamour II could take several days to dry. A minimum 20% dilution is normally required, although some of our customers have discovered their own method of applying without dilution.

Heat lamps are not suggested for drying Glamour II Veneer. In fact, cold air is the best way to dry Glamour II Veneer but be careful if you are considering a fan not to blow dust or debris onto a wet print.

Glamour II Veneer is a practically odorless water-based coating that can be applied in a closed room. It is NOT a solvent-based coating which in contrast are extremely hazardous and emit very strong odors. If you are more sensitive to chemicals and odors, or are generally concerned with health, then we would always recommend using a mask when applying any coating from any manufactuer -- just to be on the safe side.

It is definitely possible to use our Brilliance Chromata White Canvas with Mimaki printers. However, the main question is what temperature are you transferring your ink at. Brilliance Chromata White is a cotton/poly blend, so you want to check the temperature that you will be transferring at and minimize the heat if possible. The heat on some dye sublimations may warp the polyester raw material. Brilliance Chromata White Canvas like other Breathing Color Inkjet Media are designed specifically for pigment based inkjet printers, but we have had numerous customers use our media on other types of printers including a series of Mimakis. But to suggest the normal type of canvas used when printing with dye sublimation, you should use a 100% cotton canvas.

Nonetheless, the best option is always to test the canvas for yourself. We make this very easy and inexpensive to do through our heavily discounted "trial rolls" which can be quickly purchased right on our website, by clicking here http://www.breathingcolor.com/bc/catalog/index.php?cPath=303. A 17"x20' trial roll of this canvas is inexpensive and its precisely how all of our customers evaluate this canvas.

As inkjet canvas continues to gain popularity in the fine art and photographic digital printing industry, the multitude of available brands and varieties will persist and eventually flood the market in an attempt to take advantage of this increasingly desirable consumable. Current market research shows that inkjet canvas is selling three times more than inkjet paper, which historically, has never been the case. This swing in market trends suggests that art consumers are impressed by the aesthetic appeal and novelty of digitally printed inkjet canvas as it is a relatively new, yet logical medium for fine art reproduction. As an entrepreneur running a printmaking business, selecting an inkjet canvas that will be the foundation for your reputation and long-term success amid the array of possibilities, can be a daunting if not impossible undertaking. Nevertheless, it is the responsibility of the printmaker to understand and test inkjet canvas to source the highest quality to ensure sustainable-revenue and the integrity for their business. Therefore the purpose of this article is to provide printmakers with the proper tools to evaluate inkjet canvas based upon empirical data and measurable attributes; in an attempt to produce higher-quality, more-archival, and ultimately more sellable fine art inkjet canvas prints.

In order to properly evaluate inkjet canvas for your printmaking business, several criteria must be evaluated and considered. This criterion can be broken down into four primary categories: aesthetic appeal, longevity, production/business practicality, and brand association. Testing multiple brands and types of inkjet canvas is the best thing you can do for your business, your customers, and the fine art industry as a whole. That being said, the first thing you will need to do to get started is purchase sample material from several leading inkjet canvas manufacturers. Let this article be the guide or checklist to walk you though the important evaluation process.


Aesthetic Appeal

This category has been listed above all others because it is the single most important factor for evaluating your primary, house inkjet canvas. The fact is that this is the fine art industry and whether you are the artist, a gallery owner, a publisher, or a printmaker, the ultimate universal goal is to sell art. Art is predominantly sold as a result of its aesthetic appeal and the emotional derivative of the image presentation. In other words, the better your prints look, the more your artists will sell, which will naturally result in more printing business. If the artists that you print for are confident that you are reproducing their work in the most visually appealing manner and this is reflected in their print sales, you can be sure they will continue to employ your services. On the other hand, if the artist decides to shop around or happens to come in contact with an alternative printmaker who is obviously producing superior inkjet canvas prints, the artist will be gone in an instant. The only way to be certain that you are producing the most visually appealing inkjet canvas prints, is to test several different inkjet canvases for color gamut, Dmax (optical density), resolution, texture, and weight. Let us carefully consider each of these attributes individually.

Color Gamut – In this increasingly competitive industry simply offering great color reproduction is not enough. You need to offer the best color reproduction. Although precise color gamut measurement tools, such as a Colorimeter or spectrophotometer can and should be used if available, the naked eye is usually enough to distinguish a superior inkjet canvas. Print a color target, which consists of several individual color patches, on each inkjet canvas that you are evaluating. Use these targets to compare each individual color to determine which inkjet canvas produces the best color gamut. It is also recommended to print the same, colorful image on each inkjet canvas and see which produces the most vibrant colors.

Dmax - Dmax is a measure of maximum density of an images color but more specifically its black density. Again, the most precise measurements can be taken with a densitometer, but the naked eye will suffice if this equipment is not available to you. When discussing paper and inks, Dmax is commonly defined as the blackest black possible. Black density is arguably the most discernable characteristic in evaluating the quality of ink, paper, inkjet canvas, and even printmakers themselves. Therefore achieving the blackest black possible should be the most critical concern for every fine art printmaker. In this increasingly competitive industry, as with color gamut, offering great blacks is simply not enough. You need to offer the blackest blacks possible.

Resolution - This refers to the smallest discernable dots or pixels, commonly measured as dpi or dots per inch. In relation to fine art reproduction, it is a measurement of the fineness of detail in a printed image. Resolution is a crucially important attribute because without fineness and detail, image quality is compromised. No matter how accurate your colors are or how dense your black may be if the image appears blurry up close instead of clean and crisp, you will have significantly decreased your chances of selling that print as it will negatively affect its overall perceived value. This will inhibit the artist from obtaining true market-value for his/her work, which will cause you the printmaker to lose business to a competitor who uses a inkjet canvas with superior resolution. It should be noted that inkjet canvases with excessive texture can also compromise resolution and should be avoided. The drastic peaks and valleys in the inkjet canvas texture can cause ink to bleed, or run, which will blur minute aspects of a printed image.

Texture The optimal texture of inkjet canvas is one that will exude a natural inkjet canvas look, without compromising resolution or reducing the amount of viewable angels in which the art can be appreciated. The latter is caused by any type of glossy finish on a highly textured inkjet canvas. The result is a sparkling affect caused by light reflecting off of the glossy peaks and valleys of the textured inkjet canvas. Sparkling inkjet canvas prints no longer take on the qualities of an original painting which causes art consumers to perceive them as cheap reproductions. In an industry driven by quality and aesthetic appeal, cheap reproductions won't sell and will be detrimental to a printmakers reputation.

All in all, even if a inkjet canvas is a clear leader in color gamut, dmax, and resolution, it may have excessive texture which alone can compromise quality. Therefore, printmakers should test for excessive texture. This can be accomplished in two ways. First, print images with extreme detail and look for a lack of image cleanliness and crispness up close. Second, use a semi-glossy or glossy post-print protective coating and look for sparkling when light reflects off the coated surface. It is important to keep in mind that texture is primarily a subjective attribute of which everyone will have a differing opinion. As a printmaker, it is wise to advise your clients to make a texture decision based upon objective information that will improve the sale-ability of their prints rather than attempt to source unique inkjet canvas textures to appeal to every artist's personal preference.

Thickness & Weight - These are completely subjective attributes that do not contribute to the visual appeal or the sale-ability of any inkjet canvas print. For their own reasons, usually related to their artist/customers, some printmakers have a tendency to place value on how a inkjet canvas feels. To the artist or printmaker (not the art consumer) perceived value can be associated with a heavier weight and thicker inkjet canvas. The fact is that it costs more to manufacture a inkjet canvas with a heavier weight and thickness, but neither weight nor thickness has any contribution to the visual appeal or longevity of a inkjet canvas print. The higher cost is simply not justified.

Once stretched, framed, and hanging on the wall in an art gallery nobody is touching or feeling the finished inkjet canvas print. These consumers have absolutely no way of determining the initial weight, thickness, or feel of the inkjet canvas. Therefore, these attributes are totally worthless unless of course they somehow affect your production process. For example, an excessively thin inkjet canvas might tear when stretching over frames. An excessively thick inkjet canvas might not feed through your printer. An excessively heavy inkjet canvas might senselessly raise your costs, lower your profit margins and in turn decrease your market competitiveness as a printmaker. Therefore, using a inkjet canvas because you like how it feels or how heavy it is, is just a disorganization of business priorities. Unless your customer requires a specific inkjet canvas weight or thickness, these two attributes should be considered your lowest priority. Generally it is a plus to have a heavier, thicker inkjet canvas but should not influence your inkjet canvas evaluation.


Longevity

Longevity refers to how long a inkjet canvas print will last before it begins to noticeably deteriorate. This is an absolutely critical element in determining which inkjet canvas to use for your business. In order to appropriately label yourself a fine art printmaker, you must produce fine art prints. By definition, fine art prints are expected to maintain their constitution for several decades. Fine art prints that deteriorate in the short-term maintain almost no value and were in fact, never fine art prints to begin with. Thus, longevity must be taken into consideration in every printmaker's long-term business strategy as selling deteriorating prints will no doubt contribute to the inevitable demise of your future business in the fine art industry.

Unfortunately, unbiased, objective longevity testing information about each inkjet canvas is not readily available. Therefore, the only real way to be confident that this longevity component is fulfilled is by choosing a reputable manufacturer with a worldwide recognized brand. These manufacturers have proven their ability to deliver and support fine art quality products to the masses. They also guarantee their products. Rest assured that if any problem does arise, most of them will be right there to fix the problem and/or reimburse you. A reputable printmaking business must have this guarantee where the manufacturer holds the risk. Printmakers should use these worldwide brands to their advantage by communicating their stability benefits to their own customer base. Nevertheless, it is important to understand exactly what characteristics affect the longevity of your inkjet canvas prints.

Acidity - One primary determinant of longevity is the acidic content within a inkjet canvas. The introduction of acid to a inkjet canvas print will cause it to quickly yellow and deteriorate. Finding a inkjet canvas that is completely acid-free and ph-neutral is extremely important in preserving the longevity of your prints. Most inkjet canvas suppliers will boast an acid-free product but in actuality they are referring only to the raw inkjet canvas material, conveniently leaving out the acidic content of the inkjet receptive coating applied on top, which completely negate the initial claim. In order to maximize and ensure longevity, printmakers should therefore make sure that a inkjet canvas has both an acid-free raw inkjet canvas base and an acid-free inkjet receptive coating.

Optical Brightener Additives (OBAs) - These are artificial brightening agents commonly used in many inkjet substrates to make them appear brighter or whiter than they actually are. According to the most recognized inkjet print permanence testing organization, the Wilhelm Research Institute, OBAs should be avoided because they compromise the longevity of fine art prints by causing yellowing, and by causing the colors of a print appear different under differing lighting conditions.

Color management guru David Coons of Artscans explains the difficulties in using OBA's:

Our main problems with OBAs are with reproducing original art with bright or pastel yellows. Since typical OBA coated media doesn't reflect warmer wavelengths as strongly as conventional natural white watercolor papers, it's often impossible to accurately reproduce many warm pastel colors such as light yellow.

Optical brighteners create an appearance of 'brightness' by inducing blue fluorescence in the presence of UV-rich light sources such as sunlight, metal halide, and fluorescent lamps. Papers coated with these brighteners tend to fight yellow inks in particular because of their bluish cast. Color management systems can help preserve relative color differences, but will never be able to overcome these physical limitations.

In June 2005 worldwide inkjet canvas manufacturer Breathing Color, Inc. out of Orange, California (www.breathingcolor.com) released the first ever optical-brightener free inkjet canvas and since, the product segment has grown in popularity at a very fast pace within the USA and is spreading to other regions of the world. Printmakers using this product are taking advantage of the credibility and competitive positioning it offers.

Water-Resistance - History has proven that inkjet canvases without sufficient water-resistance are fragile and increasingly susceptible to damage by humans and the environment (humidity). Although they can be protected and enhanced with solvent-based coatings, generally it is best to avoid them simply because they are more of a liability and increase longevity risk. Solvent-based coatings, which are mandatory with non-water-resistant inkjet canvases, also have a tendency to chip, crack, and flake over time and/or during the stretching process. Some manufacturers who have not yet been able to develop a truly water-resistant inkjet canvas have resorted to marketing semi-water-resistant inkjet canvases as water-resistant. Beware of these.

Although there is no documented industry standard for water-resistance, printmakers can easily test this on their own. Run a print and allow it 24 hours to dry. Once the ink has completely dried simply poor a glass of water over the print. If a inkjet canvas is not water-resistant, the ink will run and smear immediately. Some highly water-resistant inkjet canvases can withstand this test even immediately after printing. Printmakers using truly water-resistant inkjet canvases also enjoy the added benefit of the ability to use a water-based post-print coating, which in most cases is much more durable than the solvent-based alternatives.

Post-Print Protective Coatings - Commonly sold in gloss, semi-gloss, and matte options, these post-print protective coatings are most commonly used to preserve and protect inkjet canvas prints from abrasion and harmful ultraviolet light. They are also used to enhance color and increase the visual appeal of a inkjet canvas print.

Printmakers should evaluate a coating for the following: First, it must sufficiently protect a inkjet canvas print from abrasion. This means that if anyone were to accidentally touch, scuff, hit, or spill anything onto the printed surface – nothing will happen. The integrity and value of the print is essentially preserved. Second, a giclee coating must protect a inkjet canvas from harmful ultraviolet light. Although it should always be avoided, this means that the inkjet canvas should not fade or yellow if it were to be in direct or indirect sunlight for extended periods of time. Third, a coating should be able to enhance color in order to increase the visual appeal of the inkjet canvas print. Fourth, a coating should not provide any sort of yellow cast over the image. This is a negative side effect that compromises the integrity and value of a inkjet canvas print. This yellow casting issue can be tested by simply comparing a coated and uncoated piece of unprinted inkjet canvas. If the coated portion appears yellow, then this coating is working against the quality of your reproductions and should be substituted with a more reputable product from a fine art manufacturer. Finally, the coating should not crack when stretching over frames. If the giclee coating cracks you are unnecessarily decreasing the quality of your inkjet canvas reproduction. All reputable inkjet canvas manufacturers have information on coatings that is compatible with their products. Selling prints that crack when stretched is unacceptable in this industry where public information about coating compatibility is readily available for all printmakers.

Only use fine art giclee coatings from reputable manufacturers that produce products specifically for the fine art market -- not to be confused with coatings made to protect signage or other surfaces and are erroneously marketed by many suppliers as fine art coating substitutes. Beware of these untested products with no history or track record.


Production

Now that we have discussed the most critical aspects of selecting an inkjet canvas in aesthetic appeal and longevity, let's shift our focus production, more specifically, how does this inkjet canvas work with your operational flow?  Production can and should be shaped around a high-quality, archival inkjet canvas, rather than finding a inkjet canvas that works with your current production flow. I say this because many printmakers are forced to make this decision when they encounter a problem with a inkjet canvas or supplier.  Do I select a new inkjet canvas that works well with my current system and flow or do I select the best inkjet canvas I can find and adjust my production flow around it?  Though the latter may be more difficult in the beginning, this decision will no doubt pay off in the long term. Nevertheless, there are some inkjet canvas characteristics that are more suitable for every printmaker's production flow and should be sought after. Consistency - Roll to roll consistency is a vitally important issue for every printmaker, especially for high production environments. A lack of consistency can cost your business a lot of time and money in defective prints and material waste. It can even cost you customers.

Any inkjet canvas manufacturer can tell you that inkjet canvas manufacturing is by far the most difficult inkjet product to consistently produce. No inkjet canvas is perfect, and at some point in time every printmaker will receive faulty inkjet canvas that they must return. For the most part, some inkjet canvases tend to be more consistent than others and these are the ones you need to find. If you choose a inkjet canvas that is very consistent your business and customers will enjoy smooth production without hassles. This is where the actual make-up of a inkjet canvas becomes relevant.

The two most common fine art inkjet canvas options are 100% cotton inkjet canvases and poly/cotton blend inkjet canvases. 100% cotton inkjet canvases used to be the first choice amongst the majority of fine art printmakers because of its perceived higher quality and natural look and feel. These days, after years of manufacturing inconsistencies, 100% cotton inkjet canvas is avoided by the majority of the market and hardly any manufacturers produce them anymore. The inconsistencies include shrinking (when coated or when subject to a high humidity environment), expanding (long after being stretched and framed, causing the print to sag and appear off balance on one side), and the presence of visible, black cotton seeds. These black cotton seeds end up in the middle of prints and can make them look dirty or defective. They also have a tendency to fall off, leaving white voids in your print. Collectively, it is for all these reasons that 100% cotton inkjet canvases are not widely used by fine art printmakers any longer.

Instead, consistent and high quality polyester-cotton blend inkjet canvases (or polycotton inkjet canvases) have become by far the most widely used inkjet canvas base in the fine art industry. Poly/cotton inkjet canvases are of not inferior in print or longevity quality, but do lack the natural look or feel of the 100% cotton inkjet canvases. However, polycotton inkjet canvases are typically free of cotton seeds and do not shrink or sag after long periods of time. Ultimately, the crucial importance of roll-to-roll consistency has fueled the demand for polycotton inkjet canvases over the years. Until consistent 100% cotton inkjet canvases are introduced, these poly/cottons will continue to drive the market.

It is important to understand that roll-to-roll consistency of polycotton inkjet canvases also vary from manufacturer to manufacturer. Roll-to-roll consistency really comes down to a given manufacturer's quality control. Larger companies always have better quality control because of how costly this process is. There are always defects in inkjet canvas productions and the primary role of quality control is to isolate the defects so that they do not reach the marketplace. Some manufacturers do this better than others. As a general rule, it is better to stick with a larger manufacturer, provided of course that they have the best product with regard to aesthetic appeal and longevity.

Stretch-Ability - As stated earlier, a finished, coated inkjet canvas print that cracks or tears when stretching over frames significantly loses value and also appears cheap in the eyes of consumers. To avoid this, printmakers can test a inkjet canvas by coating piece of it, allowing it 24 hours to dry, folding it backwards, completely in half, and then firmly pressing the fold to make a crease. If the inkjet canvas does not crack in the creased area, it will most likely not crack or tear when stretched. Nonetheless, the only way to be sure is by sending a print to your framer (unless you frame yourself) who can provide reliable feedback.

Cost - This is the final determinant of a printmakers market competitiveness. Specifically, what level of quality does he/she deliver relative to the asking price. In order to be the most competitive, a printmaker must use the highest quality product available at the lowest price, but not if price compromises quality. In this industry, price does not always determine quality. This is because the distribution methods of manufacturers are the primary determinant of the end user price. Most manufacturers use regional distributors who in turn mark up the cost of the product and sell it to end users. This is the traditional distribution method of this industry. Contrastingly, a few select worldwide manufacturers sell direct to the market, eliminate the regional distributor, and are therefore able to offer fiercely competitive pricing directly to the end-users. By researching manufacturers and their pricing structures, printmakers can gain a good understanding of what each has to offer. The goal is to maximize quality and minimize cost.

It is also important to consider buying inkjet canvas or other substrates in bulk. Many manufacturers and distributors will offer volume discounts on inkjet canvas. Therefore, businesses can drastically lower their overhead, simply by buying in bulk and stocking their best selling products. Buying in bulk will also lower overall shipping costs by ordering once every 3 months for example as opposed to once per week. Bulk-buying will also ensure that you have sufficient inventory to promptly begin and deliver urgent print jobs.


Brand Association

As if it hasn't already been stressed enough, printmakers need to know as much as possible about the manufacturer before they start printing on their inkjet canvas. First, printmakers need to distinguish between a true manufacturer and a private-labeler.

Private-labelers are companies who conceal the original manufacturer by applying their own names to a product. Due to the exponential growth of this industry there is an overwhelming abundance of private-labelers. Every single regional inkjet supplier who brands their own inkjet canvas is private labeling. If they tell you otherwise, they are not being honest with you. It costs millions upon millions of dollars, not to mention rare expertise, to produce and support even one high quality fine art inkjet canvas, which is why very few manufacturers really exist.

Many re-branded inkjet canvases on the market over the past few years have been produced at a very low cost from unreliable inkjet canvas mills in countries where labor costs are low (i.e. China). The problem with these manufacturers is that they lack the financial wherewithal to support a fine art inkjet canvas and will turn their back on the first sign of a problem. They have no brand, they are not interested in building a brand and they have nothing to lose. A manufacturer without extreme care of a brand in the delicate fine art industry is a very bad sign and should be avoided at all costs.

The less-informed, poor inkjet canvas choices made by regional inkjet suppliers and their printmaking customers have plagued the local markets at times. A recent issue involved a particular inkjet canvas that was being marketed and sold within Australia as a fine art inkjet canvas of the highest quality. To the dismay of its users, this inkjet canvas began to turn yellow on the walls of its buyers only eight months after it was printed and even coated. This resulted in massive returns, lawsuits, bankruptcies, and ruined the credibility of many of the businesses involved. Normally a bad inkjet canvas choice will simply result in a loss of competitive positioning, but the point of this example is to stress how bad it can get.

The only way to be certain is to choose a inkjet canvas that comes from a widely recognized worldwide brand with a public reputation. You can confirm this by visiting the manufacturer's web site and reading about their company. Read about their products, their values, and their mission. Read their press releases and see if and how long they have been covered by the media. If posted, read their customer testimonials and do further research on the reputation and history of these customers. Then, contact the company directly and speak to a representative who should be interested in starting a relationship with you. Make a small purchase of a sample kit or anything else that will allow you to evaluate how the Company delivers. Take note of the marketing materials they provide, the look of their packaging, etc. Gather some influential industry publications and look at the company's advertisements. There are far less than ten worldwide inkjet canvas manufacturers and through this research they will be easily distinguishable.

Reputable printmakers simply do not even waste their time even trying inkjet canvases that do not come from long-standing worldwide brands who have been in the industry for years. By conducting some research one can conclude that the more reputable the printmaker, the more likely it is that they strictly use long-standing worldwide brands. Chances are, they have learned the hard way at some point in time.


Conclusion

In this rapidly expanding industry, printmakers lose or capture business daily as a direct result of customers demanding individual inkjet canvas attributes. The higher volume the customer is, the more sophisticated and knowledgeable they will be, and the more significance each inkjet canvas attribute will have to them. Higher volume customers learn faster and earlier than the rest of the market, but eventually, the rest of the market catches up. Therefore, the only long-term strategy is to master knowledge of these attributes and offer the best inkjet canvas that the industry has to offer. The best inkjet canvas, in and of itself, will always be a subjective analysis but by prioritizing these attributes one can interject a certain level of objectivity into it that customers will understand and trust.

Teddy Blah of MFA Talon Graphics (www.mfatalon.com) of El Segundo, CA says MFA Talon Graphics has been a one of the largest worldwide fine art printmakers for nearly 20 years now, and to uphold our leading reputation, our substrate decision making process from inkjet canvases to papers is extremely intricate and involves many people. The ultimate decision comes from an accumulation of years and years of learning experiences, coupled with constant tests and evaluations of new products, to discover what will continue our reputation and propel MFA Talon Graphics to increasing levels of quality. We know where to find the best materials, we know how to test and evaluate them, and we only use what is logically determined by us to be the absolute best that we can offer our customers. It is a never ending process and by treating it this way we improve our quality every single day.

Finding the best inkjet canvas for your business will result from an accumulation of inkjet canvas knowledge as brought forth by this article along with your continual research and pursuit of maximum quality. We hope that printmakers all over the world save this article and use the information presented within it, to better their businesses and to better the fine art printmaking industry as a whole.

Here is the proper procedure:

1. Load the canvas into the printer.

2. On the front panel, choose “Roll” and “Fine Art Paper -> Fine Art Paper>250 g/m2”.

3. Using the HP Printer Utility, open the “Color Center” tab.

4. Click on “Create and Install ICC Profile”.

5. Enable the following: “Add a new paper” and “Print target and create ICC profile”. Click “Next”.

6. In “Paper Name:”, type a suitable name for the paper.

7. In “Paper Type:”, choose “Fine Art Material -> Thick Fine Art Paper (>250 g/m2)”. Click “Next”.

8. A custom paper will be created.

9. On the next screen, you will see the profile name for the new custom paper. CLICK “Cancel”.

10. Click on “Manage Papers”.

11. Click on “Change Printing Properties”.

12. Choose the custom paper you just added.

13. UNCHECK THE CUTTER OPTION. Click “Apply”. Click “OK”.

14. Click “OK” then “Close”.

15. Click on “Calibrate Your Printer” and run a calibration for your new custom paper.

16. When the calibration is done, click on “Create and Install ICC Profile” and create a profile for your new custom paper.

If you would like to speak with a Breathing Color media specialist about printer settings, please feel free to give us a call on our toll free number: 1-866-72-COLOR.  You can also speak with Breathing Color support representatives by sending an email to: support@breathingcolor.com
 

HP Printers

A. 90 psi @ 2CFM or greater.  This can easily be obtained with a typical “pancake” compressor that can be purchased at Home Depot or Lowes. Here is a link to just a few. <click here>

No, however, it does make for a cleaner more refined look. Take a look at the video demonstration on the "details" tab.

Yes, they are extremely reliable. We chose to use pneumatic components specifically for their reliability and accessibility.

Amplis Foto is the Breathing Color distributor in Canada.   

Amplis Foto
22 Telson Rd., Markham
Ontario L3R 1E5
Canada
(905) 477 4111 x 118
bc@amplis.com

Inkjet Canvas

A. 90 psi @ 2CFM or greater.  This can easily be obtained with a typical “pancake” compressor that can be purchased at Home Depot or Lowes. Here is a link to just a few. <click here>

No, however, it does make for a cleaner more refined look. Take a look at the video demonstration on the "details" tab.

A. No, but we recommend using a long-nose staple gun for access.  We currently sell (2) different models of long-nose staple guns, the Fasco F1B8016LN and the Omer 8016LN.

Yes, they are extremely reliable. We chose to use pneumatic components specifically for their reliability and accessibility.

We designed this machine for that very purpose, however, it is also capable of producing regular stretches.

First, you start with a canvas print that has been stretched with stretcher bars--like our 1.25" EasyWrappe or 1.5" stretcher bars. We recommend using double-sided tape or hook and loop tape on the inside of the frame to mount your print. The advantage of mounting the print this way is that you can easily reposition the art in the frame to get it centered. Also, you can easily swap the artwork out occassionally if you desire.

This depends on the skill level of the user. Once you’ve become adept at using the tool you will able to stretch a 24x36 inch canvas, including the gallery wrapping, in about eight minutes.

This depends on a few factors (temperature, humidity), but in most cases a print coated with Timeless will be dry in about an hour. Under ideal printing/coating conditions (50-70 degrees F; 30-50% indoor humidity), Timeless can dry in about half the time.

Epson 7800 / 9800/4800 Ink K3 Cyan 220ml Overview

Epson UltraChrome K3™ ink, used on the Epson 9800, Epson 7800, Epson 4800, can produce archival prints with amazing color fidelity, gloss level, and scratch resistance, while providing consistently stable colors that significantly outperform lesser ink technologies. This breakthrough ink technology also makes it the perfect choice for professional neutral and toned black and white prints with higher density levels and virtually no metamerism. Epson ink. Its value is apparent each time you print. What you save in dollars with third party (or “compatible”) ink cartridges, you could sacrifice in quality and performance. In independent testing, Epson ink cartridges produce superior image quality, longer print life, greater reliability and unbeatable value versus third party ink cartridges. But don’t take our word for it. Industry experts and independent research prove not only that “you get what you pay for,” but with genuine Epson ink cartridges, you get substantially more. Superior Image Quality For prints as vivid as your memories. Epson ink cartridges are engineered to deliver stable, long-lasting, photographic quality. A recent PC World magazine article said, "We encountered third-party inks that produced poor quality prints." The article showed that none of the third party ink cartridges tested were able to deliver the consistent quality of Epson ink cartridges for photo printing. Longer Print Life For brilliant prints that last and last. Permanence, or how long a displayed print will last before noticeable fading, is where third party ink cartridges really pale in comparison to Epson ink cartridges. In a recent study, Henry Wilhelm, a leading authority on photo longevity, projected Epson inks to last for up to 92 years*, while third party inks printed on the same paper were projected to last no more than a year. Greater Reliability Because we value your time as much as you do. Epson ink cartridges deliver reliable and optimal print performance because they are designed to work with Epson printers. All ink jet printers use user-initiated cleaning cycles to clear any printhead clogs that may occur. With Epson printers, third party inks can clog the printhead nozzles more frequently, leading to more cleaning cycles. According to a study conducted by Torrey Pines Research, Epson ink cartridges require up to 25 times fewer user-initiated cleaning cycles than third party ink cartridges.* That adds up to considerable savings in time. Unbeatable Value More prints per cartridge. Torrey Pines Research stated that Epson ink cartridges "consistently outperformed third party ink brands" when it comes to the number of prints per cartridge. In fact, the study showed that the Epson ink cartridges produce up to 114 more pages per black ink cartridge and 19 more pages per color cartridge.* The number of pages printed using Epson ink cartridges is up to 30% more than the third party ink cartridges. Bottom line - more prints, more value. *Torrey Pines Research, test of Epson genuine ink vs. third party ink

Like the older prints by Epson such as the Epson Stylus Pro 9800 and Epson Stylus Pro 7800, these new printers - the Epson 11880, Epson 9880, and Epson 7880 printers have 8-channel printheads. However, these new inkjet printers incorporate the new MicoPiezo AMC Printhead technology. These new heads are quite remarkable in that they have a new ink repelling coating technology which reduces head clogging and by simplifying the need for cleaning these new printheads are especially useful for dusty or linty papers, such as fine art papers or canvas. The printheads also offer more advanced Active Meniscus Control (AMC). Active Meniscus Control is intended to significantly improve dot regularity and dot placement. Although Active Meniscus Control technology was used in prior printer models (this is the third generation), the performance in the Epson 11880 is reported to be stunningly more than 100 times as accurate when compared to a model such as the Epson 9800.

The Canon imagePROGRAF iPF8000, 44" inch printer takes the next step in redefining large format printing. The new iPF8000 is the ideal solution for any color professional looking for impressive, full-bleed color output, strength in paper handling and exceptional speed in output. Advanced professional features such as automatic clogged nozzle detection and compensation for reliability, 330ml and 700ml selectable ink capacity sizes for versatility, a large backlit LCD panel for ease of use, and ink usage tracking for accountability are all part of the new iPF8000 to satisfy every color professional's large format printing needs. The 12-color pigment ink system with LUCIA inks was designed to expand the spectrum of color for environments from professional photographers to graphic designers to print for pays. The 12-ink colors enable the iPF8000 printer to deliver outstanding color and neutral and stable grayscales. The Canon L-COA processor, which is dedicated to the imagePROGRAF, is designed to optimize the best quality output at the highest possible speeds. Vivid breathtaking, long lasting prints are achieved by combining Canon's advanced technological achievements.

The many built in features that make this printer easy to use and maintain, are the driving force behind this powerful printer. With the printer's unique ability to print in unprecedented quality and speed along with the multiple media handling options and software suite, make the iPF8000 the ideal solution for all types of professionals. The iPF8000 is designed for reliability, simplicity, productivity and above all quality.

  • 12-Color Pigment Ink System - New LUCIA inks expand the range of color reproduction by providing a wide color gamut.
  • Automatic Switching Between Black Inks - Utilizes automatic switching between Regular Black and Matte Black Ink, helping to eliminate wasted ink and time of swapping out ink tanks.
  • New Print Head System - Dual print head system with a total of 30,720 nozzles.
  • Borderless Printing - 4-sided edge to edge printing, only with roll media.
  • Non-firing Detection and Compensation Function - When clogged or non-firing nozzles are detected; print head cleaning cycle is automatically executed. If the nozzle remains obstructed, the iPF8000 will automatically compensate by rerouting the ink to functioning nozzles.

All of the fine art paper and inkjet canvas made by Breathing Color is specifically designed for Epson's Ultrachrome and K3 Inks. Every Epson printer size is also supported with compatible product sizes such as 13", 17", 24", 36" and 44" width rolls. In addition, each product has a custom profile for all Epson printers to ensure color accuracy and ease of use.

In addition to industry-leading inkjet canvas and inkjet papers, Breathing Color also manufactures high-end graphics and signage material known as the Picturesque Collection. Among this collection is our Repositionable Adhesive Vinyl which is well suited for stickers, posters, and decals, due to its easily removable adhesive backing and its outdoor durability. 17" Trial Rolls of Repositionable Adhesive Vinyl are available for testing.

Another very popular alternative to inkjet canvas and fine art paper is our Pure Silk. Exactly like it sounds, this product is 100% Pure Silk, which can be printed directly onto using a pigment-based inkjet printer. It comes on a roll with a rigid removable backing. Our Pure Silk is water-resistant and should be handled just like any other silk. In other words, do not machine wash it, but dry cleaning is acceptable. 17" Trial Rolls of Pure Silk are available for testing.

Because inkjet canvas is a natural woven textile, it is susceptible to climate and environmental conditions.  Cold conditions can cause the canvas to become more rigid, especially coupled with the low humidity levels many regions see during the winter months.  However, cold storage shouldn’t do any harm to the canvas as long as the rolls remain inside their original packaging and are allowed to acclimate to the printing environment for 24-48 hours before being used.  Printmakers should use a first in, first out method to rotate the inventory in their print room

If you are using the ImagePrint RIP (Raster-Image Processor) from Colorbyte, most of our inkjet canvas and fine art papers have been profiled by their technicians and are available for free download on their website. You may obtain them by clicking here

*this article will help if you are looking for Imageprint profiles, Colorbyte profiles, profiles for RIP, RIP to use with Breathing Color

Here are the steps you would take to manually track down the file and delete it from your hard drive:

By using these steps you are going to be able to track down every file on your hard drive ending with the file extension of .ICC

-Go to your desktop.
- Click the Start button.
-Click search -> Files or Folders -> All Files and Folders -> All of part of the filename:

and type: *.ICC

Once you have located the file on your computer, you can choose to manually delete it, by right clicking the file and selecting delete. Or you could choose to leave it on your computer and go about downloading a new profile for your media. By default Photoshop will save all profiles to your hard drive, and have the option to select which profile you want to apply each time you run a print. If you have any further questions on how to install profiles be sure to check out our instructional video on ICC profiles. It goes into great detail on exact steps you will need to take to install an ICC Profile.

Glamour II Veneer giclee coating can be rolled on with a dense foam roller, sprayed on with an HVLP gun (50% dilution), or used with a roll coating machine (50% dilution).

When rolling Glamour II Veneer you are going to want to dilute it down 25%-30% with warm distilled water.  You can apply the glamour directly to the print, and then immediately start to roll the Glamour II onto the canvas.  Do not apply pressure to the roller, and make multiple passes in opposite directions.  A good way to know if you are almost done rolling, is to listen for the "sticky" sound of the Glamour II.  This means that the coating has been worked into the canvas and is starting to dry.  The more time you spend working the Glamour II into the canvas, the faster it will dry and the better your print will look.  Please allow at least a full 24 hours for your print to dry.

Glamour II Veneer is a practically odorless water-based coating that can be applied in a closed room. It is NOT a solvent-based coating which in contrast are extremely hazardous and emit very strong odors. If you are more sensitive to chemicals and odors, or are generally concerned with health, then we would always recommend using a mask when applying any coating from any manufactuer -- just to be on the safe side.

Optimal drying conditions for our Glamour II would be 65 degress or higher and 60% relative humidity or lower. Also keep in mind it is always a good idea to have a low dust drying enviroment. It is not a good idea to have any type of fan on while drying varnish. If you have a high ceiling or cannot control the temperature at night, when out of the sudio/office, space heaters can be used to boost the average temperature and should not effect the integrity of the product.

Breathing Color recently introduced Aura Decor 280 smooth to its product line while at the same time ending production of Sterling 300. Aura Decor 280 is our newest Alpha Cellulose smooth paper primary introduced to eliminate any previous issues experianced with Sterling 300. The main diffrence between the papers is the weight or thickness of the papers. Being an alpha cellulous paper Sterling 300 inherently has a heavy 'curl' that was difficult to deal with. The introduction of  Aura Decor 280 in a slightly lighter weight (20gsm less) was aimed at solving this curl issue while maintaining the same great print quality and price as Sterling 300. Â

 

Finally connected the dots on how to best print Vibrance Gloss with Matte Black Ink to avoid flat black areas.  I just returned from Dan Margulis' Applied Color Theory workshop in San Diego. He taught me how to adjust an image for proper shadow detail for prepress applications which is to work in CMYK color space and curve the inks in the shadow areas to carry no more than 300 percent ink. The formula that insures that shadows will not plug in CMYK is  80, 70, 70, 70.  When I adjusted a clients shadows for 80,70,70,70 the image printed without the annoying flat black areas that occur at higher ink saturations. I'm finding that several of my photography clients like to super saturate their images and their black ink levels are measuring at all the CMYK levels are measuring near or at 100.

International Ordering

Print Permanence Ratings are longevity tests performed by companies who have the equipment required to conduct accelerated light exposure tests, dark aging tests, and humidity tests. The purpose of the testing is to determine the life expectancy of a digital inkjet canvas or inkjet paper print before "deterioration" occurs. Common examples of deterioration include yellowing, staining, or fading.

To the dismay of their users (and trusting believers in the Print Permanence Rating), various inkjet papers with high print permanence ratings failed to meet their expectation and instead began deteriorating within months and in some cases days after being printed. How could this happen? It's very simple, actually. Once you begin scrutinizing the longevity testing method that gave the high rating, multiple flaws are evident. For example, while factors such as light might be tested for, other common environmental factors are left out, such as exposure to certain chemicals in carpets, stretcher bars, wrapping paper (we hope you don't wrap your finished prints in brown Kraft paper), boxes (such as the box your roll of paper or sheets came in), etc., etc. etc. In other words, Print Permancence Ratings are created "in a bubble". Unfortunately, printmakers dont have that luxury.

While it's true that scrutiny of these testing methods discovered a series of flaws in the process of developing and publishing a Print Permanence Rating, the purpose of this article is not to scrutinize these flaws nor witch hunt the messenger of the Print Permanence Rating. That would be a waste of time. Instead, the purpose of this article is to expose Print Permanence Ratings for what they really are -- a marketing tool. Should a product not live up to its rating, users need to understand that they will receive absolutely no recourse in some cases, not even a refund for the price of the roll or box of sheets purchased. Ratings are no guarantee of longevity. So first and foremost, dont be fooled into thinking that they provide any sort of financial guarantee to you or your business.

Every Print Permanence Rating is accompanied by a liability disclaimer from the product's manufacturer. Here is a common example:

Actual print stability and longevity will vary according to image, display conditions, light intensity, humidity, atmospheric conditions, ink, and post printing treatments. (Manufacturer name removed) does not guarantee stability or longevity. For maximum print life, display all prints under glass or lamination or properly store them.

You can find these disclaimers with every manufacturer or OEM in this industry. The bottom line is that Print Permanence Ratings are a marketing tool that encourage confident use but in reality provide absolutely no meat and potatoes for the consumer. Why? Because when your prints turn yellow, fade, stain, or deteriorate in any other way, and when your customers want their money back, after you spent thousands on ink and countless hours in production -- you simply won't be getting any recourse. Read the disclaimer again -- once you buy the product, you assume your own risk. So the next time your local supplier or any other supplier of inkjet goods tells you about a Print Permanence Rating or a guarantee, try qualifying it. Ask them to tell you exactly what recourse you will receive from them, or from the manufacturer, should the product fail to live up to its rating. You might be surprised to see just how many people in this industry are still fooled into thinking that some guarantee actually exists -- even the suppliers.

So the next obvious question is: Why won't canvas, paper, or ink manufacturers give us consumers a guarantee on longevity? The problem with providing a guarantee on any inkjet print is that there are just too many uncontrollable factors involved that can contribute to the deterioration of a print. As seen in the disclaimer posted above, examples of such factors include display conditions, exposure to UV light and its intensity, humidity, atmospheric conditions (let's be honest, this could include just about anything), ink, and post printing treatments. Other examples include exposure to certain chemicals in carpets, stretcher bars, wrapping paper (we hope you don't wrap your finished prints in brown Kraft paper), boxes (such as the box your roll of paper or sheets came in), etc. A manufacturer simply cannot control such a myriad of factors a consumer could so likely and even unknowingly expose a print to.

Given such numerous factors and potential hazards, it is easy to understand how Print Permanence Ratings in reality are created in a bubble. Print Permanence Ratings are created in the perfect environment, in a controlled laboratory, with only select external conditions (such as light and humidity) -- and most importantly, the end goal of achieving the highest rating possible. The bottom line is that you will never achieve this rating in the real world, so don't be surprised when you don't. A Print Permanence Rating certainly doesn't tell you what to expect should you introduce other external conditions, such as exposure and/or contact with acidic cardboard or paper (a very common occurrence, unfortunately) for unspecified periods of time, or any other potential unmentioned pitfall. They simply don't address the consequences one can expect when such factors are introduced. So just because a product has a print permanence rating of say 90 years, in reality, history has proven that such a product could deteriorate within months or even days. It has happened before, and it will happen again.

All in all, the subject on Print Permanence Ratings ultimately brings us to question what consumers can do, or what factors they can control in order to maximize the longevity potential of their own inkjet prints. We will answer that question in the next article.

Once the print has completely dried, you should have no problem rolling it up.  Keep in mind that when the print is exposed to extremely hot or humid temperatures, it may have a tendency to soften and stick to itself.  For this reason it is always recommended to protect each print with a sheet of an acid-free barrier paper.

Jade, by PureG

That's no problem! There are no height limitations when using the Gallery Stretcher.

For borderless printing, the Epson print engine enlarges the image size slightly (about 5 percent or a bit less) to ensure that the image is not printed with any white edges due to paper misalignment. You can minimize the clipping by resizing your image to actual paper size (e.g., 13" x 19", 4" x 6"), and then setting Print with Preview to center the image and print it at 96% of actual size. The clipping dialog still comes up (it will whenever you are printing in the printer's defined margins), but tell it OK. You can try using 95% if there is still too much clipping.

In this Article we will take a closer look at the Epson 11880 Vivid Magenta Inkset. These are brand new ink cartridges designed for these new Epson Stylus Pro Series printers only. It is first important to note that these vivid magenta inkset cartridges are NOT compatible with older printer models such as the Epson Stylus Pro 9800 and Epson Stylus Pro 7800 . Although they will work, they are reported to ruin the print heads within a short period of time such as 6 months. Althought this information has not been confirmed by a third party Epson user as of the date of this writing, it should be noted. Also note that we are only referring to the two vivid magenta cartirdges; not the other colors which can be used interchangeably with other Epson Stylus Pro Series printer models.

Epson UltraChrome/K3 Ink Technology with Vivid Magenta * High-density pigments for an extremely wide color gamut * New formulation of Magenta pigments for extreme blues and purples * Professional print permanence ratings for truly sellable quality prints * High-gloss Microcrystal Encapsulation technology for reduced gloss differential * Superior scratch resistance from improved pigment and resin chemistry * Color is stable immediately after printing - no short-term color shifting * Produces a black density up to 2.55 with an L* value of 2.9*

Like the older prints by Epson such as the Epson Stylus Pro 9800 and Epson Stylus Pro 7800, these new printers - the Epson 11880, Epson 9880, and Epson 7880 printers have 8-channel printheads. However, these new inkjet printers incorporate the new MicoPiezo AMC Printhead technology. These new heads are quite remarkable in that they have a new ink repelling coating technology which reduces head clogging and by simplifying the need for cleaning these new printheads are especially useful for dusty or linty papers, such as fine art papers or canvas. The printheads also offer more advanced Active Meniscus Control (AMC). Active Meniscus Control is intended to significantly improve dot regularity and dot placement. Although Active Meniscus Control technology was used in prior printer models (this is the third generation), the performance in the Epson 11880 is reported to be stunningly more than 100 times as accurate when compared to a model such as the Epson 9800.

If you hare having problems printing Brilliance Chromata White with either the Epson 7600 or 9600 reguarding the "Reload Paper" dialog, there are settings that may need to be changed to fix this problem.

  • If you have the Platen Gap set to WIDEST change it to WIDE.
  • Edit the setting on the printer to turn off "Paper Size Check" - PPR SIZE CHK = OFF
  • Wihin your printer driver configure the "Paper Suction" to -1

Lyve

We consider the Art Peel a product designed for "short term" display. A couple of years maximum, with ideal conditions. It's a fabric so will suffer the normal wear and tear on the wall unless it's laminated. Lamination will usually help with dust, moisture, and UV exposure just like any other media. 

It does not compare, but not for the reasons you might think. The Fastframe can only stretch up to a 41″ x 41″ frame. Each size requires a different platen…at a sizable cost. The machine is designed to be operated by (1) person to produce one piece at a time which means that you would need to have several machines operating to produce the 4000-6000 stretches some of our customers are producing a month. One of our customers stretches 4500 canvas a month with (3) machines and (5) people. The Fastframe sells for about $150,000 and the proprietary stretcher cartridges are very expensive. Finally, there is no provision to cut the excess canvas around the corners, with our machine this can be done in-place.

If your prints are going magenta it could be a number of reasons: 

1. It could be a clogged head, in which case you should run a head cleaning on your printer. 
2. Double check that you are selecting "No Color Adjustment" if not the software will try to color correct the image. 
3. The file the image is in may have a magenta cast. 
4. Lastly you may have a profile that is not working for your printer. If this is the case please print the ICC targets you can download from our web site and send them to use. We can custom create a profile for you free of cost.

Lyve

If your prints are going magenta it could be a number of reasons: 

1. It could be a clogged head, in which case you should run a head cleaning on your printer. 
2. Double check that you are selecting "No Color Adjustment" if not the software will try to color correct the image. 
3. The file the image is in may have a magenta cast. 
4. Lastly you may have a profile that is not working for your printer. If this is the case please print the ICC targets you can download from our web site and send them to use. We can custom create a profile for you free of cost.

Mint, by PureG

That's no problem! There are no height limitations when using the Gallery Stretcher.

For borderless printing, the Epson print engine enlarges the image size slightly (about 5 percent or a bit less) to ensure that the image is not printed with any white edges due to paper misalignment. You can minimize the clipping by resizing your image to actual paper size (e.g., 13" x 19", 4" x 6"), and then setting Print with Preview to center the image and print it at 96% of actual size. The clipping dialog still comes up (it will whenever you are printing in the printer's defined margins), but tell it OK. You can try using 95% if there is still too much clipping.

In this Article we will take a closer look at the Epson 11880 Vivid Magenta Inkset. These are brand new ink cartridges designed for these new Epson Stylus Pro Series printers only. It is first important to note that these vivid magenta inkset cartridges are NOT compatible with older printer models such as the Epson Stylus Pro 9800 and Epson Stylus Pro 7800 . Although they will work, they are reported to ruin the print heads within a short period of time such as 6 months. Althought this information has not been confirmed by a third party Epson user as of the date of this writing, it should be noted. Also note that we are only referring to the two vivid magenta cartirdges; not the other colors which can be used interchangeably with other Epson Stylus Pro Series printer models.

Epson UltraChrome/K3 Ink Technology with Vivid Magenta * High-density pigments for an extremely wide color gamut * New formulation of Magenta pigments for extreme blues and purples * Professional print permanence ratings for truly sellable quality prints * High-gloss Microcrystal Encapsulation technology for reduced gloss differential * Superior scratch resistance from improved pigment and resin chemistry * Color is stable immediately after printing - no short-term color shifting * Produces a black density up to 2.55 with an L* value of 2.9*

Like the older prints by Epson such as the Epson Stylus Pro 9800 and Epson Stylus Pro 7800, these new printers - the Epson 11880, Epson 9880, and Epson 7880 printers have 8-channel printheads. However, these new inkjet printers incorporate the new MicoPiezo AMC Printhead technology. These new heads are quite remarkable in that they have a new ink repelling coating technology which reduces head clogging and by simplifying the need for cleaning these new printheads are especially useful for dusty or linty papers, such as fine art papers or canvas. The printheads also offer more advanced Active Meniscus Control (AMC). Active Meniscus Control is intended to significantly improve dot regularity and dot placement. Although Active Meniscus Control technology was used in prior printer models (this is the third generation), the performance in the Epson 11880 is reported to be stunningly more than 100 times as accurate when compared to a model such as the Epson 9800.

If you hare having problems printing Brilliance Chromata White with either the Epson 7600 or 9600 reguarding the "Reload Paper" dialog, there are settings that may need to be changed to fix this problem.

  • If you have the Platen Gap set to WIDEST change it to WIDE.
  • Edit the setting on the printer to turn off "Paper Size Check" - PPR SIZE CHK = OFF
  • Wihin your printer driver configure the "Paper Suction" to -1

Online Purchasing

A. 90 psi @ 2CFM or greater.  This can easily be obtained with a typical “pancake” compressor that can be purchased at Home Depot or Lowes. Here is a link to just a few. <click here>

A. No, but we recommend using a long-nose staple gun for access.  We currently sell (2) different models of long-nose staple guns, the Fasco F1B8016LN and the Omer 8016LN.

Canvas floater frames are a unique way to display your 1.25" or 1.5"-deep stretched canvas prints. Your print sits centered inside the frame (using double-sided tape or hook and loop tape for easy swapping or repositioning of your art) appearing to float! The inside of each frame has a black finish to make it easy to replicate the "float" effect that artists used to try to achieve using black tape around the edges of their canvas prints.

Center braces are for EW Pro only. A 20" x 30" gallery wrap and larger should use a center brace. 20" center braces are the smallest size . If you are doing large panoramic gallery wraps, you may want to use additional center braces.

Brilliance Chromata White: CANVAS MATTE

Elegance Velvet Platinum: TEXTURED WATERCOLOR PAPER

Optica One: WATERCOLOR PAPER

Air bubbles can be caused by a variety of things.  Breathing Color has tested every single possible variable to the foam rolling process of coating. Most of the time bubbles in the print are caused by "under rolling."  You want to cover your print by going in multiple directions, not just one. The canvas has to "drink" the coating in.  If you see bubbles at the start of your coating process, it is the canvas sucking the coating into the print. The desired dilution ratio of water to coating is 30% water 70% coating.  There has been cases of bubbles forming from over diluted coating. Please allow the canvas 24 hours of dry time as well. After 24 hours when you come back to your print, youl will notice that the bubbles have disappeared.

As long as you are using a water-resistant inkjet canvas or fine art paper with pigment inks you should have no problems with using Glamour II Veneer liquid lamination. Glamour II Veneer is a water based liquid lamination coating that is practically odorless and is easily applied with a foam roller. We also have instructional videos on our website which guide you through the liquid lamination (coating) process.

Once the print has completely dried, you should have no problem rolling it up.  Keep in mind that when the print is exposed to extremely hot or humid temperatures, it may have a tendency to soften and stick to itself.  For this reason it is always recommended to protect each print with a sheet of an acid-free barrier paper.

It is always recommended to first seal your inkjet canvas prints with Glamour II or Timeless before attempting to hand embellish. You can also use Glamour II as a Texturizing Gel.

Optica One

That's no problem! There are no height limitations when using the Gallery Stretcher.

For borderless printing, the Epson print engine enlarges the image size slightly (about 5 percent or a bit less) to ensure that the image is not printed with any white edges due to paper misalignment. You can minimize the clipping by resizing your image to actual paper size (e.g., 13" x 19", 4" x 6"), and then setting Print with Preview to center the image and print it at 96% of actual size. The clipping dialog still comes up (it will whenever you are printing in the printer's defined margins), but tell it OK. You can try using 95% if there is still too much clipping.

In this Article we will take a closer look at the Epson 11880 Vivid Magenta Inkset. These are brand new ink cartridges designed for these new Epson Stylus Pro Series printers only. It is first important to note that these vivid magenta inkset cartridges are NOT compatible with older printer models such as the Epson Stylus Pro 9800 and Epson Stylus Pro 7800 . Although they will work, they are reported to ruin the print heads within a short period of time such as 6 months. Althought this information has not been confirmed by a third party Epson user as of the date of this writing, it should be noted. Also note that we are only referring to the two vivid magenta cartirdges; not the other colors which can be used interchangeably with other Epson Stylus Pro Series printer models.

Epson UltraChrome/K3 Ink Technology with Vivid Magenta * High-density pigments for an extremely wide color gamut * New formulation of Magenta pigments for extreme blues and purples * Professional print permanence ratings for truly sellable quality prints * High-gloss Microcrystal Encapsulation technology for reduced gloss differential * Superior scratch resistance from improved pigment and resin chemistry * Color is stable immediately after printing - no short-term color shifting * Produces a black density up to 2.55 with an L* value of 2.9*

Like the older prints by Epson such as the Epson Stylus Pro 9800 and Epson Stylus Pro 7800, these new printers - the Epson 11880, Epson 9880, and Epson 7880 printers have 8-channel printheads. However, these new inkjet printers incorporate the new MicoPiezo AMC Printhead technology. These new heads are quite remarkable in that they have a new ink repelling coating technology which reduces head clogging and by simplifying the need for cleaning these new printheads are especially useful for dusty or linty papers, such as fine art papers or canvas. The printheads also offer more advanced Active Meniscus Control (AMC). Active Meniscus Control is intended to significantly improve dot regularity and dot placement. Although Active Meniscus Control technology was used in prior printer models (this is the third generation), the performance in the Epson 11880 is reported to be stunningly more than 100 times as accurate when compared to a model such as the Epson 9800.

If you hare having problems printing Brilliance Chromata White with either the Epson 7600 or 9600 reguarding the "Reload Paper" dialog, there are settings that may need to be changed to fix this problem.

  • If you have the Platen Gap set to WIDEST change it to WIDE.
  • Edit the setting on the printer to turn off "Paper Size Check" - PPR SIZE CHK = OFF
  • Wihin your printer driver configure the "Paper Suction" to -1

Photo Paper

A. 90 psi @ 2CFM or greater.  This can easily be obtained with a typical “pancake” compressor that can be purchased at Home Depot or Lowes. Here is a link to just a few. <click here>

A. No, but we recommend using a long-nose staple gun for access.  We currently sell (2) different models of long-nose staple guns, the Fasco F1B8016LN and the Omer 8016LN.

Yes, they are extremely reliable. We chose to use pneumatic components specifically for their reliability and accessibility.

Once your print is in the frame, there is approximately 1/4" between the edge of the wrap and the inside of the frame. This space is helps give the illusion of the floating print!

Epson 7800 / 9800/4800 Ink K3 Cyan 220ml Overview

Epson UltraChrome K3™ ink, used on the Epson 9800, Epson 7800, Epson 4800, can produce archival prints with amazing color fidelity, gloss level, and scratch resistance, while providing consistently stable colors that significantly outperform lesser ink technologies. This breakthrough ink technology also makes it the perfect choice for professional neutral and toned black and white prints with higher density levels and virtually no metamerism. Epson ink. Its value is apparent each time you print. What you save in dollars with third party (or “compatible”) ink cartridges, you could sacrifice in quality and performance. In independent testing, Epson ink cartridges produce superior image quality, longer print life, greater reliability and unbeatable value versus third party ink cartridges. But don’t take our word for it. Industry experts and independent research prove not only that “you get what you pay for,” but with genuine Epson ink cartridges, you get substantially more. Superior Image Quality For prints as vivid as your memories. Epson ink cartridges are engineered to deliver stable, long-lasting, photographic quality. A recent PC World magazine article said, "We encountered third-party inks that produced poor quality prints." The article showed that none of the third party ink cartridges tested were able to deliver the consistent quality of Epson ink cartridges for photo printing. Longer Print Life For brilliant prints that last and last. Permanence, or how long a displayed print will last before noticeable fading, is where third party ink cartridges really pale in comparison to Epson ink cartridges. In a recent study, Henry Wilhelm, a leading authority on photo longevity, projected Epson inks to last for up to 92 years*, while third party inks printed on the same paper were projected to last no more than a year. Greater Reliability Because we value your time as much as you do. Epson ink cartridges deliver reliable and optimal print performance because they are designed to work with Epson printers. All ink jet printers use user-initiated cleaning cycles to clear any printhead clogs that may occur. With Epson printers, third party inks can clog the printhead nozzles more frequently, leading to more cleaning cycles. According to a study conducted by Torrey Pines Research, Epson ink cartridges require up to 25 times fewer user-initiated cleaning cycles than third party ink cartridges.* That adds up to considerable savings in time. Unbeatable Value More prints per cartridge. Torrey Pines Research stated that Epson ink cartridges "consistently outperformed third party ink brands" when it comes to the number of prints per cartridge. In fact, the study showed that the Epson ink cartridges produce up to 114 more pages per black ink cartridge and 19 more pages per color cartridge.* The number of pages printed using Epson ink cartridges is up to 30% more than the third party ink cartridges. Bottom line - more prints, more value. *Torrey Pines Research, test of Epson genuine ink vs. third party ink

Word on the street is that the Epson 11880 60 inch model will differ slightly than the smaller Epson 9880 44 inch, Epson 7880 24 inch, and Epson 4880 17 inch models. Apparrently it will offer a higher quality print and possibly faster printing speed, therefore offering the wide format printer user added value in paying for the more expensive Epson 11880 printer.

Since the Epson 9880, Epson 7880, and Epson 4880 model printers have not reached the marketplace yet, they have not been evaluated and compared extensively. As soon as this information is available we will update this page. Check back periodically for more information on the new Epson Stylus Pro series inkjet printers.

Poster Paper

A. 90 psi @ 2CFM or greater.  This can easily be obtained with a typical “pancake” compressor that can be purchased at Home Depot or Lowes. Here is a link to just a few. <click here>

A. No, but we recommend using a long-nose staple gun for access.  We currently sell (2) different models of long-nose staple guns, the Fasco F1B8016LN and the Omer 8016LN.

Yes, they are extremely reliable. We chose to use pneumatic components specifically for their reliability and accessibility.

Epson 7800 / 9800/4800 Ink K3 Cyan 220ml Overview

Epson UltraChrome K3™ ink, used on the Epson 9800, Epson 7800, Epson 4800, can produce archival prints with amazing color fidelity, gloss level, and scratch resistance, while providing consistently stable colors that significantly outperform lesser ink technologies. This breakthrough ink technology also makes it the perfect choice for professional neutral and toned black and white prints with higher density levels and virtually no metamerism. Epson ink. Its value is apparent each time you print. What you save in dollars with third party (or “compatible”) ink cartridges, you could sacrifice in quality and performance. In independent testing, Epson ink cartridges produce superior image quality, longer print life, greater reliability and unbeatable value versus third party ink cartridges. But don’t take our word for it. Industry experts and independent research prove not only that “you get what you pay for,” but with genuine Epson ink cartridges, you get substantially more. Superior Image Quality For prints as vivid as your memories. Epson ink cartridges are engineered to deliver stable, long-lasting, photographic quality. A recent PC World magazine article said, "We encountered third-party inks that produced poor quality prints." The article showed that none of the third party ink cartridges tested were able to deliver the consistent quality of Epson ink cartridges for photo printing. Longer Print Life For brilliant prints that last and last. Permanence, or how long a displayed print will last before noticeable fading, is where third party ink cartridges really pale in comparison to Epson ink cartridges. In a recent study, Henry Wilhelm, a leading authority on photo longevity, projected Epson inks to last for up to 92 years*, while third party inks printed on the same paper were projected to last no more than a year. Greater Reliability Because we value your time as much as you do. Epson ink cartridges deliver reliable and optimal print performance because they are designed to work with Epson printers. All ink jet printers use user-initiated cleaning cycles to clear any printhead clogs that may occur. With Epson printers, third party inks can clog the printhead nozzles more frequently, leading to more cleaning cycles. According to a study conducted by Torrey Pines Research, Epson ink cartridges require up to 25 times fewer user-initiated cleaning cycles than third party ink cartridges.* That adds up to considerable savings in time. Unbeatable Value More prints per cartridge. Torrey Pines Research stated that Epson ink cartridges "consistently outperformed third party ink brands" when it comes to the number of prints per cartridge. In fact, the study showed that the Epson ink cartridges produce up to 114 more pages per black ink cartridge and 19 more pages per color cartridge.* The number of pages printed using Epson ink cartridges is up to 30% more than the third party ink cartridges. Bottom line - more prints, more value. *Torrey Pines Research, test of Epson genuine ink vs. third party ink

Profiles / Color Management

We designed the Gallery Stretcher with the Tensador in-mind. We knew that it had a lot of nice features but we concluded that it was on the wrong plane, especially, for high-production workshops.

A. 90 psi @ 2CFM or greater.  This can easily be obtained with a typical “pancake” compressor that can be purchased at Home Depot or Lowes. Here is a link to just a few. <click here>

No, however, it does make for a cleaner more refined look. Take a look at the video demonstration on the "details" tab.

Yes, they are extremely reliable. We chose to use pneumatic components specifically for their reliability and accessibility.

The frame size you choose will be equal to the finished, stretched size of your print. For example, if you purchase an 8"x10" floater frame, this will fit a print that has been stretched with 8"x10" stretcher bars. The face (front) of your stretched print will be equal to the size of the frame that you purchase.

When shipping, paper sleeves can rub or scuff the surface of the media. By using a small strip of tape to hold the roll tight instead, we can avoid this abrasion. The strip of tape used here can sometimes leave residue behind on the media, so we compensate for any media loss by adding a few extra feet to each of these rolls.

Yes, StretchRelief™ works equally well for standard stretches. Simply move the stretcher bar over to the edge of your working table and shoot the staple in the side.

The StretchRelief™  will easily gallery wrap on any type of stretcher bar. The amount of canvas that you need extending beyond the inside of the stretcher bar is three quarters of an inch. For example: if you are stretching on a standard three-quarter inch thick stretcher bar, you add three quarters plus the width of the bar which is typically one and a half inches. To this amount you would add three quarters of an inch which would give you a total of three inches. Accounting for both sides you would double this number which would mean that your total extra canvas beyond the image size would be six inches. Using this formula for gallery wrapping an 18x24 inch frame, you would need a canvas size of 24x30 inches.

Canvas absorbs a little more ink then a standard photo paper (where ink dries on top of the inkjet receptive coating, thus requiring less ink). Canvas needs to outgas before you laminate it. Outgassing involves water evaporating from the ink during the drying process. This is why it is also important not to stack prints until they are completely dry. After completing your print, allow up to 24 hours before coating to allow outgassing to complete. Read our blog post here for more about how long you should let you prints dry before coating, and why?

If you hare having problems printing Brilliance Chromata White with either the Epson 7600 or 9600 reguarding the "Reload Paper" dialog, there are settings that may need to be changed to fix this problem.

  • If you have the Platen Gap set to WIDEST change it to WIDE.
  • Edit the setting on the printer to turn off "Paper Size Check" - PPR SIZE CHK = OFF
  • Wihin your printer driver configure the "Paper Suction" to -1

Since the Epson 4000 printer has the capability to print both photo or matte black inks, the instructions you see on the page are for matte black inks. We recommend using matte black ink settings for Breathing Color products. If you have any other questions regarding profile installation or setup, please send an email to support@breathingcolor.com

Canon has set a new standard in the way digital prints are produced with the all-new next generation pigment ink imagePROGRAF iPF5000 17" printer. The iPF5000 printer is designed to satisfy the most critical printing needs of all types of digital artists. This extraordinary printer ties in the new LUCIA pigment ink with innovative hardware to produce brilliant eye-catching output that's ready in minutes. The 12 color pigment ink system provides superior color stability and print longevity while dramatically expanding the color gamut. With the combination of the two gray and two black inks, the iPF5000 produces crisp, neutral monochrome output. The new L-COA print controller intelligently processes print data and directs the two high-precision, high-density (30,720 nozzles) print heads to lay down ink with unprecedented speed and accuracy.

Along with the printer's unique ability to print in unprecedented quality and speed is the multiple media handling options and software suite, which make the iPF5000 the ideal solution for all types of professionals. Stunning quality prints can be created right out-of-the-box, with software that is just as innovative as the printer itself, such as PosterArtist, Digital Photo Print Pro, Print Plug-in for Digital Photo Professional and Print Plug-in for Adobe® Photoshop®.

Features:

  • 12 Color Pigment Ink System - New LUCIA inks expand the range of color reproduction by providing a wide color gamut.
  • Automatic Switching Between Black Inks - utilizes automatic switching between Regular Black and Matte Black Ink, eliminating wasted ink and time of swapping out ink tanks.
  • New Print Head System - dual print head system with a total of 30,720 nozzles.
  • Multiple Media Options - standard media cassette tray, a rear manual feed, a front straight path manual feed and an optional roll feed unit for printing long length output.
  • Borderless Printing - 4 sided edge to edge printing, only with roll media.
  • Non-firing Detection and Compensation Function - when clogged or non-firing nozzles are detected; print head cleaning cycle is automatically executed. If the nozzle remains obstructed, the iPF5000 will automatically compensate by rerouting the ink to functioning nozzles.

Glamour II Veneer giclee coating has been known to work with various artist paints for embellishment, however it is always recommended that you perform a test with a small scrap of coated canvas to avoid a negative reaction.

The printable side of our Elegance Velvet Fine Art Paper is the slightly smoother, less textured side of the paper. This is the side that has the ink jet receptive coating on it.

How to Install ICC Profiles on Windows Vista:

1. Save the .ICC profile to your desktop.

2. Right-Click the ICC profile and select: "Install Profile."

3. Right-Click the ICC profile again, and select: "Copy."

*Now you are going to paste this .ICC file into a Windows file directory.  Here is where you will need to to go:

- Click: "My Computer."
- Open your Hard Drive (C:)
- Open the folder labeled: "Windows."
- Open the folder labeled: "System 32."
- Open the folder labeled: "Spool."
- Open the folder labeled: "Drivers."
- Open the folder labeled: "Color."
- Paste the .ICC profile into the "Color" folder.

[ C:\Windows\system32\spool\drivers\color ]

*If you have Adobe Photoshop running, close it and restart the application. Once Adobe Photoshop is restarted, the new profile(s) will appear in the proper dialogs. If you still do not see your .ICC profiles please contact Breathing Color at: 1-866-722-6567.

Adobe Photoshop automatically places the profiles in the directory:

C:\WINDOWS\system32\spool\drivers\color

RollerFoam Kit

These issues are typically caused by too much coating. Since canvas needs to absorb coating eventy, too much coating creates air pockets in the canvas. When the air tries to escape, it pushes itself out either partially (air bubbles) or completely (pinholes). If you notice these issues while the print is still wet, simply go over these areas with your roller with light pressure (Timeless) or no pressure (Glamour II). If you are spraying with an HVLP gun, try going over the print with a light 2nd coat as this usually fills in the pinholes and breaks the air bubbles. This must be done while the print is wet.

Samples

For testing and evaluation, we offer short trial rolls of all of our inkjet canvas, inkjet fine art paper, inkjet decor paper, and inkjet signage products that are sold at cost. Typically, trial rolls are 17"x20 feet. The purpose for this is to allow our customers to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of our products, cost effectively. There are several steps that should be taken when testing any new digital substrate for your printing business.

1. The substrate should be tested with several different images to be sure the product performs well with everything image-type that you intend to use it for (try a portrait photograph, a vibrant fine art print, a black & white piece, etc.). Make sure you are selecting images that are fairly different from one another with respect to color and tonal gradation for a thorough evaluation.

2. Show a few of your most important customers a print of their own work on the media you are testing. Maybe provide an example of your current media to illustrate a comparison. Explain the physical and archival attributes of the new substrate and the reasons that you are considering a switch. It is the printmakers job to educate their artists about all things printing-related, especially media.

3. Trial rolls provide enough media to create custom profiles, for those who are capable. Breathing Color also offers a free custom profile service, which requires approximately two square feet of printed media.

4. It is important to have enough media to leave a margin for error in case the first attempt had not been printed correctly (print settings, profile, platen gap, etc.).

5. For inkjet canvas: coating, stretching, and hand embellishment should also be tested.

In addition to trial rolls, Breathing Color offers a complimentary sample pack, which includes printed samples of all available fine art products, with any order (limit one per customer). These sample packs can be purchased separately for $19.95.

We do not recommend storying Glamour II Veneer after it has been diluted. Only dilute as much as you will need when you are coating. Storing Glamour II Veneer after diluting can cause it to separate and harden.

Shipping/Packaging Issues

A. No, but we recommend using a long-nose staple gun for access.  We currently sell (2) different models of long-nose staple guns, the Fasco F1B8016LN and the Omer 8016LN.

We designed this machine for that very purpose, however, it is also capable of producing regular stretches.

No, this isn't a do-it-yourself stretching solution. For that,  you should check out our EasyWrappe or EasyWrappe Pro stretching system.

For our Stretcher Sticks, you will need a cutting machine to miter the bars down to the size you need, as well as an underpinning machine to join the corners and make the frame.  

Canvas floater frames are a unique way to display your 1.25" or 1.5"-deep stretched canvas prints. Your print sits centered inside the frame (using double-sided tape or hook and loop tape for easy swapping or repositioning of your art) appearing to float! The inside of each frame has a black finish to make it easy to replicate the "float" effect that artists used to try to achieve using black tape around the edges of their canvas prints.

Signage

A. 90 psi @ 2CFM or greater.  This can easily be obtained with a typical “pancake” compressor that can be purchased at Home Depot or Lowes. Here is a link to just a few. <click here>

A. No, but we recommend using a long-nose staple gun for access.  We currently sell (2) different models of long-nose staple guns, the Fasco F1B8016LN and the Omer 8016LN.

Yes, they are extremely reliable. We chose to use pneumatic components specifically for their reliability and accessibility.

Epson 7800 / 9800/4800 Ink K3 Cyan 220ml Overview

Epson UltraChrome K3™ ink, used on the Epson 9800, Epson 7800, Epson 4800, can produce archival prints with amazing color fidelity, gloss level, and scratch resistance, while providing consistently stable colors that significantly outperform lesser ink technologies. This breakthrough ink technology also makes it the perfect choice for professional neutral and toned black and white prints with higher density levels and virtually no metamerism. Epson ink. Its value is apparent each time you print. What you save in dollars with third party (or “compatible”) ink cartridges, you could sacrifice in quality and performance. In independent testing, Epson ink cartridges produce superior image quality, longer print life, greater reliability and unbeatable value versus third party ink cartridges. But don’t take our word for it. Industry experts and independent research prove not only that “you get what you pay for,” but with genuine Epson ink cartridges, you get substantially more. Superior Image Quality For prints as vivid as your memories. Epson ink cartridges are engineered to deliver stable, long-lasting, photographic quality. A recent PC World magazine article said, "We encountered third-party inks that produced poor quality prints." The article showed that none of the third party ink cartridges tested were able to deliver the consistent quality of Epson ink cartridges for photo printing. Longer Print Life For brilliant prints that last and last. Permanence, or how long a displayed print will last before noticeable fading, is where third party ink cartridges really pale in comparison to Epson ink cartridges. In a recent study, Henry Wilhelm, a leading authority on photo longevity, projected Epson inks to last for up to 92 years*, while third party inks printed on the same paper were projected to last no more than a year. Greater Reliability Because we value your time as much as you do. Epson ink cartridges deliver reliable and optimal print performance because they are designed to work with Epson printers. All ink jet printers use user-initiated cleaning cycles to clear any printhead clogs that may occur. With Epson printers, third party inks can clog the printhead nozzles more frequently, leading to more cleaning cycles. According to a study conducted by Torrey Pines Research, Epson ink cartridges require up to 25 times fewer user-initiated cleaning cycles than third party ink cartridges.* That adds up to considerable savings in time. Unbeatable Value More prints per cartridge. Torrey Pines Research stated that Epson ink cartridges "consistently outperformed third party ink brands" when it comes to the number of prints per cartridge. In fact, the study showed that the Epson ink cartridges produce up to 114 more pages per black ink cartridge and 19 more pages per color cartridge.* The number of pages printed using Epson ink cartridges is up to 30% more than the third party ink cartridges. Bottom line - more prints, more value. *Torrey Pines Research, test of Epson genuine ink vs. third party ink

Breathing Color uses 3 different shipping methods for our customers in Hawaii. We can send your products UPS, FEDEX, or DHX. To get the cheapest shipping rate you would go with DHX which has the ability to use ocean freight. It is the cheapest but will take the most time to get to you. If you know what you want to order ahead of time, it is a good idea to place your order 3-4 weeks in advance to keep your shipping rates low as possible by going DHX ocean freight.

To receive additional information about products or shipping methods please call us on our toll free number 1-866-72-COLOR and speak with a Breathing Color Media Specialist.

Specialty Paper

A. 90 psi @ 2CFM or greater.  This can easily be obtained with a typical “pancake” compressor that can be purchased at Home Depot or Lowes. Here is a link to just a few. <click here>

A. No, but we recommend using a long-nose staple gun for access.  We currently sell (2) different models of long-nose staple guns, the Fasco F1B8016LN and the Omer 8016LN.

Yes, they are extremely reliable. We chose to use pneumatic components specifically for their reliability and accessibility.

Large stretching machines not only require a substantial investment for the machine itself, but also require the use of an air compressor. In side-by-side testing, the StretchRelief™, at a fraction of the cost, has been found to give a much tighter stretch than any other stretching device on the market today. The StretchRelief™ also makes it easier to keep the image centered on the stretcher bar because you are able to monitor the positioning of the stretched image as you work.

Our clients who have used both a stretching machine and our StretchRelief™ tool have reported greater success and satisfaction with the StretchRelief™.

The StretchRelief redefines the concept of a stretching plier. Unlike conventional pliers, which have a very limited life span, the StretchRelief™’s precision machined design will give you thousands of stretches. With the StretchRelief™ you will now be able to greatly increase your production output for a relatively small investment. Breathing Color has finally solved the otherwise difficult problem of gallery wrap stretching with this amazing and cost effective tool.

Epson 7800 / 9800/4800 Ink K3 Cyan 220ml Overview

Epson UltraChrome K3™ ink, used on the Epson 9800, Epson 7800, Epson 4800, can produce archival prints with amazing color fidelity, gloss level, and scratch resistance, while providing consistently stable colors that significantly outperform lesser ink technologies. This breakthrough ink technology also makes it the perfect choice for professional neutral and toned black and white prints with higher density levels and virtually no metamerism. Epson ink. Its value is apparent each time you print. What you save in dollars with third party (or “compatible”) ink cartridges, you could sacrifice in quality and performance. In independent testing, Epson ink cartridges produce superior image quality, longer print life, greater reliability and unbeatable value versus third party ink cartridges. But don’t take our word for it. Industry experts and independent research prove not only that “you get what you pay for,” but with genuine Epson ink cartridges, you get substantially more. Superior Image Quality For prints as vivid as your memories. Epson ink cartridges are engineered to deliver stable, long-lasting, photographic quality. A recent PC World magazine article said, "We encountered third-party inks that produced poor quality prints." The article showed that none of the third party ink cartridges tested were able to deliver the consistent quality of Epson ink cartridges for photo printing. Longer Print Life For brilliant prints that last and last. Permanence, or how long a displayed print will last before noticeable fading, is where third party ink cartridges really pale in comparison to Epson ink cartridges. In a recent study, Henry Wilhelm, a leading authority on photo longevity, projected Epson inks to last for up to 92 years*, while third party inks printed on the same paper were projected to last no more than a year. Greater Reliability Because we value your time as much as you do. Epson ink cartridges deliver reliable and optimal print performance because they are designed to work with Epson printers. All ink jet printers use user-initiated cleaning cycles to clear any printhead clogs that may occur. With Epson printers, third party inks can clog the printhead nozzles more frequently, leading to more cleaning cycles. According to a study conducted by Torrey Pines Research, Epson ink cartridges require up to 25 times fewer user-initiated cleaning cycles than third party ink cartridges.* That adds up to considerable savings in time. Unbeatable Value More prints per cartridge. Torrey Pines Research stated that Epson ink cartridges "consistently outperformed third party ink brands" when it comes to the number of prints per cartridge. In fact, the study showed that the Epson ink cartridges produce up to 114 more pages per black ink cartridge and 19 more pages per color cartridge.* The number of pages printed using Epson ink cartridges is up to 30% more than the third party ink cartridges. Bottom line - more prints, more value. *Torrey Pines Research, test of Epson genuine ink vs. third party ink

For borderless printing, the Epson print engine enlarges the image size slightly (about 5 percent or a bit less) to ensure that the image is not printed with any white edges due to paper misalignment. You can minimize the clipping by resizing your image to actual paper size (e.g., 13" x 19", 4" x 6"), and then setting Print with Preview to center the image and print it at 96% of actual size. The clipping dialog still comes up (it will whenever you are printing in the printer's defined margins), but tell it OK. You can try using 95% if there is still too much clipping.

You may have downloaded the wrong ICC Profile.  If you have downloaded profiles for an Epson printer using MATTE black ink, and the "Watercolor Paper Radiant White" setting is unavailable, then you must be using PHOTO black ink.  If you follow the link below it will bring you to the index of all Epson ICC profiles.

http://www.breathingcolor.com/support/index.php?_m=downloads&_a=view&parentcategoryid=1&pcid=0&nav=0

Depending on what type of ink you are printing with, (matte or photo black ink) will determine what media type you will choose.  Make sure you know this information before you download an ICC profile.

Sterling Rag, Natural White

Yes, they are extremely reliable. We chose to use pneumatic components specifically for their reliability and accessibility.

Large stretching machines not only require a substantial investment for the machine itself, but also require the use of an air compressor. In side-by-side testing, the StretchRelief™, at a fraction of the cost, has been found to give a much tighter stretch than any other stretching device on the market today. The StretchRelief™ also makes it easier to keep the image centered on the stretcher bar because you are able to monitor the positioning of the stretched image as you work.

Our clients who have used both a stretching machine and our StretchRelief™ tool have reported greater success and satisfaction with the StretchRelief™.

The StretchRelief redefines the concept of a stretching plier. Unlike conventional pliers, which have a very limited life span, the StretchRelief™’s precision machined design will give you thousands of stretches. With the StretchRelief™ you will now be able to greatly increase your production output for a relatively small investment. Breathing Color has finally solved the otherwise difficult problem of gallery wrap stretching with this amazing and cost effective tool.

Once the print has completely dried, you should have no problem rolling it up.  Keep in mind that when the print is exposed to extremely hot or humid temperatures, it may have a tendency to soften and stick to itself.  For this reason it is always recommended to protect each print with a sheet of an acid-free barrier paper.

Timeless

Display life of any media will be greatly decreased by an extreme environment. Art Peel is no different. No immediate adverse effects should be present, but overall lifespan will certainly suffer if it's in extreme temperatures or high humidity.

Ultrachrome/K3 Ink - General

A. 90 psi @ 2CFM or greater.  This can easily be obtained with a typical “pancake” compressor that can be purchased at Home Depot or Lowes. Here is a link to just a few. <click here>

Add 1 ½" on all 4 sides (3" total) for EW 1.25", and add 2" on all 4 sides (4" total) for EW Pro. The additional ¼" on each side is for bleed that will be trimmed off. The above example would be printed at 19" x 23" for EW 1.25", and 20" x 24" for EW Pro. 

Timeless needs to be applied with pressure, but reducing the amount of pressure when you finish coating is important. If you notice roller marks while the print is still wet, simply go over them with  firm pressure and reduce the pressure with each roll movement. After a few seconds, each roller mark should disappear.

We do have many customers using the Canon i9900 and the Epson R1800 and having success with 13" x 19" sheets of Brilliance Chromata White Canvas. Both printers work well but both printers have a hard time feeding inkjet canvas. If you are planning on printing a lot of canvas, we recommend the Epson 4800. Although the 4800 is significantly more expensive, it will not give you any problems with printing while the R1800 and i9900 might.

SEISMIC ANALOGIES IN WIDE FORMAT

Congratulations! Six months ago you took delivery of your new Epson wide format printer and you are now outputting top quality photographic or fine art pieces on art paper, film and/or canvas. By now you have obtained a good grasp of the color management requirements and operational details. You have mastered the market that Epson has targeted for these incredible machines and hopefully you are making a profit in the process. You are also a player in a fascinating seismic change in market conditions, which has been taking place over the last decade due to the evolution of digital technology. This tidal wave of change has allowed you to be doing what you are doing right now with your Epson printer. It is also right behind your back ready to sweep you away in a bubbling backwash of “creative destruction”.

Don’t think you are at risk? Take a look at the short history of high end digital art production. Ten years ago the entire market was dominated by a small group of publishers who financed, printed or outsourced, and distributed art. The first seismic shift occurred with the application of high-end Iris printers being used to produce prints. The dynamics involved in marketing an edition has changed dramatically over a short period of only a few years. Instead of needing $20,000 for a serigraphic edition, one could output art on demand, lowering the financial barrier of entry of running small editions, 40 fold. Sell a few, and then print a few more. An artist could now publish himself (self-empowerment). The $100,000 price tag of an Iris was a new financial barrier creating a new series of companies that began printing for both publishers and artists who were savvy enough to be able to market their products themselves. Publishers and serigraphic printers were stunned by this. Does everyone remember the “Giclee” vs Serigraphy debate? How about further back when Serigraphy was the new kid on the block and the battlefield was Serigraphy vs. Stone Litho? History has proven to us that it is almost always a bad plan defending old business/technology models vs. new business/technology models with inherent advantages. Although the older models may suffice in the short term, they rarely withstand the pressures of an advancing industry over the long term. This is not to say that a few fine boutique operations (including a few fine stone litho operations) cannot survive the turmoil. But the vast majority of them are now going or gone.

The next seismic shift occurred with the introduction of the first usable generation of pigmented inks from Epson. Epson “Archival Inks” were a major breakthrough that forever changed the entire printmaking landscape, yet again. Certainly by now we are all aware of its shortcomings; lower color gamut, metamerism, too much glycol, and sensitivity to ozone (First generations always have their problems, in products and in everything else). But did you not feel the ground shift beneath your feet when this technology was released? Did you not feel the entire landscape experience another contortion? To most, this contortion could be reasonably described as seismic industry activity. Print longevity, the “Achilles’ Heel” of the giclee market, was being aggressively addressed. For a tenth of the cost of an Iris, this particular micro-world became Epson’s overnight (please, no Roland comments as they were very creatively using Epson technology). Iris was forced aside from that point forward. You can pick up an Iris on EBay for a song (although I wouldn’t be singing)! While, Iris studios still exist and they continue making beautiful prints, the fact remains that it is a market in contraction. This market will continue to contract. In summary, the introduction of low-cost printers created the following market changes; lower cost of entry, publishers became less important, the level of expertise required for printmaking significantly decreased, and the market expanded.

This brings us to the introduction of Ultrachrome inks. Could this be considered another seismic event? Most industry veterans would support this claim. In fact, there is a strong chance that the majority of you reading this article began digital printing as a result of Epson’s release of the Ultrachrome Inks.

In reality, the introduction of Ultrachrome Inks was more of a strong aftershock than a unique cataclysmic event. Although marketed as a “new” product by Epson, Ultrachrome was actually a graceful extension of the Archival Inks. The issues that plagued the Archival Inks were being addressed and the product had improved. Namely, the print quality was significantly better, the ease of operation was improved upon, and the cost of entry was cut in half.

Now that we are up to speed, what does the market currently look like? Today, for only a few thousand dollars, just about anyone can set themselves up as a digital print studio. Granted, it still takes expertise to produce a truly great product. Though, little by little that barrier is being compromised by continuous substrate developments, color management improvements, Photoshop upgrades, new software development, and continuous innovation from Epson and other manufacturers. These products will eventually become completely turnkey, allowing the novice printmakers of tomorrow to produce visually indistinguishable prints from your knowledge-invested prints of today.

Make no mistake about it; the current value that you add to the present economical equation is through your technical knowledge on how to make a beautiful print. In the mainstream photographic and fine-art markets, that value is going to contract. Are you prepared for this?

How do you prepare for the continuous seismic events shaking your livelihood? The first step is to use your current cash flow stream to distinguish yourself from the mainstream flow of product development. Distance yourself from what will be replaced, inevitably, with improved technology. This, of course, does not mean that you should stop using products that are generating current profits. It does mean that you should continuously look for specialty markets that are growing in which you can develop unique knowledge that will provide you with future source of income.

As companies like Epson and HP grows in size, their internal requirements to enter a specialty markets naturally increase. This will open opportunities in specialty markets that Epson hasn’t automated (or maybe never will) because the market is not big enough for them to waste their time on it. These are the markets you need to capitalize on. Large corporations like Epson and HP will only enter and automate markets that cross a certain revenue threshold and that bar will consistently move higher as long as Epson grows in size. These are the markets you need to diversify away from.

How do you spot these unique opportunities? You don’t necessarily have to be the trail blazer, innovating everything yourself. In today’s world, the best growth opportunities reach your critical-mass size when a small group of innovators band together to share information on a growing market that excites them. With the information availability of the internet, these groups share an amazing amount of information online (that in the past would have been proprietary). This free flow of information has had the desirable effect of causing rapid innovation growth and turbo charging new market expansion. Therein lays the opportunity to earn.

Today’s printmaking entrepreneur (and most of you are exactly that) will have to be nimble and constantly able to reinvent themselves, evolving with the competitive landscape of this industry. You must be realistic in evaluating where technology in going and how that will help you or hinder your future earning potential. Most importantly, you must have the ability to spot seismic events that will drastically change the entire environment, even when it’s not initially noticeable. Only then can you tailor a long-term strategy to meet the demands of the ever-changing marketplace.

This article was written as a collaboration of the R&D department at Breathing Color, Inc.  This article reflects the views of individuals within that department.  It does not reflect the views of management of Breathing Color, Inc.

We do not recommend an air pressure setting as not all guns, air compressors, nozzles, etc. are the same. Therefore it is recommended that customers using an HVLP gun to coat with Glamour II Veneer test several different pressure settings and coating techniques to determine the best solution for each unique setup is.

Often we get support issues from our customers telling us that Elegance Velvet is flaking terribly when they print, causing voids to become apparent when the flakes fall off.  We also are occassionally told that Elegance Velvet has a large amount of debris on the surface.

Neither of these are true of Elegance Velvet.  This fine art paper is made with an inkjet receptive coating that does not flake, and is also very resistant to scuffing

If you believe your Elegance Velvet roll is flaking, here are a few things to check on:

(1) Are you working in a particularly dusty environment? If your printers are in a dusty or dirty environment, this is definetely going to affect your prints.  Dust and debris can get into the inside of your printer, they can also affect your heads which could cause voids in printed image.  Furthermore, if your fine art paper roll is exposed (not in its plastic) for short periods of time, the dust and debris will land on the roll.  This brings us to the next issue -

(2) How long was your Elegance Velvet fine art paper roll left "exposed" (meaning, without plastic covering and also not in its original box)?Leaving your roll of fine art paper (or canvas) exposed for even short periods of time is dangerous because all sorts of debris will definetely attach itself to the roll.  This doesnt even matter if you think your environment is very clean.  The particles that will affect your roll are extremely small, they travel without the help of any wind (when people walk on carpet, or even when people breathe -- you can imagine what a cieling fan or a standing floor fan will do), and they are everywhere.  If you have left your roll of fine art paper exposed for a few hours, depending upon your environment and where you actually placed the roll, your roll is probably affected with debris.The right practice is to only open the roll when you plan on printing it.  When it is not printing, you should put the roll back into its plastic cover and then into its original box. Note: Dont ever put the roll back into its original box without the plastic.  Also, dont ever substitute the plastic cover for anything else - such as Kraft Paper.  Both Cardboard boxes and Kraft Paper are acidic.

(3) If you are not working in a dusty or dirty environment, and if there are no fans on or serious air flow, and if you are taking a roll of Elegance Velvet out and are literally putting it right onto the printer and print on it immediately, you should not have any issues.  If you still have issues, the problem may be within your printer.  If you print on other fine art papers in the same environment on the exact same printer, and the other fine art papers dont have the same problem, then it could be that you have a defective roll.

If this is the case, we will ask you to send one of your unopened rolls to us so that we can test it in our controlled environment.  If we find the product to be defective, we will replace your rolls or provide you with a refund immediately.  Please understand that because defective issues with Elegance Velvet are around .01%, and this .01% is not from flaking, we must have you complete issues #1-3 above before we can proceed to performing our own tests.  To date, you must keep in mind that we have never had a defective roll of Elegance Velvet returned because it actually was flaking.

Since all canvases are very breathable, they are prone to a number of atmospheric variables. High relative humidity in a room, combined with hot temperatures can change the structure of your canvas. However there are solutions to this problem, one of which that is very effective, would be to take an already stretched print and spray the back of the print with distilled water. Make sure when you apply the water you are not soaking it, just enough to moisten it. Since the canvas is made of cotton, it should shrink causing it to become taught once again. You also may want to go through this process possibly more than once depending on how hot the lights really are. If you have an further questions please do not hesitate to contact on our sales representatives at 866-722-6567.